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  • He's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we give you the words and phrases to help you talk about the news.

  • Hi, I'm Sean.

  • And with me in the studio today is Katherine.

  • Hi, Katherine.

  • Hi, John.

  • What story do you have for us today?

  • Today?

  • Shall we have a story about an ending rule?

  • Can you guess what it is?

  • Let's listen and find out.

  • The Olympic Games have officially ended with a colorful ceremony in the American our stadium in Rio de Janeiro.

  • The entertainment included Brazil's world famous samba music.

  • President of the Rio Organizing Committee Carlos off The newsman said he was proud of his city, his country and his people to most bark, President of the International Olympic Committee, said there had been a marvelous games in a marvelous city.

  • So the Olympic Games in Riel have officially ended.

  • Okay, successfully by the sounds of things Sounds ok.

  • Yes, Yes.

  • OK.

  • So what words and phrases have you picked out from the new sites online?

  • Okay, so this week I found three phrases which are all over the news.

  • I'm the 1st 1 is kick off then we have passed the button on.

  • We have wrap up.

  • OK, so that's kickoff to begin or cause something to begin passed the baton.

  • So to give responsibility for something important to another person or group and wrap up to finish something, Okay, so how are these stories?

  • Heard these words appearing in the new stories where we have kickoff.

  • That's kick off with kickoff.

  • It covers this one from the New York Post closing ceremonies kick off in Rio and then we also have from Drum the drum Super Mario.

  • Japan's PM kicks off a Nintendo branded Olympics closing ceremony.

  • Okay, so I know kick.

  • But what's this got to do with kicking so kick off?

  • It's actually is a sporting idiom.

  • It comes from football on the word went, a football game begins with one player.

  • Kicking the board on that one kick is called the Kickoff.

  • It means beginning the much, but we use it in a broader context, not just sporting to just say something started.

  • OK, so like we kicked off this program by talking about the Fraser verb kickoff, we did indeed, Yes, yes.

  • You can use it for any contact at all and it's interesting because there are You can use it with or without an object.

  • So let's look at it without an object and that one.

  • Here we have the headline closing ceremonies kick off in Rio, so just meaning start exactly.

  • And then with an object.

  • We have groups.

  • Super Mario.

  • Japan's PM kicks off.

  • That's a room.

  • And then the object is the Nintendo branded Olympics closing ceremony.

  • So he causes to start certainly, that I also had kickoff, particularly British English.

  • And when people get angry, they start kicking off.

  • Yes, different use of the word it's it is accepted means to start something.

  • But in this case not start a match or a meeting, it means to start a fate of an argument.

  • So you're at a party and people are drinking a bit too much and somebody gets a bit load and argumentative.

  • You can say, Oh, no, I think he's going to kick off.

  • Things are kicking off.

  • Things are kicking off years.

  • Oh, it'll kicked off the whatever.

  • Yes, so to be to become angry and start a fight or an argument.

  • Unfortunately, that didn't happen in the Olympic ceremony.

  • They sound good nurse.

  • What about the next one?

  • We also have another sports related idiom here.

  • Don't me.

  • Yes, yes.

  • So in sky news we have really closing ceremony passes Olympic but on to Tokyo.

  • Eso in a real a game in the sports.

  • We have asked the stick, So I pass the baton on that.

  • You and I start running and win another gold medal in English.

  • But that doesn't mean that here, does it.

  • No, literally passing a stick.

  • You're not literally passing a stick, but what you are doing is your passing responsibility for something that you were responsible for.

  • And now you hand the responsibility over to someone else because it's their turn.

  • So it's all very kind of nice and agreed, and it's not a not a bad thing to happen.

  • It's exactly saying it's your turn to take this responsibility, so I'm going to give the responsibility to you, though in this case, Rio was responsible for the Olympics.

  • Now it's Japan's turn, so they have passed the Olympic, but on they've given the responsibility to Tokyo and Tokyo have taken the pattern.

  • You could say that yes, took the back of the neck of the bottle.

  • Yes.

  • Yeah, all of those work.

  • And if someone retires, they can pass the battle onto somebody else for their role or their job.

  • Yes.

  • When I retire, Sean, I will pass the battle.

  • That's a long time off their government.

  • On How about the final one?

  • Got appropriate one to finish off?

  • Yes.

  • So we have from this one.

  • The Sydney Morning Morning Herald Closing ceremony Rainy Rio wraps up challenging Olympic games on upbeat tropical Note that river ever is there.

  • Yeah, Rainy Rio wraps up.

  • Yes.

  • And interestingly, which you get a lot of in.

  • Headline rating Headline writers love to use what it's called alliteration where you use several words starting with the same letter eso or the same sound.

  • Yes, Rainy Rio wraps up and wrap up is a phrase over which means to finish, as we know, since I literally if you wrap something up, you cover it.

  • Like if you wrap up a present, you cover it in paper.

  • Yes, I guess.

  • Yeah, it does mean that you can rub something up covering it.

  • You can wrap up a baby in a in a blanket.

  • Yes, Often you wrap things up and then you put them away something you know, something you don't use, very as you might cover it and put it in a finished cupboard.

  • Yeah, we use it in an idiomatic sense to say, Finish to finish.

  • Something is to wrap up, wrap it up.

  • You can use it again, with or without an object.

  • So rainy riel wraps up the 11 games.

  • Or you can just say, Let's rub up, Let's wrap up or it's a wrap.

  • In the film and TV programs, it's often it's a wrap with Janice recording.

  • Yes, and then after you finish recording, you have a wrap party.

  • We have a wrap party today.

  • Yes, okay, well, now let's wrap up this conversation by listening to Tim Allman, who's reporting for the BBC.

  • Listen out for how he uses the phrase all verb to kick off.

  • Like the opening ceremony.

  • The closing ceremony had plenty of fireworks on lots of vibrant color.

  • As Carmen Miranda played, the athletes arrived this time instead of separately, nation by nation that came in as one.

  • What was described as this spirit of togetherness, the Olympic spirit, then the symbolic handing over of the Olympic flag.

  • Japan the host four years from now, getting the chance to hint at what might be coming in 2020.

  • The country's prime minister, Shinzo Arbet, Kicking things off dressed, is one of the Super Mario brothers.

  • Okay, so that was Tim Allman.

  • And he said that Japan's prime minister kicked off the ceremony as a super Mario brother and just a hint of what's going to come in four years time.

  • Okay, so we sent you a Facebook challenge and we asked, We set another football idiom.

  • So he said, If you blow the whistle on someone, what do you do?

  • Do you a report in illegal activity?

  • Be stopped talking to someone or c finish a meeting?

  • What kind of response that we get, Catherine, As usual, we had a very good response on Facebook.

  • Lots and lots of answers.

  • A few people didn't get it right, but almost everybody said a report and an illegal activity so well done.

  • Everybody, including Vera Dire it Marta Gomez on Mohammed Haidar, who will got it right and also special mention, too.

  • And it's I who said it's the same as whistle blowing and whistle blower is a person who reports a legal and an illegal activity.

  • So well done, everyone.

  • Well done.

  • Okay.

  • So to wrap things up, can you give us a recap off the words we've heard today, Katherine, I can.

  • We had kickoff, which means begin or cause something to begin past the bottom, which means give responsibility for something important to another person or group on wrap up, which means to finish something.

  • Okay, thank you very much and go to our website BBC learning english dot com For more information about this story and to practice those words, I think it's a wrap.

  • So goodbye.

  • Goodbye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

He's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we give you the words and phrases to help you talk about the news.

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B1 wrap ceremony olympic kick closing responsibility

BBC News Review: Olympics closing ceremony

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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