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  • good evening.

  • The Conservatives and Labour have been outlining their main pitch to voters.

  • The prime minister, in his first major speech of the campaign, said a conservative government would unite the country on level up the prospects for people with massive investment in health, better infrastructure, more police and a green revolution.

  • But he said the key issue to solve was Brexit.

  • Meanwhile, Labour vowed to outspend the Tories on the NHS in England, promising an additional £6 billion a year by 2024 whales.

  • Northern Ireland and Scotland would get the same percentage increase, but it's not been an easy down.

  • The campaign trail is our political editor Laura Ginsburg reports.

  • Voters tried to take charge today.

  • Prime minister in Yorkshire given a talking to by people whose lives have been turned upside down by floods late his offer of help, they said a little bit too late.

  • It's a little bit.

  • While Labour leader was confronted on the campaign trail in Glasgow running away and even the Lib Dems battle bus was blocked in a well heeled part of north London protests that decisions they took in coalition with the Tories years ago.

  • This is the smoother side of the campaign.

  • The Conservatives want you to see promising a greener government on again and again.

  • Boris Johnson's value to take us out of the U without delay.

  • It's done.

  • It's complete.

  • It's ready to go.

  • It's it's It's the Blue Peter deal.

  • Here's one I made earlier.

  • Always all we need, all we need is a working majority.

  • All we need is a working majority in Parliament to make Parliament work just nine more seats.

  • None of his answers were good enough, though, for one of its former colleagues who'll stand as an independent and thinks you should think about voting lib.

  • Damn traditional conservative voters like me should lend their support to the Liberal Democrats.

  • But I I think I'm best placed to run as an independent.

  • Today we've seen voters in Yorkshire be very unimpressed by your handling of the floods on several of your former colleagues who are even conservative ministers suggesting that people should think seriously about voting Lib dem!

  • Do you think you're in control of this campaign?

  • I was.

  • I made clear threat the my time there.

  • Obviously the government stands ready to support in any way that we can.

  • Andi.

  • I hope that people understand the messages of reassurance that we've bean giving.

  • Your second question was about the election, Andi.

  • All I would say that Laura is Look, of course we need to get Brexit done, and I haven't I make no apology for mentioning it because it has bean paralysing politics for 3.5 years.

  • Andi Andi, I'm afraid to say that the only way to get Brexit done at this election is to vote for the Conservatives on the hope that we can get a working majority.

  • Trail looks the same, but this is the strangest least predictable.

  • On most important election in a long time, all of the parties will try to stick to their favorite subjects.

  • But as they clock up the miles and crisscross the country, every leader is likely to be pushed well beyond their comfort zone.

  • They wanted to concentrate on the extra big check they'd write for the NHS.

  • With a labour government, there will be 26 billion extra in real terms for our NHS.

  • Change is coming for patients and NHS staff vote labour for our suggests.

  • Thank you.

  • But there was confusion to Theo John on the Left said this morning that NHS staff would not be part of their promise of a four day week but the John on the right at the labour conference, Mr McDonald, you suggested a hugely ambitious policy to put everybody on a four day working week this morning, John said.

  • It was nonsense to suggest that could include the NHS, which is it we were to live with.

  • We don't live toe work.

  • Theo on that will apply to everybody.

  • It is early in this campaign.

  • The party's official manifestos went to marriage for another week, but all sides have been forced already to go off the script.

  • Laura Conspired.

  • BBC News Coventry So under Labour, a big increase in spending on the NHS in England six billion a year on top of the extra 20 billion already promised by Theresa May.

  • What difference could the extra money make for patients and for NHS staff are health editor Hugh Pym has been looking at the figures.

  • Once again, the NHS is front and center in the run up to polling day, with the parties vying to outspend each other.

  • The conservative government's already promised an extra £20 billion a year after inflation by 2023 in England, Labour have said they'll add another six billion to that, bringing the annual increase to 26 billion and spend some of that on cutting waiting times for patients.

  • Francis, who has arthritis, is finding life a lot easier after a hip replacement, but she had to wait more than six months to get it done two months longer than the official NHS target.

  • She says the delay affected her in many ways.

  • Waiting that extra time was hard.

  • I mean, I was deteriorating almost week by week.

  • You could I could do less unless unless so, no only had eye problems with my left hip, but basically my right hip and right knee.

  • We're taking an awful lot of straining on.

  • They were playing up big time as well, so I was in a really bad physical shape.

  • Whether it's a hip operation or managing a long term health condition, the big challenge for the NHS is keeping up with increasing demands for patient care on finding the money for that is never easy.

  • Government spending this year on the health service in England is £139 billion.

  • That sounds like a lot and has been an upward trend for total spending over the last decade.

  • But spending per person actually fell for a while.

  • Once you've adjusted for the needs of a growing and aging population, that's the bottom line.

  • It's only started picking up in the last couple of years.

  • Ondas a percentage of GDP.

  • That's the U.

  • K's national income.

  • You can see here that UK health spending has actually fallen over recent years.

  • Labour plans higher spending that under the conservatives those slower increases than under Tony Blair and Gordon Brown.

  • Funding is one thing.

  • But workforce planning, with more done to retain staff, is what many in the NHS say is the top priority.

  • Laura, who's a matron on a Children's ward, told us the pressure was relentless.

  • It's exceptionally challenging at the moment.

