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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to news Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

  • I'm Dan and joining me this morning is Katherine.

  • Hi, Catherine.

  • Hello, Dan.

  • Hello, everybody.

  • So what's our story about?

  • Well, today we're not talking about a large data theft, which is the result of hacking.

  • Okay, well, let's hear more from this.

  • BBC World Service news report The US based financial services company Capital One has revealed that the personal details of over 100 million individuals in North America have been stolen.

  • The hacks data includes names, addresses and phone numbers of people who applied for credit card products.

  • The U S Justice Department says a former Seattle technology company software engineer has been arrested in connection with the breach.

  • So US based financial company Capital One has bean hacked.

  • Now it looks like 100 million more than 100 million people have had their data stolen.

  • They are based in North America and Canada only.

  • Apparently somebody has been arrested for this on suspicion of committing this crime.

  • The FBI found this person because she was talking about what has happened online, huh?

  • Yeah.

  • Interesting.

  • Very OK.

  • Well, we've got three words and expressions that people can use to talk about this story.

  • What do we have for them?

  • Catherine?

  • We have exposed.

  • Be caught up in something Andi boasted exposed.

  • Be caught up in something and boasted.

  • Okay, Can we have our first headline, please?

  • We can.

  • So we're looking at RT 100 million plus people's data exposed in Capital one bank Huck, thousands of SS ends on accounts leaked, exposed, made visible or vulnerable.

  • So what kind of word is exposed?

  • Well, it's a operating here is a verb, but in the headline it's used in the passive form.

  • People's data has bean exposed, but the newspapers taken out the has bean, as newspapers do.

  • It comes from the berg verb expose e x p o s e.

  • And if you expose something, you make it visible.

  • You make it, you uncover it.

  • Okay.

  • Like on electrician with wires in a plug.

  • Well, you don't want exposed wires.

  • Very electrical plugs of what we do is we cover them so they're not exposed on electrician's in the course of his or her work will expose these wires, put them together and then cover them up again.

  • And, of course, exposed is also the adjective.

  • So you could say, Be careful of those exposed wires.

  • Absolutely.

  • Yes, it works like that on.

  • Yeah, it means you protect something from exposure, which is the known form.

  • A swell as a physical aspect of making something visible.

  • The idea is also about vulnerability, or something is unprotected.

  • If you're exposed, your unprotected, your you can be damaged or harmed in some way.

  • We often talk about this in connection with a sort of weather.

  • Yes, absolutely.

  • So if you're exposed to the weather, you're not protected from it.

  • If you're out in very hot sun, very strong, son, you need to use sunscreen to because your skin is exposed to the harmful rays from the sun.

  • And, of course, if you're in an extremely cold environment, for example, on your subject to the wind, the rain to this way you're exposed to them.

  • You can die off exposure.

  • You can indeed die off exposure.

  • Yes, and that's a condition where your body can't cope with extreme cold and wet weather.

  • So how does this relate to credit cards and finances.

  • Well, it's about the protection side of things and the vulnerability side of things.

  • So you expect a bank to keep your data or a financial institute to keep your data safe and protected.

  • But if somebody is able to break that defense on sea access, your data, your data, your information is exposed and therefore at risk, at risk of being stolen and used for terrible things and all the rest of it.

  • So yeah, it's the idea of exposure or being exposed.

  • Here is it's security has been broken on, is vulnerable to attack.

  • Thank you very much for explaining that and exposing all that information.

  • Let's move on to our second headline.

  • Okay, we're going now to Zet de Net.

  • 100 million Americans and six million Canadians caught up in Capital One breach be caught up in something become involved in often unintentionally.

  • Now I'm familiar with catch up which, of course, is the phrase of world that often means, like come to the same level.

  • But this isn't the same.

  • How is this different?

  • Well, court up, See, a U G H T court up is the passive form of catch up, but it's to be caught up in something, and that means to be involved in a situation.

  • And if you think e, I think the good idea is to think of a net or fishing.

  • If you're going fishing for fish, you never know.

  • Use a net.

  • The fish swim into the net.

  • They get tangled, they get trapped, they can't move.

  • And suddenly you have them that they're caught, they're trapped.

  • Okay, so it's about if you take that and think about it is you magically you become involved in the situation that you can't control.

  • You can't escape from it.

  • Your trapped your exposed in fact.

  • So this situation wasn't something that you wanted?

  • Absolutely.

  • It wasn't wanted.

  • It's unintentional.

