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  • good evening.

  • Leaving the U with a deal by the end of October is now looking extremely unlikely, according to Downing Street, and talks are close to breaking down.

  • The claim follows what was described as a challenging phone call between Boris Johnson and Angela Merkel this morning in which the German chancellor apparently said a deal was unlikely and less Northern Ireland remained in the customs union.

  • There was an angry response from Brussels is the use.

  • Top official Donald Tusk warned Boris Johnson not to become engaged in what he called a stupid blame game.

  • The prime minister is now due to meet the Irish premier Li America later in the week for crunch talks.

  • Our political editor, Laura Kingsburg reports hugs and smiles outside the door.

  • Prime minister greets the president of the E.

  • U Parliament president says only is a deal still possible?

  • Another one of the continental politicians he has to convince.

  • But is there a point to all this now?

  • Of course, Boris Johnson planes after 45 minutes of talk.

  • So the awkward truth.

  • There's been no progress to getting a deal.

  • Senior sous Elise conclusion.

  • So there are two alternatives now an extension or leaving without a deal.

  • Still, publicly, ministers are hurrying to try.

  • Of course they'll be bumps in the road and the path to a deal.

  • But I'm confident that the fair and reasonable offer that we've put forward will elicit from our European friends progress in the days ahead.

  • But early this morning, before the Cabinet arrived, prime minister spoke to Angela Merkel for half an hour.

  • Number 10 sources told me her conclusion and there's a deal this month was almost impossible.

  • Have reached the end of the road.

  • We're getting a deal unless the EU got Northern Ireland to stay in the customs union, and that has always been ruled out by this administration.

  • With customary formality, Germany would not confirm the contents of the call Your slick was put onions also, television, you wonder.

  • But with no change in position, the chances of a deal now seem almost gone.

  • Then they used top official jumped into their hostilities, accusing Boris Johnson of getting into a stupid blame game.

  • What's at stake is the future of Europe in the U.

  • K.

  • As well as the security and interests of our people, Donald Tusk wrote.

  • Forget that he said.

  • She said, in a way, it's a simple standoff.

  • Boris Johnson wants a different deal with the U.

  • That would mean different customs systems on either side of the Irish border.

  • But the U believes that's not realistic without serious disruption.

  • So saying no and that means it's extremely unlikely an agreement can be reached in time for the UK to leave the U with a deal at the end of this month.

  • Tonight, the T shirt told Irish TV he and Boris Johnson agreed they would keep trying for a deal, but I think it's gonna be very difficult to secure an agreement by next week.

  • Quite frankly, um, essentially, what the United Kingdom has done is repudiation.

  • The deal that we negotiated in good faith with Prime Minister May's government over two years kind of sort of put half of that now, back on the table, andare saying That's a concession and of course it isn't and it's not truly over until it's really over.

  • The U.

  • K's negotiator, David Frost, swept into Brussels today from more talks despite the opposition skepticism it could ever really happen, put proposals on the table.

  • I would never gonna work they were designed to fail on instead of reacting and changing their proposals there.

  • Now collapsing the talks on engaging in a in a reckless blame game, Parliament packed up for a week tonight, suspended again before the government puts its plans for the country forward in a queen's speech next Monday.

  • Hard to tell tonight what the plans for Brexit will look like by then.

  • Lorcan Spark BBC News.

  • Westminster preparations are continuing for a no deal Brexit and today the Cabinet minister in charge of that, Michael Gove, said that even with every possible preparation in place, risks and challenges for businesses still remain.

  • Today.

  • The think tank for the Institute for Fiscal Studies issued a stark warning about the impact of a no deal Brexit on the economy, predicting that national debt would rise to levels not seen since the 19 sixties.

  • This could lead to future governments imposing more spending cuts, raising taxes or both, our economics editor Faisal Islam reports as the Brexit deal looks increasingly log jammed, planning four and consequences often no deal.

  • Brexit and its immediate impact on trade up and down the country matter more than ever.

  • The government has not updated its numbers.

  • But the likes of the Institute for Fiscal Studies has The I.

  • F.

  • S predicts that the public finances will be heavily impacted by a no deal Brexit that the annual level of borrowing the deficit will double over two years approaching, ah, 100 £1,000,000,000 on that the total stock, our national debt that that would reach the highest level it's been for over half a century.

  • We have no deal.

  • The economy would grow very little if a tall over the next two or three years borrowing would rise up towards £1,000,009,100 a year, which is a very significant increase on where we are.

  • If that happened, I think we have to have another period of either tax increases or spending cuts to get it back under control.

  • So why is that?