  • We struggled day in, day out, looking after our patients.

  • We do our absolute best for our patients at all times, but there just aren't enough of us.

  • Teoh keep things kind of going at this level.

  • The politicians will have to persuade us they really are serious about supporting the people of the heart of the NHS Cubin.

  • BBC News Let's take a look at some of today's other election use now, and the Liberal Democrats are promising a £500 million per year increase in funding for youth services in England to help tackle what their leader, Jo Swinson, called an epidemic of knife crime.

  • Unveiling the planet a boxing gym, she said the hope is to stop young people falling into violence by coordinating help from teachers, health professionals and social services.

  • Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland would also receive extra money.

  • Nigel Farage, who also chose a boxing team for his campaign speech, has again refused to stand down Brexit party candidates in labor marginal seats.

  • He's been under pressure to withdraw from some constituencies where conservatives fear he could split the leave vote.

  • On Monday, he withdrew Brexit party candidates from all of the seats won by the Tories at the last election.

  • Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has faced questions over his position on allowing a second referendum on Scottish independence today at the start of a two day tour of Scotland.

  • He said he wouldn't allow one in the first term of a Labour government, but later wrote back, saying it wouldn't be a priority In the early years, Jeremy Corbyn began his visiting Glasgow is the party fights for seats in Scotland, which a decade ago was a labour Heartland.

  • In 2010 Labour won 41 of the 59 seats.

  • But in 2015 the year after the first independence referendum, the SNP swept the board, leaving Labour with just one seat north of the border.

  • 2017 saw the party make a slight come back, returning seven Scottish Labour MPs But Jeremy Corbyn's chances of becoming prime minister depend on winning back more.

  • Here's our Scotland editor Sarah Smith.

  • A tartan scarf on the gift of some brand new gloves may well be required for winter campaigning in Scotland, where Labour is facing a tough election.

  • The choice is quite simple.

  • The Tory government or a Labour government.

  • He didn't mention the SNP or the demand for another independence referendum.

  • But that's the big question in Scotland.

  • No referendum in the first term for Labour government because I think we need to concentrate completely on investment across Scotland, but that's not quite the official policy.

  • His advisers rushed to clarify Labour might permit another vote after 2021 Carbon have answered questions about 10 times already.

  • So what exactly is the formal position in the early years of a Labour government?

  • I want to concentrate totally on investment all across the UK, including the 70 billion that I want to affirm on independence.

  • In a saying in the early years, let's say no to that.

  • Let's concentrate on what mattered.

  • Independence matters in Scotland and you need to know where you stand.

  • Labour will have to work really hard if they want to try and win any new seats in Scotland and truth, they're hoping to hold on to the few they've already got.

  • With its proud industrial heritage, Central Scotland used to be rock solid labour, but the machinery is now in a museum and in the Kathy, vultures have moved on to look has always.

  • Bean left of center, slightly left of center, now hasn't changed in the Labour Party to me, are dressed in Orphan T yesterday's politics, Every vote for Labour if they were a separate party in Scotland and if they represented what they used to represent, probably got a choice between Boris Johnson and Jeremy Carbon Who would you rather see in number 10?

  • And you look forward to the idea of a gentleman carbon prime minister?

  • Well, I think I would dread at least see the alternative.

  • SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon says she would work with a minority Labour government to keep the Tories out of power only if Jeremy Carbon allows an independence referendum.

  • I wouldn't help him in power to get into pro to stay in power if he doesn't accept the principle that whether that is a referendum in Scotland on what the time scale of that referendum should be should be determined by the people of Scotland.

  • She knows she can't become prime minister, but Miss Sturgeon doesn't want to be left out of the argument.

  • She's taking legal action, demanding to be included in televised leaders debates.

  • Sarah Smith, BBC News Corp Bridge.

  • Let's talk to our political editor Laura Kuhns Bag, who is on the campaign trail this evening.

  • The president of the European Council, Donald Tusk, gave a speech this evening in Belgium, which he appeared to suggest that Brexit might know actually happen.

  • That's right, Sophie.

  • Our viewers will be familiar with Donald to scare someone who's been the top official in Brussels over these last tricky few years.

  • He is standing down, and he gave something of a farewell speech tonight in which, as you suggest, he made it pretty clear that he believes Brexit could still be stopped on.

  • He said he wanted to give hope to those people on that side of the argument.

  • Now it's hard to see that as anything other than backing for one side in this election.

  • On on that other side, though, I understand that the government is to make it clear to Brussels that despite repeated requests from the U, they're not going to put forward a British name to be the UK commissioner when there's a big change of all the teams in Brussels who are in charge of all the important decisions now, Brussels has been asking the British government to do this for some time now.

  • Boris Johnson promised that he would not.

  • But I understand tonight Sir Tim Barrow, who's are you ambassador in Brussels, has written to the commission saying this won't happen because of the guidelines during the election that essentially say the government can't make big sensitive political decisions.

  • But this has bean something over fraud exchange between the U and the U.

  • K.

  • And it may be in the morning.

  • There's some raised eyebrows in Brussels over the decision that the government is taking here.

  • So even though the outcome of this election is really unclear, there's still many weeks to go.

  • The wrangling over Brexit is absolutely still live and kicking.

  • Laura comes back.

  • Thank you.

good evening.

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UK Election 2019: Brexit and the NHS dominate election campaign debate- BBC News

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/02
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