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  • He's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review.

  • The program where we give you the language You need to talk about the news.

  • Hi, I'm nail and joining me today is Sean.

  • Sean.

  • What's our story?

  • Hey, the story today is about something very, very big that has been built in China.

  • Something big has been built in China.

  • Is it a wall?

  • It's not a wall.

  • It's a different shape.

  • Okay, let's find out some.

  • Or from this BBC World Service News bulletin.

  • China has completed the installation of the world's largest radio telescope.

  • The last panel was fitted into the center of the giant dish located on a remote mountain in the southwestern province of Grey Joe.

  • So a huge radio telescope has just been built on a mountain in China.

  • Okay, well, sounds interesting.

  • Let's have a look at some of the language that's been used to talk about that story.

  • You've been looking around.

  • What have you found?

  • Okay, so I've picked out three words.

  • Okay.

  • The first word well, is a group of words, and they are massive.

  • Gigantic giant.

  • Okay, on the second is extraterrestrial.

  • On 1/3 is eavesdrop So massive, gigantic giant.

  • All words meaning very, very big extraterrestrial meaning coming from outside of planet Earth and eavesdrop that secretly listen to secretly listen to a conversation.

  • Um, yes, to secretly listen to the conversation.

  • So, Sean, how are these words appearing in the media?

  • Okay, so the first group of words all mean very, very big on because it's such an enormous telescope.

  • The media has been emphasizing that with synonyms.

  • So, for example, in the GP times we have in the headline China's massive 500 meter fast telescope ready to search the skies in September.

  • So we have massive meaning very, very big.

  • And in the same article we have in the first paragraph, new photos show that China's gigantic 500 meter Yeah, Dishman again, we have another word meaning very, very big.

  • We have a few of these and they're all in all of these articles.

  • So we got gigantic, huge, enormous, humongous, massive, humongous jaw, Enormous.

  • China misses a combination between gigantic and enormous, slightly childish word.

  • Quite.

  • Yeah, yeah, I think it's becoming more common nowadays.

  • Enormous.

  • There's an interesting thing with these extreme adjectives.

  • Isn't there s So you can't use theater very because they already extreme, so we can't grade them.

  • So instead of saying very enormous, you would say absolutely enormous.

  • Extremely, extremely.

  • Yeah, Yeah.

  • You can't say very enormous.

  • No.

  • Okay.

  • What have you got next?

  • Okay, so the next word we have is extraterrestrial andan The telegraph we have work has finished on the world's largest radio telescope, which will hunt for extra terrestrial life and explore space so extra here as a prefix means outside or beyond.

  • So extraterrestrial is outside planet Earth Aliens E t.

  • Which in fact is extra terrestrial.

  • Yes, yes, e t the alien Andi don't have to use it just for space so we can use extra.

  • For example, extraordinary is beyond ordinary.

  • There's a strange word, isn't there?

  • When Children at school do something outside of the normal activities, they are part of a club.

  • They're called curricula activities.

  • Yes, a music for example, A swell extracurricular outside off the curricula outside the normal syllabus.

  • Okay, what's next?

  • Okay.

  • And the final word is eavesdrop, though in the Crusader journal, we have the headline China to develop giant radio telescope to eavesdrop from potential alien life.

  • So we have another word meaning big here, Giant and eavesdrop.

  • Yes, so to eavesdrop is it's quite a negative word, really, isn't it?

  • Well, if you have your eavesdropping, you're listening to someone's conversation, but secretly, they don't know about it.

  • So I guess it's strange, for this is.

  • Obviously this telescope is not very secretive.

  • It's enormous.

  • But if the idea is that we're gonna be secretly listening in to aliens on other planets by using this word as drama, doesn't it?

  • That's a kind of typical thing you'll find in headlines words that are dramatic in order to make the whole thing more exciting.

  • Exactly, and the same with extreme adjectives.

  • It's all toe bills, drama, but eavesdrop, you don't We can use just to describe a conversation when you're listening into someone's conversation.

  • For example, if you're on the bus and you're listening to the people behind you, your eavesdropping.

  • Yes, Okay, well, let's have ah, little bit more on this story from the BBC's Celia Hatton.

  • It's difficult to overstate the size of China's new radio telescope.

  • With a diameter of 500 meters, it equals 30 football fields or has one of its creators explains.

  • If The dish like telescope was filled with wine.

  • Every individual on Earth about seven billion people could drink about five bottles from it.

  • The radio telescope will function like a giant ear detecting sounds from far off Galaxies.

  • Scientists say the new instrument will explore distant places like never before, finding new stars and even searching for alien life.

  • The BBC's signature hat in there Do you were drink wine from a telescope, Sean.

  • I never have.

  • But I'm amazed by how much wine you can get from this telescope is very interesting comparison.

  • Okay, it's time for our Facebook challenge.

  • We set this question to our Facebook followers.

  • We've been looking at extreme adjectives, and we put up a picture of an extremely clean kitchen.

  • Was it your kitchen?

  • Wasn't my kitchen?

  • No, it wasn't on.

  • DWI asked the question.

  • Which extreme adjective means very, very clean.

  • Is it a minuscule?

  • Be hideous or see spotless?

  • What sort of response did we get?

  • Well, I like all homes response, he says.

  • Sorry, I was distracted by the beautiful kitchen in the picture, which is a good answer.

  • But the majority people did get it correct.

  • It was spotless, so spotless.

  • Meaning very, very clean.

  • Yes.

  • So clean that there isn't a single spot exactly on the other two.

  • Minuscule meaning.

  • Very, very small, Tiny and hideous.

  • Meaning very ugly.

  • Okay, well, let's move away from very ugly onto a summary.

  • Off the words we've looked at.

  • Okay, so we looked at some synonyms for very, very big, for example, massive, gigantic, giant and huge on relooked at extraterrestrial meaning coming from outside planet Earth.

  • And finally eavesdrop to secretly listen to a conversation.

  • Yes, well, people don't need to secretly listen to us.

  • They can find us on our website, BBC Learning english dot com where there's all sorts of materials to help people with their English.

  • Thanks for joining us.

  • And good bye.

  • Good bye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

He's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review.

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B2 telescope enormous secretly extraterrestrial gigantic china

BBC News Review: World's largest telescope

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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