  • The expert economists behind this reports say that no deal will impact our trade with Europe and lead to a smaller economy, compared with Brexit being reversed, for example, a gap of over 4% that could be mostly eliminated if there was still a deal.

  • Here's an example of wine exporting fish to markets in the European union would require farm or red tape, customs and bets.

  • Health jets confirmed in the government's published latest No Deal preparation documents Minister in charge, praising the efforts of business.

  • Of course, risks remain and challenges for some businesses cannot be entirely mitigated even with every possible preparation in place.

  • But the UK economy is in a much better position to meet those risks and challenges thanks to the efforts of these sectors and companies are my right on the friend the chancellor.

  • That's not what many farmers are saying.

  • After the government decided to prioritize cheaper consumer prices of products such as imported eggs, it didn't offer protection for the domestic poultry industry.

  • When it confirmed plans for post no deal taxes on trade tariffs of concern for a government preparing for an election.

  • Farming lobby said it felt betrayed.

  • Well, ultimately, history shows you what it means.

  • You know, if you import cheap, raw ingredients that have produced to lower standards, we just downsize our production.

  • We export our production abroad on, we take in cheap imports.

  • In many cases, that would be illegal for our farmers to produce two here.

  • The latest numbers show that the economy in general is becoming less productive after a slump in business investment that many blame on the prospect of no deal and prolonged political uncertainty.

  • As the tide goes out on negotiations, British businesses are still left searching for answers.

  • Faisal Islam.

  • BBC News Let's get the latest now from our political absolute Cruz Berg on our European catty Adler in Brussels.

  • Cattle.

  • You can sense the frustration in Brussels from you perspective.

  • Do they feel that these talks have reached a dead end?

  • Well, Sophie, No.

  • And yes, I mean very little is straightforward when it come to this Brexit process.

  • If we take that all important step back, you leaders still want a deal.

  • And they believe that Boris Johnson still want to deal, although they're not convinced just how high up his list of priorities.

  • Getting a deal with the U comes compared, for example, to winning a general election.

  • But in the meantime, they say they're still open for talks, including this week.

  • They haven't entirely ruled out the possibility of finding a deal by the end off this month.

  • But realistically speaking, Boris Johnson's proposals on how to replace the Irish backs up are problematic for the, you know completely, not the whole offer.

  • But when it comes down to customs, Boris Johnson insists North knighted must stay in the United Kingdom's customs territory after Brexit.

  • But that leaves the EU with two choices.

  • Either have customs infrastructure on the island of Ireland, and Dublin says that's a no no or the EU doesn't control its own customs border.

  • It says That's impossible.

  • What about food safety?

  • It says in the single market.

  • But Sophie, this isn't the end of the road for the you, cause they're looking more long term.

  • They think a new Brexit extension is the most likely outcome here, giving more time for talks.

  • But no one here is starry I that I talked to about the idea of more time.

  • Of course, you still need to find an accord between the EU and UK acceptable to the European Parliament on the UK Parliament as well.

  • And of course, no one knows exactly what that accord will look like, neither now nor in two or three months time.

  • So Laura, it is a, well, clearly hanging in the balance.

  • And if these talks don't work, what then We'll Sophie.

  • It's hard to tell as ever, whether or not today's extraordinary twists and turns have been, you know, a firework that briefly lights up the sky and people freeze in horror and say What's going on here?

  • Or whether indeed, they've seen some kind of diplomatic explosion that wipes out the idea that there will be any progress in the coming weeks.

  • This castle was suggesting it's not impossible that there could be some kind of resolution, but on the current path, it does look vanishingly unlikely.

  • And that means therefore, in all likelihood, we're looking at a situation where the prime minister is forced to ask the U for a delay for an extension, but for a delay and an extension that he does not want, we know that Parliament will try everything to block him, taking us out of the European Union without a deal.

  • They've changed the law to try to make it impossible for him to do so.

  • But we also know, and it's always been completely clear with this administration that number one on the prime minister's list is trying to get us out of the European Union at the end of this month.

  • Whatever the wisdom of the promise that he made in his leadership campaign.

  • That is the vow that he wants to try to keep above all else.

  • So if this all fails, we can expect in the immediate aftermath of the European summit legal and political screaming match that goes on for a number of days before either Boris Johnson is forced to get that delay.

  • And then we probably tip very quickly into a general election or somehow by hook or by crook.

  • He achieves what looks very, very difficult for what he still wants to do is take us out of the U at the end of this month.

  • But at the moment it looks like in any way we're heading for a period that may well be even more turbulent than what we've lived through in recent weeks.

  • Nora Cata, Thank you.

good evening.

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Brexit deal essentially impossible - No 10 source - BBC News

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/02
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