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  • 16 from BBC learning english dot com.

  • Hello again.

  • Welcome to Six minute Grammar with Me, Finn and May Anna.

  • Hello.

  • In today's program, we're looking at two ways to talk about the future.

  • Let's start with some sample sentences.

  • Rub.

  • Hello up.

  • Hello.

  • Can we have an example of a future arrangement, please?

  • Sure.

  • Farid is meeting his cousin at the airport on Saturday.

  • Thanks.

  • Rob.

  • The sentence Farid is meeting his cousin at the airport on Saturday describes an arrangement made between two people to do a particular activity at a particular time.

  • Yes, and we can use present continuous.

  • That subject plus, um, is or are plus verb i n g.

  • To talk about this type of future arrangement.

  • Now let's look at going to we use going to with an infinitive verb to talk about future plans.

  • Things we intend to do now an example.

  • Please, Rob, when I finish university, I'm going to spend a year traveling.

  • I'm going to spend a year traveling.

  • That sounds like an exciting plan.

  • And another please, Simon an ibra him are going to spend the whole weekend playing football.

  • Eso Simon and Ibrahim have some interesting plans to But do they seem very similar to arrangements?

  • Would you say Emma?

  • Well, yes, they dio.

  • We can often use either the present continuous or going to for future plans.

  • So we could say I'm meeting some friends for a drink tonight.

  • Or you could say, I'm going to meet some friends for a drink tonight But sometimes we can only use going to.

  • Here's an example.

  • It's really cold.

  • I think it's going to snow.

  • It's going to snow now.

  • That isn't a plan on.

  • It isn't an arrangement, but the speaker can say what's going to happen based on the present situation.

  • Whatever is happening now on to do this, it's subject.

  • Plus Sam is or are plus going to plus on infinitive verb without too BBC learning english dot com.

  • And we're looking at present, continuous for future arrangements on going to plus a verb to talk about future plans and arrangements and things we know are going to happen based on the present situation.

  • That's right.

  • So, fin, are you doing anything interesting tonight?

  • Well, I'm taking my girlfriend to the theater, and the play is starting at seven o'clock.

  • Very good.

  • What are you going to see, huh?

  • Oh, Emma, I do believe you're asking the questions about my future arrangements.

  • Andi plans?

  • You asked me a yes.

  • No present, continuous question.

  • I eating anything interesting tonight on.

  • Did you asked me a question Word going to question.

  • What are you going to see?

  • You're quite right, Fin Andi.

  • I used a special short form of going to that.

  • We usually only find in informal spoken English.

  • I said gonna gonna It's very common in spoken English.

  • What you're gonna see?

  • That's right.

  • The long form is what are you going to see on the informal?

  • Short form is what you're going to see.

  • What are you gonna see?

  • Well, I'll tell you later, but first it's time for a quiz.

  • So question one.

  • Imagine your at a football match.

  • Your team is playing really well.

  • Do you say a?

  • I'm sure they're going to score a goal.

  • Or do you say be?

  • I'm sure they are scoring a goal, and the answer is a I'm sure they're going to score a goal.

  • That's right.

  • Based on the present situation, which is there playing well, we can talk about a probable future situation with going to.

  • I'm sure they're going to score a goal.

  • Right question to which is correct?

  • A.

  • We're gonna going by train.

  • Be We're going.

  • Go by.

  • Train or C, We're gonna go by train.

  • It's see.

  • We're gonna go by train.

  • It's a shorter spoken form off.

  • We're going to go by train.

  • Very good.

  • Now number three, which is the correct future Sentence A.

  • Hurry up.

  • The train is leaving.

  • Or be Hurry up.

  • The train is going to leave in 10 minutes.

  • Onda, the correct answer is B.

  • The train is going to leave in 10 minutes.

  • Sentence A needs A time expression to give it future Meaning?

  • Yes, indeed.

  • Well, I'm going to leave in a minute because I'm going to see a Shakespeare play with my girlfriend.

  • Eso I'll see you next time, Emma.

16 from BBC learning english dot com.

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A2 present continuous present train continuous arrangement emma

Present continuous and going to - 6 Minute Grammar

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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