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  • This is CNN STUDENT NEWS. Welcome to Wednesday`s edition of our commercial free show. I`m Carl Azuz.

  • First up, the White House has released a new report on climate change.

  • It says that the global climate is getting worse and that it hopes this report will influence Americans to support government action and community action to fight climate change.

  • Some Republicans call this report a political tool.

  • They say it`s being released so the Obama administration can make changes to energy laws, changes that critics say would hurt the American economy.

  • Officials with the Obama administration plan to fan out across the country carrying messages from the report of how different regions could be affected.

  • Here`s what the report lays out for our future.

  • The Northeast can expect more heat waves, increased coastal sea level surge flooding and more severe inland flash flooding.

  • The Southeast will see new fresh water issues due to drought and increased population.

  • As well as increased ocean search flooding from tropical systems along the coast.

  • The Midwest - yes, there will be a longer growing season.

  • But more extreme heatwaves, droughts and flash flooding may counteract that positive.

  • The Plains will experience an increased demand for water and energy due to the higher temperatures.

  • In the southwest, severe droughts and wildfires will increase, fresh water may become more scarce than it already is.

  • The northwest, earlier than normal snow melt may stress summer water supplies in the river systems there.

  • In Alaska, retreating glaciers, receding summer ice levels and thawing permafrost will cause damage to infrastructure and ecosystems.

  • And finally the ocean. It is absorbing carbon dioxide as carbonic acid.

  • And it`s rapidly changing the Ph worldwide.

  • It`s called ocean acidification.

  • Stressing marine ecosystems, coral reefs and the food chain.

  • Time for the Shoutout. U-2, C-130 N3N are all examples of what? If you think you know it shout it out.

  • Is it - planes, trains, automobiles or elements? You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • These are all types of aircrafts with very different types of technology. That`s your answer and that`s your Shoutout.

  • The U-2, for instance, is an American plane designed to gather intelligence, spy, and it`s been in service since the 1950s.

  • A U-2 can fly at very high altitudes up to 90,000 feet.

  • One of them was flying high over California last week.

  • FAA officials say they weren`t concerned about the fact that it was a spy plane.

  • But the FAA computer that picked it up thought it was flying much lower,

  • like in the crowded airspace with other planes lower.

  • And the Federal Aviation Administration system got confused by all of the changes in the U-2`s flight pass.

  • So it shut down for an hour.

  • Did that disrupt flights in California? Yes.

  • Did it have lasting effects? Yes, for half a day.

  • Delayed flights, diverted flights, canceled flights. Fortunately, there were no accidents or injuries.

  • Fighting in the Korean War ended in 1953.

  • But the conflict itself was never formally resolved.

  • The U.S. is the ally of South Korea. These two counties are still at odds with North Korea.

  • And the North often makes threatening statements directed at the U.S.

  • What`s worrying American officials now is the fact that North Korea may be getting closer to a very long range weapon.

  • U.S. military intelligence now believes Kim Jong-un`s regime is ready at any time to conduct both an underground nuclear test and to test a missile that could reach you at shores.

  • The problem - no one knows if and when North Korea might do it.

  • We continue to monitor the situation on the Korean Peninsula very closely as we always do.

  • What the U.S. is watching is this test site in North Korea.

  • The Web site, 38 North, which closely monitors North Korea says commercial satellites snap to these pictures showing engine testing for a crucial long range missile called the KNO-8.

  • The KNO-8 for showing as a mock up at this parade is a mobile intercontinental missile, a huge worry.

  • Because if North Korea can develop a mobile missile with a nuclear warhead,

  • they can move it around quickly. A U.S. space satellite might not find it before it launches.

  • It`s estimated that this road mobile missiles could have a range of as far as 6,000 miles.

  • Again, we don`t know if that`s true because they haven`t tested one, but if they can fire road mobile missiles that far,

  • that puts places like Alaska, Hawaii and Los Angeles within range.

  • Analysts say the imagery shows evidence that engine test happened in a recent two week period.

