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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English I'm Dan and joining me today is Katherine.

  • Hi Catherine.

  • Morning down.

  • So once our story today is a story about a problem with an upcoming wedding on upcoming wedding that sounds mysterious.

  • I wonder which one that is.

  • One who knows.

  • So let's hear more about the story from this World Service news bulletin.

  • There's uncertainty whether Megan Marco's father will attend Saturday's wedding between his daughter and Prince Harry, the sixth in line to the British throne.

  • It follows reports that Thomas Markle cooperated with a paparazzi photographer to pose for pictures.

  • Mr.

  • Markel had been expected to walk his daughter down the aisle, but he is now reported to have told journalists that he has decided not to go.

  • So there's a big wedding happening in the UK this weekend.

  • Prince Harry is going to marry Meghan Markle, but at the moment it seems that Megan's father has decided not to go to the wedding.

  • Now this apparently is due to, amongst other reasons, he posed for some photos with a paparazzi on.

  • Reports are saying he's decided not to go now.

  • It's Tuesday today, the wedding's on Saturday.

  • So we'll have to wait and see whether or not he does turn up to the wedding.

  • Okay, well, you've got three words and expressions that we've been used to talk about this story.

  • What have you got for us today?

  • We have today Fiasco Bales, Andi, Frantic fiasco Bales and frantic Wow, Good words.

  • Okay, so let's have our first headline then, please.

  • Okay, so we'll go to CBS Miami.

  • The headline is Meghan.

  • Marco's dad won't attend Royal Wedding after staged photo fiasco, fiasco complete embarrassing failure.

  • Now fiasco.

  • That doesn't sound like a very British word.

  • What kind of word is that?

  • It comes from Latin originally.

  • Okay, it's a countable noun, although usually hopefully there's only one fiasco at a time.

  • On it describes a situation where things go really, really badly wrong.

  • On were often it's imp public.

  • We often there's a lot of people who see things going badly wrong.

  • So we after news it about events like parties, weddings, business president presentations, sporting events where it's all planned it goes horribly wrong.

  • Everyone sees it and you're completely embarrassed.

  • And we often actually smart.

  • Funny.

  • You mentioned completely, isn't it?

  • Because we often use that word in describing the fiasco.

  • We say it was a complete fiasco.

  • Total fiasco.

  • Utter an utter fiasco.

  • Yes, that's the one.

  • Yeah, any synonyms.

  • What could we say?

  • Instead of fiasco, we can say something's at Deb Arkle.

  • We can say it's a Tass trophy, but it really it's in.

  • It's horrendously embarrassing it.

  • Every time you think of it, you go.

  • Oh, my God, I can't believe that happened.

  • Yeah, a little bit like Neil near and the old English for cats.

  • English recap.

  • So he finally convinced us this can happen.

  • So we said, OK, Neil, give it a shot.

  • Yeah.

  • Got studio.

  • Got the cat.

  • A crew of 30 people ready, waiting to film.

  • Turns out the cats can't pronounce English very well.

  • Carpet outs, English.

  • It was an absolute fiasco, was still talking about it.

  • Now.

  • Every time we do, he groans inside and we'll start laughing.

  • Fiasco right before this turns into a complete fiasco.

  • Let's move on to our second headline.

  • Okay, we're looking now at Newsweek The headline Who Is Thomas Markle?

  • Meghan Markle is Dad bails on Royal Wedding Bales quits before the end.

  • Now Bales is an interesting word, isn't it?

  • Because I know quite a few meaning of bales.

  • I mean, there's a cricket related meaning.

  • There's a kind of, AH meaning related to the justice system law.

  • Is this anything to do with that?

  • No, it isn't.

  • This one's got a different meaning.

  • It means to leave or stop doing something before it's finished.

  • So in this case, the royal wedding hasn't happened.

  • But Meghan markings Marco's dad 1/4 to this headline, has bailed on.

  • It means he's left before the process has completed.

  • Okay, and this is a noun or a verb.

  • It's a verb.

  • It's a verb.

  • Yeah, it is.

  • It's unformed.

  • It's, um, informal.

  • We often use it without an object, so you can just bail.

  • But if you want to add the object, you can bail on something or you can bail on someone.

  • So here that the object is the royal wedding and we use the proposition on to join it, okay, And what other kind of situations to be bailed on any kind of arrangement.

  • Really?

  • You can bail on a job.

  • You can bail on a relationship.

  • You can bail on party.

  • You convey lots of anything that sort of planned.

  • You said you were gonna do it often.

  • People are relying on you.

  • So if you bail on something, it's always negative.

  • You leave people unhappy, you leave them disappointed.

  • You leave them wondering where you are.

  • So it's it's People are never happy if you bail so done.

