Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

  • Hi, I'm nail joining me today is Rob.

  • Hello, nice to be here.

  • Good.

  • Yes, you have a story for us.

  • I do, Yes.

  • Today story is about one of the world's greatest sporting events.

  • World's greatest sporting events.

  • What could that be without?

  • But yeah, let's find out more from this BBC World Service News Bulletin.

  • The International Olympic Committee is expected to approve bids later from both Paris and Los Angeles to host the Summer Games.

  • The IOC, meeting in the Swiss city of Lausanne, is expected to take the unusual step off, awarding both the 2024 Olympics and those for 2028.

  • So there's our story.

  • The International Olympic Committee is expected to take the unusual step later today of approving bids for two summer Olympic host cities, Paris and Los Angeles.

  • Now the main question, it seems, is who will get to go first?

  • Will it be Paris 2024 or L A 2024 or Paris, 2028 or 2028 on, By the way, for other cities Hamburg, Rome, Budapest on Boston.

  • Originally wanted to bid, but pulled out because of the high cost, right?

  • Yes.

  • Expensive stuff holding an Olympics.

  • You've been looking at this story scanning the news websites.

  • And you have picked out three words which you think will, uh, help people talk about this story.

  • Yes, that's right.

  • The words are lobbies two okay.

  • On Woo Lobbies toe.

  • Okay.

  • And woo.

  • So that 1st 1 lobbies.

  • How's that appearing in the headlines?

  • Okay, well, let's have a look at this.

  • Headline from Reuters.

  • Macron lobbies for Paris Bid L.

  • A.

  • Banks on solid candidacy lobbies.

  • So lobbies, meaning tries to persuade people in authority to take a certain action.

  • Now, Rob, as often happens, I'm a bit confused because I thought a lobby was a kind of room.

  • Yeah, well, you're not wrong.

  • It is, actually, And the origin office word is to do with the lobby.

  • A long time ago in parliament, people used to go to the lobby thistle big wide spaces between rooms to talk to the politicians and try and get into change their minds to influence them to do to take action.

  • Basically.

  • And so they were lobbying in the lobby where the word comes from, It is now a verb to lobby.

  • Yes.

  • And as you mentioned, the name of the person or the name of the activity is more being.

  • And the people who do it, they are lobbyists.

  • So the people who go into the lobby to lobby are lobbyists.

  • Okay, Now, this is quite a formal way of describing that process of persuading people, isn't it?

  • It is.

  • It is very formal.

  • We wouldn't really use in everyday language to persuade someone to do something.

  • Yeah, I wouldn't lobby my Children to do their homework, although we could say it.

  • And it's likely sort of ironic way I spoke.

  • Yes, if you wanted to make something sound more important than it.

  • Actually, Waas, Indeed.

  • Okay, great.

  • Let's move on to our next headline.

  • Yes.

  • This comes from the Los Angeles Times.

  • IOC is expected to okay, naming two winners in host race.

  • Which Olympics might go to l.

  • A.

  • So that's too okay.

  • Yes, 02 Okay.

  • Meaning to agree or give approval for something to happen now.

  • OK, is a very familiar word.

  • It's is used widely in English.

  • Andi.

  • In other languages.

  • It's a very informal world, a very in forward as well.

  • Okay, but this is slightly different.

  • The use of this is slightly different.

  • It's used in a verb to okay something.

  • Yeah.

  • And, um, as you said, I mean, okay, is normally seen as a very informal way of speaking.

  • But here we're talking about We're talking informally about something which is actually quite formal.

  • Yes.

  • So we're saying to okay, informally agree.

  • A formal agreement, a formal arrangement.

  • So it's a funny mix of an informal verb.

  • And then a very formal action.

  • Yes.

  • We could use more formal words such as approve or ratify, but to okay is another way of using it.

  • Yes.

  • And as you say, we use it to talk about formal agreements, arrangements, proposals such as this Olympic one, and we probably wouldn't use it to describe um perhaps I suggest to you Rob after this.

  • How about we go for lunch and you You say you that you need to think about whether or not Okay, this idea.

  • Okay.

  • Yes, again.

  • That would be even.

  • That sounds informed.

  • That's a very formal use of it.

  • We just use it for MAWR.

  • They say official arrangements.

  • If if a company wants to change its policy, they may okay, something.

  • But I'm not gonna Okay, going for a drink with you?

  • Probably.

  • Just say yes.

  • And of course, if we do something in the past, the past form off this verb is to have bean okayed.

  • It is okay.

  • Apostrophe d?

  • Yes, because okay.

  • Obviously it's spelt slightly differently to other words in that it is just the letters O and K.

  • That's right.

  • Okay.

  • What's your next headline?

  • Okay, well, the next headline comes from the Houston Chronicle around Sports L A.

  • Paris Woo IOC in advance on vote for 2024 28 games.

  • That's woo.

  • Okay.

  • Woo, try to persuade someone to support you by being nice to them.

  • We use this word or we have uses word a lot in romance when you woo a man or a woman, you know, very charming, because you want something.

  • Perhaps marriage the end of the day.

  • Yeah, I would woo a woman, or perhaps by buying the chocolates or flowers.

  • Something like that I have done in the past.

  • I don't That's a very romantic.

  • So are you saying that the president of France is going to buy chocolates for the members of the International Olympic Committee?

  • Will He may do that as part of the whole wooing process, but it's not just about chocolates now, because we can, you say woo in kind of any situation where you want to get a certain result So he could be doing something like taking them for dinner.

  • It could be by chocolate, but I think it be a very big box.

  • Is basically trying to keep in with people, be falsely friendly, but possibly yes.

  • Maybe there's something about that is a sense that it's perhaps a little bit false.

  • Yes, you woo someone?

  • Yes.

  • You perhaps do some sort of false action just because you want to be friends.

  • I was trying to woo the boss the other day.

  • Yes, you were.

  • You were You were upset about your your amount of pay.

  • Or so that's what I wanted to pay.

  • Arise.

  • I thought woo him so I complimented him on his clothing.

  • I took him for a drink boarding coffee every day.

  • Did it work on it?

  • didn't work.

  • Unfortunately, it was unsuccessful.

  • Woo there off the boss need to work on your wooing.

  • Yes, indeed.

  • Before we recap, we have, of course, our Facebook challenge.

  • We've been talking about persuasion agreement on approval, and so we set this question.

  • There's an expression containing a part of the body, which means to approve something.

  • It is to give something the blank.

  • Is it a fingers up?

  • Be hands up or see thumbs up?

  • Well, we've had lots of answers and cab Durex Man said he thinks the answer is B Hands up.

  • Unfortunately, he's wrong, I'm afraid, but we did get lots of right answers, Ibrahim said.

  • No doubt the correct answer is thumbs up.

  • It means to like and approve of something, Amado says.

  • Thumbs up is culturally used to approve nice things and Chardy Marlene Baba on Satyam All said it's thumbs up and of course they are correct.

  • So thumbs up to them thumbs up to them indeed and Rob, now, if you could just recap our vocabulary.

  • Yes, the words we've had our lobbies trying to or tries to persuade people in authority to take a certain action to okay is to agree or give approval for something to happen.

  • And Woo is try to persuade someone to support you by being nice to them.

  • If you would like to test yourself on today's vocabulary, there's a quiz you can take on our website at BBC Learning english dot com, where you can find other videos and all kinds of activities to help you improve your English.

  • Thanks for joining us and good bye, He's review from BBC Learning English.

he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 woo lobby formal olympic approve persuade

Olympics 2024: Paris or LA?

  • 1 0
    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
Video vocabulary