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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello, and welcome to news Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English Hi, I'm nail.

  • Joining me today is Katherine Katherine.

  • Hi, Nia.

  • What's our story today?

  • Story?

  • Neil is about vampires.

  • Vampires kind.

  • Okay, let's find out some more from this.

  • BBC World Service News Bulletin.

  • A new study has found that vampire bats have undergone many genetic changes to be able to live on a blood on Lee diet.

  • The three species of bats are the only mammals to feed exclusively on blood.

  • The study found that vampire bats, genes involved in immune response and metabolism are very different from the genes of other bats.

  • The study also found that the microbes in their guts are very distinct from those of the fruit and insect eating bats given vampire bats protection against diseases.

  • So a but story today now, but are those little of flying mammals.

  • Some languages call them flying mice.

  • They usually hide in the daytime.

  • They fly around at night, some but only drink or eat blood.

  • Nothing else.

  • So they at nighttime they find animals.

  • They bite them and they drink their blood.

  • And from that we get the horror film vampire legends.

  • So a study at the moment has found that vampires have a very different metabolism.

  • They have very different genes from other animals, which has helped them to survive on a blood only diet, because blood is quite poisonous.

  • A lot of the time these butts have evolved to be able to live off blood.

  • And this is a very interesting thing.

  • It is indeed.

  • Now you've been looking around at this story and picked out three words and expressions that we need to talk about this story and that we can use in our everyday English.

  • Yes, on the three words are bloodthirsty I n guts Andi, live off bloodthirsty iron guts on live off.

  • So that first word bloodthirsty was the headline.

  • Yet we'll go to BBC News.

  • The headline is D n a secret off how vampire but became bloodthirsty, bloodthirsty, meaning keen to enjoy violence.

  • Now I say that keen to enjoy violence.

  • But are these vampire bats violent?

  • Not particular.

  • Don't think they're known for violence, but they are thirsty for blood.

  • So this word blood Thursday literally means thirsty for blood.

  • And that's how that describes these.

  • But perfectly.

  • The interesting thing is, that's not how we use it in an every day since the everyday sense of the word is much more idiomatic.

  • And it means enjoying violence, enjoying watching violence, enjoying being violent so it can describe a film that has a lot of violence in it.

  • Yes, horror films.

  • Or when I am fighting films or these gangster films where everybody's getting hurt and there's blood everywhere.

  • We describe them as blood thirsty, and you could also describe a regime as blood first.

  • And most definitely some of the regimes in history have bean horrendously blood thirsty.

  • A lot of people died often because of the dictators.

  • You've got people like Stalin and Hitler in the 20th century, very famous examples off bloodthirsty leaders.

  • And again, we're not saying that these people actually drank blood.

  • No, no, exactly.

  • But they enjoyed or they perpetrated a lot of violence.

  • The bloodthirsty drinking blood is either vampire bats or the vampires from Dracula Dracula.

  • Okay, let's move on to our second headline.

  • Yep.

  • So the Australian I am guts give vampires immunity when they raid blood, bank iron guts, the ability to eat or drink anything without vomiting.

  • Okay, this was very idiomatic.

  • Your guts are your stomach and your intestines.

  • Your digestive system.

  • We call them guts.

  • Or sometimes the goat they're made off.

  • Flesh, blood, cartilage, Whatever your body's made off, they're not made of iron.

  • No, but if they were, they'd be incredibly strong.

  • Would they would.

  • And you could eat anything if you had a nine AM goat eso.

  • This idiomatic use of iron guts is when we eat food that might ordinarily makers ill.

  • So at home with you, eat something you haven't.

  • You've had some chicken on your work in your kitchen without being refrigerated for five days.

  • If you ate that and you didn't get ill, you have good have I am goods and we often use it for traveling.

  • So if you go somewhere where the food is different, the water's different.

  • It's stuff that your system isn't used too often that can make you feel ill.

  • Often you can vomit in particular.

  • You'll be sick literally.

  • You'll eat it and it will come back up again.

  • Um, Andi, if that really never happens to you weaken, Say you've got I n guts or you have or you have on Iron Goat.

  • Let's look now at our final headline, the scientist.

  • Genomic particularities hint at vampire but ability to live off blood to live off, meaning to depend on something or someone for food or money.

  • Yes.

  • And in this case, it's all about depending.

  • That's the key thing with live off you.

  • You rely on something, you're dependent on it.

  • These vampire blood, these vampire bats are dependent on blood.

  • The only thing they'd yes, it's the only thing they eat without blood.

  • They don't exist.

  • So they live off it.

  • Yeah.

  • Now it's a phrase.

  • Will verb.

  • Yep.

  • Live off.

  • And like many phrase will verbs when you change that second part, it has a really different meeting.

  • Yeah, So you've got to be careful that you don't confuse live off with live on Live on means eat basically on.

  • Everybody lives on something.

  • But if you depended on warn thing and without it, you die.

  • You live off it.

  • So with you can talk about a sort of grown up young, a grown up miles 35 years old, he's living off his parents hasn't got a job.

  • He's dependent on them.

  • We say he lives off them.

  • But if we said he lives on his parents, he would mean that he eats them.

  • That would be really weird.

  • Yeah, So live off and live on.

  • Be careful.

  • Well, as usual, we had a Facebook challenge on We gave you three idioms which contain the word blood.

  • The question waas.

  • Which one means that family is the most important type of relationship?

  • More important than friendship?

  • And we had three options.

  • A.

  • It's like getting blood from a stone.

  • Be to have blood on your hands or see blood is thicker than water.

  • So what was the response?

  • Response was very good.

  • Almost everybody got it right.

  • Three.

  • Answer was See, blood is thicker than water.

  • Turns out that this idiom exists in a lot of other languages.

  • So hever r n Abdula Abdullah said it's they have it in Arabic, Laura Puglia said.

  • They have it in Italian.

  • So well done.

  • Everybody who got this idiom OK.

  • And now a recap of the words we've looked at today.

  • Please.

  • Yes, bloodthirsty, keen to enjoy violence.

  • I n guts the ability to eat or drink anything without vomiting.

  • Andi, live off, depend on something or someone for money or fooled.

  • And if you would like to test yourself on that vocabulary, there's a quiz you can take on our website BBC Learning english dot com, where you can find all kinds of other videos and activities to help you improve your English.

  • Thank you for joining us and good bye, good bye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello, and welcome to news Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English Hi, I'm nail.

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B1 blood vampire violence thirsty iron idiomatic

How do vampire bats survive on blood? BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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