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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

  • Hi, I'm Neil.

  • Joining me today is Dan.

  • Hi, Dan.

  • Hello, everybody.

  • What is our story?

  • Our story is about approaching hurricane.

  • Okay, let's find out some more about that from this BBC World Service News Bulletin.

  • A large scale evacuation is underway in the United States.

  • Is the East Coast braces for Hurricane Florence?

  • What may be the strongest storm to hit the region in decades?

  • South Carolina's governor ordered the evacuation of its entire coastline involving over a 1,000,000 people, while North Carolina and Virginia have declared states of emergency is expected to make landfall by Thursday.

  • So Hurricane Florence is approaching the east coast of the United States that was recently upgraded to a Category four storm, so it's very, very strong.

  • In fact, people are saying it's the strongest in decades.

  • As a result, over one million people are being evacuated from their homes in South Carolina, and North Carolina and Virginia have deterred states of emergency, and he gets worse out in the ocean.

  • There are two more hurricanes, Isaac and Helen, that could potentially follow along the same path.

  • Okay, well, you've been researching this story and picking out useful vocabulary to talk about it.

  • What have you got?

  • We've got menace churning and lurking menace churning and lurking.

  • So let's go to that first headline with the word menace in it, please.

  • Very well.

  • From the Otto, our citizen, Hurricane Florence explodes into a category four storm as 209 kilometre an hour winds menace U S East coast.

  • And that's menace.

  • Meaning threaten toe hurt as a verb here.

  • Exactly.

  • So if you menace someone or something, then you threaten to hurt it.

  • You terrorize it.

  • You cause anxiety.

  • Anything like that.

  • You might minutes someone with a fist.

  • I'm gonna get you or something like that.

  • Scared?

  • Dad, Don't be Neil.

  • I won't menace you because I am not a menace.

  • Hot now, huh?

  • Now that's a now.

  • That's right.

  • So we've got lots of different word forms of This is a very useful words.

  • We have the verb to menace.

  • We have the noun menace that we could be talking about.

  • There was a menace in the air.

  • That's a general feeling of something threatening or weaken.

  • Talking about a specific person, a menace.

  • You are a menace, which means you're irritating me or you're threatening me in some way.

  • We have the objective menacing zone have raised a menacing fist towards Neil or I spoke menacingly to him.

  • That's the adverb.

  • And, of course, there's the classic character.

  • You know, the one I'm talking about.

  • Oh, yeah, the British comic strip.

  • That's right.

  • Then Dennis the Menace, Dennis Red and Black Stripey.

  • Exactly.

  • Yeah.

  • What kind of person was he?

  • A menace?

  • He waas.

  • He was a kind of mischievous, irritating child who caused problems for lots and lots of people here.

  • And it's kind of used in an informal way, but I suppose hopefully with a little affection, Yes.

  • Yeah.

  • I haven't got too much affection for the dog next door instead of a menace is a bit of what does it do?

  • Well, every time I arrive home and leave the house, it you know, it tries to attach itself to my ankle.

  • Wow, a menacing little dog.

  • Indeed, indeed.

  • Let us Now move on to our next headline.

  • All right, so Our next headline comes from business inside a UK and says, We've reached the peak of Atlantic hurricane season and three hurricanes are churning at once churning.

  • Now this is talking about a liquid moving violently.

  • He exactly.

  • So we're talking about a liquid and, like you said, moving violently, mixing together if you think about what a hurricane is, a violent storm.

  • And so the ocean is spinning and whirling and mixing, and that is called churning, and it actually comes from the process of making butter.

  • You put But milk Scuse me in a churn, which is the name of the jar, and you churn the milk so you move it violently around until it becomes butter.

  • Now the word churn is really nice, because we can use it in lots of different contexts as well.

  • For example, if you're having a bad day, your mind might be churning thoughts or anxiety or stress.

  • Or maybe if you have ever been on a roller coaster, Neil, I have been on a roller coaster, and my stomach churned in two different ways.

