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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

  • I'm Catherine and joining me today is Tom.

  • Hello, Tommy.

  • Hello, Katherine.

  • On What's our story today?

  • Today's story is a about cyber security.

  • Okay, and let's hear some more from BBC World Service News.

  • The British Authority Tackling cybercrime is given details of the extent to which the countries facing constant threats.

  • The National Cybersecurity Center says it's confronting more than 10 cyber attacks in the UK every week.

  • So this story is from the part of the government about concern for cybersecurity, and they say that they are stopping up to 10 cybersecurity alerts or attacks every week.

  • Okay, on, we've got three words and expressions that you found in the media that we're going to look at today related to this story.

  • Correct the three expressions and words.

  • I have code warts.

  • Andi doesn't pay cold thwarts.

  • Andi doesn't pay.

  • Can you take us your first headline?

  • Of course I can't.

  • My first headline is from New Electron ICS, and it says government publishes code to help manufacturers boost cybersecurity cold a system or collection off rules or guidelines.

  • So is this about the kind of computer program and cold Are we talking about C plus plus and HTML?

  • And although things for programming computers here, it's interesting because co does mean that.

  • But in this headline code refers to a collection or system of rules.

  • Um, that help us to behave so rules for behavior, not rules for computer programming.

  • In this headline Not in this headline.

  • No, it's about behavior and conduct.

  • Tell us more eso something we often see with code is a code of conduct.

  • This is a system of rules or guidelines about how we conduct ourselves and how we behave in a certain situation.

  • Okay, we have a code of conduct here at the BBC.

  • Don't way.

  • We do.

  • Yes.

  • I hope you're sticking to it, Tom.

  • I am in public.

  • No shouting, no throwing things across the office.

  • I should hope not.

  • You did.

  • Upon time.

  • You do your job Well, you polite to people.

  • Everybody operates within the code.

  • Exactly that I've been looking.

  • Is there something about biscuits dealing in the BBC code of conduct I don't think there's anything written in the code.

  • I think it might be an unspoken fight trying, but I'm sure it's in there somewhere of Rob trying.

  • Get any other things that go Any other kind of codes of behavior that we've got?

  • Yes, we can have a highway code, which is driving.

  • It's our code of behaviour systems of behavior on the highways.

  • So you can't go too fast.

  • Yeah, you can't smash into anybody.

  • Good idea.

  • You have to be polite on the road.

  • OK?

  • Eso if we come back.

  • Teoh, this is this is all about rules and instructions.

  • So is there actually a link between code code?

  • In the sense of the headline on this computer programming idea?

  • That is a good question.

  • And the answer is yes.

  • There is a link between the kind of code in the headline we will talk about and computer programming.

  • The link is a Siri's off instructions.

  • So a computer code is a series of instructions or a system of instructions which a computer can understand.

  • Okay.

  • Thank you so much.

  • Tom, can we have your second headline?

  • We definitely can.

  • The second headline is from BBC News and it says UK cyber center floor wort Hostile hackers.

  • Swartz What a words.

  • Nice pronunciation war.

  • How do you spell it?

  • T h w a r t s And it's the a r that make the allow lovely word with lots of continents in it.

  • Yes.

  • So tell us about thwart.

  • We have a definition here, which is prevents.

  • Opposes successfully on frustrates.

  • Yes.

  • So if I want to thwart somebody or if I thwart somebody, I stopped them from doing what they want to do.

  • Okay?

  • In the headline.

  • Yep.

  • The UK Cyber Center has thwarted the hackers.

  • It has stopped the hackers from doing the cyber attack that they wanted to do.

  • Okay.

  • So you can stop someone from doing something.

  • Is it always something bad you stop them from doing?

  • No, it's neutral.

  • And it depends what perspective you're looking from.

  • Okay, in the headline for the UK it's good We've thwarted the hackers though hackers have bean thwarted.

  • We don't want cyberattacks.

  • The hackers is bad.

  • I wanted to do the cyberattack, so it's neither positive nor negative.

  • Got it?

  • And you knew I notice a passive in there.

  • You said the hackers have bean thwarted.

  • Is this a word we use often?

  • Impossible.

  • We very often see impassive form.

  • And we also have some high frequency words that come with it.

  • Right, Which Ah, you can thwart someone's attempts.

  • Thought an attempt.

  • Yeah.

  • You could thwart an attempt to attack the UK.

  • Yep.

  • And you could also thwart someone's plans.

  • Got it?

  • So you could The object can be a person or a thing.

  • You can thought a person or you can thwart a thing like a plan.

  • Exactly.

  • Tell us.

  • When you last thwarted a plant here, the BBC part of our code of conduct, you could say the unspoken part is that one of the newest members of staff needs to organize the Christmas party.

  • That's the BBC learning English studies a BBC Lenny.

  • Okay, um, now, I would be you this year to be made could be me.

  • It could be one of the other newer members.

  • Um, I realized this on I realized editor was going toe ask about it in the office.

  • So when he was about to ask Yeah, I left.

  • I went and made myself a cup of tea, and I was out of the room.

  • Tom I could.

  • You I thwarted editor editors.

  • Plans were thwarted.

  • And it's good for me because I don't have to plan the Christmas.

  • There's always next year.

  • Can we have your next headline?

  • Please don't.

  • My next and final headline, of course, is from the Law Society of Scotland.

  • And it says giving crypto currency to making sure cyber crime doesn't pay doesn't pay, does not provide a reward, monetary or otherwise.

  • Now it's interesting that there's currency in the title.

  • Yes, but doesn't pay, doesn't necessarily need to involve currency, and money comes from the expression.

  • Crime doesn't pay, then that's a fixed phrase, isn't it?

  • It's a very common British expression.

  • To say that something doesn't pay is a fixed expression.

  • Okay, so there's no benefit in crying.

  • You might make something in the short term, but in the long term, exactly if you commit a crime, maybe you'll get some small amount of money and you'll do it two or three times and you will be caught.

  • And yet you got court and then you lose all the benefits.

  • Yeah, it's bad for us, but from May, it's bad for society.

  • There's no reward.

  • It doesn't pay Okay, So in the headline is saying that they're using different types of money to make sure that we're fighting these cyber criminals.

  • Yeah, it's Inter.

  • They've contrasted the two meanings It doesn't pay.

  • Thea article is about the way that we pay for things and Janice, how we need to make sure that our cybersecurity is made stronger by the way we pay to make sure that crime and cyber crime doesn't.

  • And that was a typical headlining thing is that they like to contrast different users of phrases in this case money.

  • They're using a money idea to kind of write a nice headline Exactly, and it grabs your attention.

  • And you think, Oh, this looks interesting and you read on Excellent, thank you very much.

  • And if you'd like to test yourself on today's vocabulary, there's a quiz you can take on our website BBC Learning english dot com, where you'll find lots of other fantastic stuff to help you improve your English.

  • You can also find us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Instagram Onda.

  • We have an apple as well.

  • They're just so many ways you can improve your English.

  • Do not be thwarted in your attempts to get better.

  • We're here for you.

  • Thank you very much on We'll see you next time.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

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B1 headline cyber cybersecurity pay conduct computer

Stopping the cyber-criminals: BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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