  • Fuel tanks have been moved from the immediate test area to a post-test storage site.

  • As you can see here, from the Website 38 North, it also shows vehicles have been brought in,

  • carrying personnel and equipment and the trench has turned white,

  • possibly from the blast of an engine test.

  • From West to East, it`s time for an international Roll Call this worldwide Wednesday.

  • Pioneer Middle School is located in Alberta, Canada and we are glad to have them watching CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Across the Pacific, hello to everyone at Chionan Girls` High School.

  • They are online in Seoul, South Korea.

  • And in the Philippines, we have some viewers at International School of Manila.

  • They are seeing today`s show in their nation`s capital.

  • There are a lot of ways you can honor educators this teacher appreciation week.

  • You can write a letter. You can send a card if you`re on Facebook,

  • you could join the hundreds commenting at Facebook.com/cnnstudentsnews.

  • Miyanah says Senora Smith at Nottoway Middle School understand her.

  • That she is like a big sister she can tell anything to.

  • Kiaya or Kia says Ms. Smathers at Balch Springs Middle School is the best math teacher ever.

  • She really cares about us.

  • Joe writes, Mrs. Malone, my 8th grade science teacher was always there for me when no one else was.

  • She inspired me to become a biologist.

  • And Noah says, Mr. Speas is the best social studies teacher for making a boring class not boring.

  • When a school invites a highly visible public figure to speak at its graduation, it might be taking a risk.

  • Some students might not agree with the person`s work, or views, or politics.

  • Something interesting this year is the number of would-be graduation speakers who are backing out.

  • It`s that time of year again.

  • The majesty of public circumstance. Accolades.

  • An honorary doctorate from Harvard.

  • And potentially important advice.

  • Stay hungry, stay foolish.

  • That is, if the commencement speaker is allowed to speak.

  • This year, a number of high profile invitees to this vibrant institutions of debate and discussion and ideas - well,

  • they are being protested because some people don`t like their ideas.

  • Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice was selected to address graduates at Rutgers University,

  • but her past involvement with the Iraq War caused some students to say no to Condo!

  • Yeah to Gandhi!

  • The Stanford professor decided to say no to them, writing on her Facebook page Rutgers` invitation to me to speak has become a distraction for the university community.

  • But at least Rice was apparently able to make that decision on her own.

  • Brandeis University offered an honorary degree to Ayaan Hirsi Ali,

  • the Somali Dutch critic of Islam, but students protested her views and Ali`s honorary degree was rescinded.

  • It all might make you wonder just who is running these schools and what exactly is being taught about free expression and debate.

  • Controversy can strike even the least likely of invitees:

  • in 1990 then first lady Barbara Bush was deemed unsuitable by students graduating from Wellesley College.

  • Her husband protested back.

  • I think that these young women can have a lot to learn from Barbara Bush and from her unselfishness and from her advocacy of literacy and of being a good mother and a lot of other things.

  • President Obama had to defend himself in 2009 when Notre Dame students protested his stand on abortion rights.

  • I also want to thank you for the honorary degree that I received. I know it has not been without controversy.

  • Applauded or protested, this year speakers will be addressing a very important group - the next generation of controversial invitees.

  • Before we go, this would have made one heck of a speed bump.

  • We may never know why the chicken crossed the road, but that`s a lot less disconcerting than this giant alligator.

  • A South Carolina state representative saw this monstrosity not far from Myrtle Beach.

  • Fortunately, the man who got this video was in a car.

  • Imagine coming up on this thing in a bike.

  • The gator eventually wandered off to some water nearby, by made for one great story when the reptiles his friends.

  • They could jaw for a while over that siting.

  • It could really test his lizard of storytelling.

  • Hopefully, people will think it`s a croaker or tall-tale because that will be kind of cold bloodied.

  • I`m Carl Azuz, and we`ll see you later.

This is CNN STUDENT NEWS. Welcome to Wednesday`s edition of our commercial free show. I`m Carl Azuz.

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May 7, 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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