  • Okay, go on, tell us, as we nearly reached the top, do that my stomach was churning with anxiety.

  • Those I was worried about, what was going to excuse you concede the drop, isn't it?

  • I know what's care next.

  • And then afterwards, yeah, for the drop happened.

  • My stomach was churning literally the you mean physically because I felt sick after the right.

  • Exactly.

  • So just like that, your stomach could be churning with nervousness such as before an exam.

  • Or maybe if you've eaten some bad food and your stomach is moving around violently so it can also churn.

  • Guess what?

  • What's that we've got freezer verbs to?

  • Yes, we have.

  • Right, So give me one to churn up something from the past.

  • Here we go.

  • Very nice.

  • So if you turn something up, if you think about something lying on the bottom of a river still unsettled, exactly still unsettled, so done.

  • And let's say it's gold.

  • You're looking for gold, so you churn up the river, you shake around all this liquid and earth.

  • Eventually, the gold becomes active from rises to the surface.

  • If you turn up something from the past, it means that you might mention something which has long been dealt with an unpleasant memory.

  • Certainly, yes, ample old family feud or something like that.

  • You churned that up.

  • You can also churn something out.

  • You can indeed, Yes.

  • So if we produce something in great number very, very quickly, then you are churning something out.

  • Production line off a factory churns out items left, right and center.

  • Let's move on to our next item, please.

  • All right.

  • Our last item comes from this is insider dot com and says astronauts in space just saw all three threatening hurricanes lurking in the Atlantic Ocean lurking, waiting to attack.

  • Yes.

  • So waiting in a secret way, especially for the purposes of confronting or attacking someone Now think about it in the past.

  • Way, way, way, way back when we didn't necessarily live in cities and things like that.

  • If you wanted to travel at night, you would have to be careful because danger would love about predators.

  • Bears lions.

  • Goodness knows what robbers Exactly.

  • They lurk in the dark, which means they wait there in secretly hidden get a tacky.

  • There's a sense that something can't be seen exactly.

  • And look, when we use the verbal look, we are talking in a in a dark way, negative ways.

  • If you you said someone was a lurker.

  • Yeah, it's not a good thing.

  • Yeah, if I said I saw Rob lurking around the fridge.

  • Yeah, we have.

  • Why wait?

  • He's Teoh is trying to steal the last bits of chocolate biscuits for you know that about you.

  • But by using the word like lurking, you know that I have this idea that he had bad intent, That's it.

  • Some sort of negative impression.

  • And indeed a person who looks is a lurker.

  • My mother off said to me, Why you looking around the house?

  • Go outside like go and do something useful and stop being, you know, irritating.

  • I'm trying to clean or something like that.

  • Okay, let's now have a look at our social media challenge before we have a vocabulary Recap.

  • We asked this question When an ocean storm reaches land, it makes a landing be landfall or see coasted.

  • What's the answer?

  • What was the response?

  • Okay, well, the answer is B land for if a storm makes landfall, it is the place or the action off arriving at land for the first time.

  • We can say that about people too.

  • You can make landfall on a ship so well done to everybody got it right.

  • We had a bit of a mixed response.

  • Pleased to say it's nice to get a challenge.

  • So from Instagram World on him, chump on Facebook.

  • Well done, Mohammed Ibrahim.

  • And on Twitter, well done.

  • Joe Riggan, Berg and World onto everybody else who got it right.

  • Yes, well done indeed.

  • And now just a recap, please Dan.

  • Off vocabulary.

  • Certainly we had menace threatened to hurt, churning of a liquid moving violently and lurking, waiting to attack.

  • If you would like to test yourself on this vocabulary, there's a quiz you can take on a website.

  • That's BBC learning english dot com, where you can find all kinds of other videos activities to help you improve your English.

  • And, of course, we've got an app.

  • That's right.

  • It's brand spanking new, so make sure you have check it out, free to download and free to use.

  • Thanks for joining us and good bye, Good bye.

he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

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B2 menace churn lurking hurricane landfall florence

Hurricane Florence forces evacuation: BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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