  • Have you ever bailed on everything?

  • It's funny.

  • You should ask me there.

  • Ah, yes, once.

  • And I'm not proud to say this, but once I bailed on a job after only three days Yeah, it was I was desperate for a job at the time.

  • It was just off the university.

  • Andi.

  • I took a job selling insurance door to door to door, you know, and it just it didn't suit me.

  • It'll and after three days, I just went up to the manager and said, Live really can't do this anymore.

  • I'm sorry.

  • And I left.

  • So you didn't give him any warning?

  • One week's notice.

  • You just said I'm out of here.

  • Just said Sorry, man.

  • I gotta bail was I was out of that right.

  • Let's bail on this headline and move along to our 3rd 1 Okay, on the mirror headline is frantic.

  • Meghan Markle pleads with dad to walk her down.

  • I'll after claims his pulled out of royal wedding on the inverted commas around.

  • The word frantic on the phrase pleads with Dad to walk her down.

  • I'll show that this is a quote from some source, frantic out of control with extreme emotion.

  • What can you tell me about that?

  • Her frantic M.

  • It's an objective you can also have.

  • The adverb frantically comes from the word that means insanity.

  • Crazy, it means you're crazy on.

  • In this case, it means you're crazy with worry, with panic with anxiety.

  • So if you do so, if you do something frantically running around, you're almost out of control because you're worried or you're panicking.

  • There's this idea of sort of great speed and great activities, and there you can have a frantic day at work.

  • Yes, all over the place.

  • You got so much to do.

  • You just worried about everything.

  • Yes, yes, yes, is worry.

  • It's panic.

  • It's movement, it's rushing around.

  • It's too much to do you?

  • You're scared.

  • You worried?

  • Yes, it's either movement or it's a feeling that you have.

  • Yeah, okay.

  • And there any other situations in which you can be friends?

  • Lots of lots of them and there can be.

  • And it's a really useful word for any situation.

  • With panic, you can have frantic trading on the stock market when there's a company in trouble or something.

  • If there's a natural disaster, there will be for frantic rescue attempt.

  • Um, if you need to be somewhere and the traffics really bad, you can be frantic thinking.

  • I'm gonna miss my train.

  • I'm going to miss my plane.

  • So it could be lots and lots of situations that people could be frantic or they can do something frantically.

  • You look like you've got an example that just going to say it kind of reminds me of another little story from my outed.

  • Absolutely true.

  • When I was six, my parents took me to a very famous Funfair theme park, America on While we were there, I saw the most beautiful little ride along toy car.

  • You know, you put the money in and yeah, it affords, and I love this car So I had a couple of rides, and then my mom said No.

  • Come on, Off we go.

  • We gotta go.

  • And later on, I decided to go back to the car, but not tell my parents.

  • Three hours of frantic searching later, my mother found me at the car staring at it, waiting for somebody to give me money to get for another.

  • Right.

  • So how did that meeting go then, Dan?

  • Uh, well, she was relieved to see me, but then she gave me a really good smack on the bottom not to leave her side again.

  • Um, yeah, I was quite a big theme park, so she was frantic with worry.

  • She searched frantically.

  • Exactly about you never did that again.

  • I learned a very, very serious lesson there.

  • Right.

  • So before we recap the vocabulary, let's go to our social media challenge.

  • Now, this morning we posted who takes photos of celebrities to sell to newspapers and magazines.

  • Is it a shutterbugs?

  • Be photojournalists or see papparazzi?

  • How did they do?

  • Katherine did pretty well done.

  • Lots of correct answers from all our platforms on Facebook.

  • We had Kinchen can't knee Niermann, Sudar, Amini, Twitter, Martin Jr.

  • Akiko for Instagram, Anju annual Janita and She Maza, who all said answers, See, paparazzi, That's a photo.

  • Excuse me, That's a photographer who specializes in following celebrities.

  • Yes, of course.

  • The answer.

  • A shutterbugs is an informal way of talking about someone who likes taking photographs, possibly as a hobby.

  • And, of course, photojournalists would be a journalist who uses photographs to tell a story.

  • Right?

  • Can we have a quick recap of the vocabulary place we can?

  • We had fiasco complete embarrassing failure.

  • Bales quits before the end, frantic out of control due to extreme of ocean.

  • Thank you very much.

  • Now, if you'd like to test yourself on today's vocabulary, there is a quiz that you can take on our website.

  • That's BBC learning english dot com, where you will find all sorts of amazing stuff to help you learn English.

  • So make sure that you check it out.

  • Thank you very much for joining us and good bye, good bye.

he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English I'm Dan and joining me today is Katherine.

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Harry and Megan: Mr Markle may not attend royal wedding: BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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