  • It's unwilling it often you don't expect the situation, and often it could be quite annoying.

  • If you're caught up in a situation, it's one that you didn't want.

  • Now, of course, in the headline again, they don't use the auxiliary verb e, but it is there.

  • Oh, yes, it says, just taking it out of the headline, and you can also use the verb get to get caught up in something so you could be having a very nice innocent day down walking down the street.

  • All of a sudden masked Raiders come running out of a bank.

  • Your steppin superhero down Probably cower in the corner.

  • But yes, I'm certainly.

  • And get involved Before you know it, you're at the police station.

  • You're in court, you're given evidence.

  • You're on the witness protection program.

  • Gosh, all because you got caught up in a situation that you weren't expecting and you didn't want No, we make a good excuse for being late for work.

  • That wouldn't when I let you off for that, I appreciate that.

  • Thank you.

  • Thank you for explaining that.

  • Let's move on to our next headline.

  • But before we do, are you interested in learning more about hacking and online fraud?

  • Because this week, six minute English talked about online fraud and gave some tips on how to protect yourself from it.

  • Isn't that right, Katherine?

  • Yes, You can expose your soldiers and fantastic vocabulary.

  • Just click on the link in the comments below and it'll take is straight to the episode.

  • That's right.

  • It's so interesting.

  • You'll be caught up in it.

  • You will.

  • Hot right.

  • Let's move on to our third and final headline en de TV.

  • US woman boasted off.

  • Must've credit card data theft online.

  • Arrested, boasted, spoke proudly about something.

  • Now is a verb.

  • Yes, it is.

  • Boast b o A S t and the past is boasted.

  • So boasted means to talk proudly about something you've done or something you got.

  • I see eso we've got with speaking and we've got pride is a is a good thing.

  • Well, you might think is good if you're doing the boasting But usually people who are on receiving this boasting or seeing or hearing it usually kind of who to say things.

  • It is not always in a positive things.

  • I look at me guys aren't I grazia so it can come across as arrogant.

  • It comes across as arrogant.

  • Another word for boasting is the face of showing off to show off its look at me.

  • Everybody on I great.

  • In this case, it's backfired on this bosom on.

  • She got called.

  • Yes, it's showing off about what things you've done.

  • So what kind of propositions can be used?

  • You can boast about something you can boast off something or you can boast that something has happened.

  • So the prime minister boasted that crime figures have never bean so low.

  • Very nice example down.

  • So do you like to boast?

  • I'm very modest, Stan.

  • I hate to bro my own trumpet.

  • Oh, that's a nice expression.

  • Does that mean the same thing it does?

  • It's a lovely expression to blow your own Trumpet is another way of boasting is an amuse boasting, but we often use it when we're going to boast.

  • And it's a way of minimizing the fact that we're going to talk proudly about ourselves.

  • So you say, Oh, I don't mean to blow my own trumpet, but everything I do say or have is fantastic.

  • That's exactly how it works.

  • Yes, there's a cultural element is, well, different.

  • Cultures have different feelings about saying how great they are.

  • You'll hear it, but it's got to go a lot now.

  • Forgive me.

  • There's another meaning of post, isn't that yes, there is.

  • It's related meaning, but it is when you describe good things, and this is when you're not kind of saying, look at me, how fantastic you're just going.

  • This is available and it's a good thing.

  • So if you're looking in something like a holiday brochure, you will see the word boast as a verb.

  • A subject.

  • Boast objects.

  • And it might be.

  • For example, the island boasts many beautiful golf courses.

  • Senate say we have this on.

  • It's good.

  • Yeah, and it's not used continuously.

  • There isn't you don't say This island is boasting on the beautiful golf courses.

  • Thank you very much.

  • Now, could you please recap vocabulary?

  • Most certainly we have exposed, made visible, visible or vulnerable, be caught up in something become involved in often unintentionally.

  • Aunt Boasted, spoke proudly about something.

  • Thank you very much, Katherine.

  • Now, if you'd like to test yourself in today's vocabulary, well, our website boasts a quiz that you can take to challenge yourself.

  • And, of course, we are everywhere on social media.

  • So don't forget to check us out on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube, and we boast an app.

  • It's free to download and free to use so you can get caught up in that wherever you are in the world.

  • Thank you very much for joining us and good bye, good bye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

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he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to news Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

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B1 exposed boasted boast caught data headline

Capital One hack: 100 million people's data stolen - News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
Video vocabulary