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  • Hello, and welcome to today's Grammar Gameshow!

  • I'm your host, Will!

  • But I'm no measure of intention!

  • And of course, let's not forget Leslie,

  • our all-knowing voice in the sky.

  • Hello, everyone!

  • Tonight we're going to be asking you

  • three questions about

  • Relative clauses!

  • That useful grammar

  • that allows you to modify a noun!

  • OK! Now, let's meet our contestants!

  • Hello, all.

  • My name's Levington!

  • And contestant number two?

  • Hi, it's nice to meet you.

  • I'm Kate!

  • Great!

  • Nice to see you again, Levington.

  • Let's get going, and don't forget

  • you can play along at home too.

  • Our first round is a quick-fire round.

  • Look at this picture, and complete the sentence

  • with the correct relative pronoun.

  • Here we go!

  • This is a guy _____ spoke to me on the bus.

  • Who.

  • This is a guy who spoke to me on the bus.

  • Correct!

  • These are the trees ______ I planted last year.

  • Which.

  • These are the trees which I planted last year.

  • Correct!

  • That is the lady _____ I saw eating lunch.

  • 'Who' again.

  • That is the lady who I saw eating lunch.

  • Correct!

  • Here is the building ______ is in the middle of town.

  • Which.

  • Here is the building which is in the middle of town.

  • Correct!

  • Well done both of you!

  • And for a bonus point,

  • tell me in which of these sentences

  • can the relative pronoun 'who'

  • or 'which'

  • be replaced with 'that'?

  • All of them!

  • Correct!

  • Leslie?

  • Good job.

  • Defining relative clauses such as these

  • specify which noun we are talking about.

  • They use the relative pronouns 'who' and 'which'.

  • 'Who' is for people,

  • and 'which' is for things.

  • However,

  • in this type of relative clause,

  • both 'who' and 'which'

  • can always be replaced by 'that'.

  • Just remember, it's a bit less formal.

  • Levington, four points for you. And Kate,

  • it's ladies' night at my favourite club

  • so eight points for you!

  • Why is that important?

  • Oh, Levington.

  • I see chivalry truly is dead.

  • I suppose you don't give up your seat to

  • a lady on the bus either.

  • Minus two points for you . No, no!

  • Question two.

  • In addition to 'who', 'that' and 'which',

  • the relative pronoun 'whose'

  • can also be used.

  • But why is 'whose' different to 'who', 'which' and 'that'?

  • Look at this sentence and tell me.

  • I have a friend whose car is a Ferrari.

  • 'Whose' is different because it describes a possession.

  • Unlike 'who', 'which' and 'that',

  • it cannot be used without being followed by a noun.

  • Leslie?

  • Right again, Levington!

  • 'Whose' is a determiner, like 'my' or 'your'.

  • Despite being a relative pronoun,

  • it must be followed by a noun.

  • We cannot say,

  • 'I have a friend whose is a Ferrari'.

  • It must be 'whose car is a Ferrari'.

  • Well done, Levington.

  • However, this is a negative points round.

  • Minus six points to you.

  • Oh!

  • I would graciously like to give my points

  • for this round to Kate.

  • That's very gentlemanly of you!

  • And because it's ladies' night,

  • all her points are increased,

  • so Kate,

  • Levington gives you 100 points!

  • But

  • It's time for our last question.

  • Look at these four sentences and tell me

  • in which two the relative pronoun can be left out.

  • Leslie: I've never seen a man who can dance like him.

  • He met a friend who he invited to lunch.

  • Libraries are buildings that lend you books.

  • It's definitely a job which I wouldn't want to do.

  • b) He met a friend he invited to lunch.

  • And, d)

  • It's definitely a job I wouldn't want to do.

  • Leslie?

  • You're dead right, Kate.

  • When the relative pronoun

  • represents the object of the relative clause,

  • such as in sentences b) and d),

  • it can be left out.

  • However,

  • if it represents the subject of the relative clause,

  • such as in a) and c),

  • it cannot be left out.

  • Well done Kate!

  • Another hundred points to you.

  • I'd like to give them to Levington.

  • He's doing so badly.

  • I think he needs the help.

  • So generous of you!

  • Very well!

  • Levington, Kate gives you the points.

  • You get

  • five points!

  • Well that brings us to the end of today's

  • Grammar Gameshow.

  • Let's count out the points

  • and the winner is

  • Lockdown!

  • Well, I never!

  • It's a lockdown!

  • That means no winner is declared this show

  • and we have to wait until next time to play again!

  • Kate and Levington

  • will both be staying here until the next show.

  • What!?

  • Oh, don't worry.

  • It doesn't get that cold in here over the weekend,

  • or so I'm told anyway.

  • I'm off home.

  • Say goodbye, Leslie!

  • Adios, Leslie!

Hello, and welcome to today's Grammar Gameshow!

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A2 relative kate leslie pronoun correct relative clause

Relative Clauses: The Grammar Gameshow Episode 11

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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