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  • he's review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review.

  • The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your every day.

  • English Hi, I'm nail Joining me today is Dan.

  • Hi, Dan.

  • Hello, everybody.

  • What have you got for us?

  • It's a story about a controversial immigration policy.

  • Okay, well, let's find out some more about that from this.

  • BBC Radio Four news bulletin.

  • The Trump Administration has firmly defended its policy off separating Children from parents who were suspected of crossing illegally from Mexico to spite widespread criticism.

  • At a White House press conference, the Homeland Security secretary, Christian Nielsen, described the United States as a country off compassion and heart.

  • She has Congress to change the law to resolve what she called an illegal immigration crisis.

  • The Democratic senator, Patrick Leahy, said the separation policy was damaging America's reputation abroad, So the United States has instituted a policy of separating Children from parents who have immigrated from Mexico illegally.

  • On there's been a lot of criticism from lots of different people all over the world on this policy.

  • The government is currently defending it, and lots of us politicians of voicing their criticisms against it as well.

  • Okay, well, you've been looking around at the various news sites on the Internet, and you've picked out three items of vocabulary.

  • What have you got?

  • We've got rebuke, backlash and standby rebuke, backlash and stand by.

  • Okay, let's hear your first headline with that word rebuke.

  • So the first headline comes from The Times of India and says, First ladies rebuked Trump for separating families at U.

  • S.

  • Border rebuke, meaning criticize someone for doing something wrong.

  • Exactly.

  • So we're talking in the context of bad behavior here, and there are a lot of synonyms that we could use instead of rebukes such as tell off, chastise or reprimand.

  • But the nice thing about rebuke is it's a very, very formal word.

  • It's not something that you would use with your Children.

  • Yeah, I'm for Neil.

  • If my kids spilt milk off something, you all over the table, I wouldn't rebuke them.

  • No, it's completely just seems you'd be an extremely extremely harsh father.

  • That's only with a very, very strong hierarchy, but in a fair, just completely out of context.

  • So it's a formal verb.

  • You rebuke somebody for doing something and you can be rebuked.

  • Of course, that is passive form and without changing its form, it's also announce, which is pretty cool, so you can give a rebuke.

  • Or you can receive a rebuke from someone we're talking about.

  • Politicians were talking about diplomacy.

  • We're talking about high level business.

  • Very, very newsy word.

  • Yeah, we're not talking about telling off kids or having a dispute with somebody in the office.

  • No, let's listen to or let's hear our next headline.

  • Our next headline comes from CTV News and says Trump defiant over border separations despite rising backlash, backlash, meaning strong negative reaction to something Exactly.

  • Now the word lash is another word for a whip.

  • You whip someone, it's likely to hurt them.

  • But a backlash would be.

  • When you fling the whip on the comes back and hits you.

  • My mistake.

  • So it is a noun, and it means a very strong, probably angry, negative public reaction to something that someone has done, usually to do with social or political change.

  • In this case, the U.

  • S.

  • Immigration policy big change for the U.

  • S.

  • Immigration policy has caused public backlash.

  • Yeah, it's often done by accident.

  • It's often something that somebody has done.

  • They didn't realize that it was gonna cause such a a big, big problem again.

  • Fairly formal.

  • You wouldn't say that.

  • There was a backlash amongst friends.

  • You know, somebody did something that others disagreed with.

  • You wouldn't say there was a backlash.

  • You could say what people fell out.

  • Yeah, you had to go into their size.

  • Exactly.

  • You disagree?

  • But there's not that kind of back backlashes.

  • U is a really big reaction.

  • Often across a very large group of people.

  • You get a backlash against somebody or something, and we often use it in compound now owns as well, which is cool.

  • So you can talk about a political backlash or a media backlash.

  • Something along those lines popular and headlines, of course, because it's quite dramatic.

  • It's got that sense of Ah, wish.

  • Yeah.

  • Ouch.

  • Watch out for the backlash.

  • Okay, let's look at our last headline then, please.

  • Okay.

  • Our last headline comes from time and says why President Trump is standing by his family separation policy standing by supporting and defending something.

  • That's correct.

  • Now, standby is a phrase Alvar herbs.

  • So we're looking at a structure which is one of herb.

  • And the second word is either a proposition or an adverb.

  • And, of course, like many froze of herbs, depending on the context, it has different meanings and stand by in particular has a lot there a lot on there really is going to concentrate on this one.

  • So we're looking just at this context.

  • So within this context, if you stand by something, you remain loyal to it and defended especially or in particularly when other people are doubting it or criticizing him.

  • Now imagine one of your friends was being criticized by a large group of people.

  • They might well be pointing their fingers at them and saying You did wrong.

  • You did bad.

  • And you want to show your friend and the people who are criticizing them that you support them.

  • Yeah, So you physically stand next to your friend.

  • You stand by your friend.

  • That way you physically show your support and defense For them.

  • The metaphorical meaning or the idiomatic meaning is exactly the same.

  • If you stand by something, it means that you defend it now.

  • A good example of the moment would be the world Cup World Cups on in the moment, let's say Goalkeeper makes a terrible mistake.

  • That's right.

  • But the manager, when he comes out afterwards, he doesn't unless he's about really bad manager, He wouldn't come out and say, Yeah, it was all his fault.

  • He would stand by his player.

  • That's right, say and support each other.

  • Good teammates stand by each other like we do.

  • We do, Yeah, If we ever make a mistake, we just stand by each other.

  • It's smooth it over.

  • Nobody, no rebuking that way.

  • Have a re capital vocabulary.

  • Of course, we have the answer to our social media challenge.

  • You put the question out earlier, Dan, a reputation based on something negative is called a prestige.

  • Be notoriety or see standing.

  • What's the answer?

  • And how is the reaction?

  • Well, the answer is B notoriety, so you get famous for doing something bad.

  • And of course, we have the adjective notorious well, which is a lovely what really rules of the time.

  • He is notorious for whatever.

  • So I'd like to say well done, people on social media feeds from Instagram, Rana said, Very well done from Facebook, we have Diana, Madeira and on Twitter.

  • We have Nanning Fowzie well done to all of you and everybody.

  • Who else who got the answer?

  • Correct.

  • It was Be notoriety.

  • Yes, well done.

  • And a recap.

  • Vocabulary, please.

  • No problem.

  • We had rebuke.

  • Criticize someone for doing something wrong.

  • We had backlash, strong negative reaction to something, and we had stand by support and defend something.

  • If you would like to test yourself on today's vocabulary, there's a quiz you can take on our website.

  • BBC Learning english dot com, which is chockablock with other videos, audio programs, quizzes, activities, things that help you improve your English.

  • Thanks for joining us and good bye, Good bye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

he's review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review.

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B2 backlash policy stand headline immigration context

US child-separation policy debate: BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
Video vocabulary