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  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

  • Hello and welcome to news Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

  • Hi, I'm Neil.

  • Joining me today is Dan.

  • Hi, Dan.

  • Hello, everybody.

  • So, what have we got?

  • We've got a story about a sporting surprise.

  • Support a sporting surprise.

  • Okay, let's find out more from this BBC World Service bulletin.

  • For the first time in 60 years, Italy have failed to qualify for the football World Cup finals.

  • The four time winners of the competition were held to a nil nil draw by Sweden in the second leg of their playoff in Milan.

  • So a bad day for Italy, whose international football team has failed to qualify for the World Cup.

  • This is strange because they're four time winners of the World Cup.

  • They drew with Sweden Nil nil that 00 And it's the first time that this has happened to them in 60 years.

  • Many of the newspapers in Italy are describing it as apocalyptic, dear, the end of the world end of the end of the footballing world.

  • That's it.

  • Okay, Well, you've been looking around at the various news and sports websites at this story, and you've picked out three words and expressions that we can use in our everyday English I have What are they?

  • Scathing, goes ballistic and goes begging.

  • Okay, scathing goes ballistic and goes begging.

  • Let's start with that 1st 1 then please.

  • So our first headline comes from gold dot com and says goodbye to the mummies who control Italian football.

  • Paolo Cannavaro in scathing attack after World Cup failure.

  • Scathing meaning strongly criticizing.

  • Exactly Now, interestingly, this is a Norse word, and we actually still have the verb today.

  • To scathe and to scathe means to hurt or to harm.

  • However, we don't use it very much, and actually it's used in its adjectival forms.

  • There to adjectival forms and scathing is one of them, which is a lovely, newsy word because it's extremely confrontational.

  • It's very aggressive, and it's very, very critical.

  • And of course, newspapers often report on what other people have said.

  • So it's an extremely useful word within the context of newspapers, and we use this when we're when we're offering a comment or an attack or a remark evaluation.

  • Exactly a user on evaluation.

  • It colic eight's very strongly with attack comment, remark and report and other things of that nature.

  • Yeah, um, we can also use the word unscathed, which means unhurt, not damaged it all.

  • Now, do you remember when we talk to the boss this morning about our new show?

  • Yeah.

  • We had an idea for a new show.

  • Yes, Cats, English with cats.

  • English forecasting, respectively.

  • The new big thing.

  • He wasn't happy, though.

  • No, no, he gave was a pretty scathing report what he thought about, all right, It was a scathing attack.

  • And it would, However, I emerged relatively unscathed.

  • Yes, you did.

  • Yeah, because you blamed it all on May so that we use the unscathed mean escape from a situation unharmed.

  • But we wouldn't say that somebody was scathed.

  • No, you can't be scathed by a football to the face or something like that.

  • It doesn't work.

  • Yeah, OK, so moving on to our next headline Our next headline comes from the sun and says, We need a win.

  • Italy midfielder Danielli de Rossi goes ballistic at coaching staff before World Cup exit.

  • So goes ballistic suddenly becomes very angry.

  • Indeed.

  • Now this is an idiom.

  • And actually the word ballistic comes from Greek and it means to throw objects.

  • And you can imagine that goes ballistic means become suddenly very angry.

  • So you can imagine somebody getting angry and throwing things around because they've lost their temper.

  • And this is a word that we associate often with missile.

  • Absolutely so missiles thes ballistic missiles are propelled, more thrown Fords.

  • And that's where the word ballistic comes, Something interesting else.

  • So excuse me.

  • Something else which is interesting is the word go in this case because obviously people know the word go meaning to travel.

  • But in this case, the word go means become so.

  • For example, if you if you're afraid of needles and you have an injection, you might go white dip or somebody can go missing A cat, for example, can go missing.

  • Yeah, synonyms of go ballistic can be see red, lose your cool or become hot under the collar.

  • Yeah, the same thing.

  • You kind of went ballistic earlier, didn't you Didn't.

  • Well, I thought English for cats was a fantastic idea personally, Yeah, but there's no need to start throwing things around.

  • Three thing it was it wasn't acceptable in the office, and I do apologize.

  • Okay, let's have a look at our last headline.

  • So our last headline comes from India today and says Italy shocked after World Cup birth goes, begging goes, begging is free to be taken.

  • That's right.

  • Now a bit confused here, Dan.

  • Okay, because I thought begging was asking for money or for food or for some form of charity.

  • Well, you're not wrong as usual, but if a person goes begging than they ask, they go out and try to find money or food or charity.

  • But if something goes begging, it means that it's free to be taken by anybody who wants it.

  • Kind of the opposite of the meaning that you expect.

  • Yeah, actually.

  • So, for example, there was a party in the office, yet a different department, not ours on DA.

  • They had a load of food left over and well, that food went begging.

  • Did it?

  • Certainly did.

  • We came downstairs and maybe asking at other sandwiches, going begging, can we?

  • And they were like, Yeah, help yourselves.

  • Yet we ate.

  • Well, that data my So it doesn't mean that the food was asking for money that would be ridiculous means that it was available was a very little people in need.

  • Indeed, anybody including beggars way have, ah recap a vocabulary.

  • We, of course, have our Facebook challenge on ditz.

  • On a sporting theme, Italy's World Cup qualifier ended nil nail.

  • Now nil means zero and is associated with football.

  • Can you match these sports to their scoring terms?

  • So here are the scoring terms first, and then I'll tell you what the sports are and we'll see how people got on.

  • So a adduce Be a try.

  • See a century d A bull's eye on the sports one archery to rugby, three cricket and four tennis.

  • So what we got?

  • Well, I'm pleased to say that people did very well.

  • First, let's cover the correct answer.

  • So adduce is associated with tennis.

  • A trying is associated with rugby.

  • A century is associated with cricket and a bull's eye is associated with archery.

  • And I've got a few people who got that right.

  • So well done.

  • Angela Bruce Eno Morales Well done, God, a cas ear Well done.

  • Sandra Clery, MD Sabah and Nikola Fermi.

  • All well done.

  • Good.

  • Good answers.

  • Yes, very good and quite a difficult one.

  • This to it?

  • Yeah.

  • Okay, so in just a recap now of vocabulary, please.

  • Certainly.

  • So first we had scathing strongly criticizing.

  • Then we had goes ballistic suddenly becomes very angry and finally we had goes begging is free to be taken.

  • If you would like to test yourself on today's vocabulary, there's a quiz you could take on our website BBC Learning english dot com, where you can find all kinds of other vizier videos and activities to help you improve your English.

  • Thanks for joining us and good bye, good bye, He's review from BBC Learning English.

He's a review from BBC Learning English.

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Italy's World Cup hopes destroyed: BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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