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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English I'm Dan and joining me today is Katherine.

  • Hi, Catherine.

  • Hello, Dan.

  • Hello, everyone.

  • So what's our story?

  • Today's story is about the end of an iconic piece of software.

  • Ooh, that sounds interesting.

  • Okay, lets him more from this BBC World Service News report.

  • The tech giant Apple has announced that its music download service, iTunes, is to be shut down.

  • The firm announced the launch of a range of replacement APS at its annual developer conference in San Jose.

  • ITunes quickly became a hugely popular alternative to other music online services when it was launched in 2000 and three, but has lost subscribers in recent years as listeners increasingly turned to streaming services.

  • So iTunes is going to shut down.

  • A couple announced this at its conference in San Jose.

  • Now, instead of iTunes, people will have access to three new separate ups.

  • That's Apple music up a podcast on Apple TV so the right tunes will move over to these ups on.

  • But It's basically because off music streaming services that people aren't really doing the download thing anymore.

  • So it's the end of iTunes.

  • Ah, shames The end of an era early two thousands.

  • Okay, so we've got words.

  • Three words and expressions that people can use to talk about this story.

  • What if we go for them?

  • Catherine, we have dissolves.

  • Phase out.

  • Andi bloated.

  • Okay, Can we have your first headline, then with dissolves, please?

  • We can We're going to the BBC news website.

  • First on the headline is coupled dissolves iTunes into new ups, dissolves breaks down and changes.

  • Now, I thought this was about sugar in coffee or something.

  • Yes.

  • You put your sugar in your coffee.

  • It just you'd stir the coffee that sugar disappears.

  • It's deserve yes, it's still eso.

  • Yeah, that's the meaning of deserve is to make something break up.

  • Andi, mingle with something else so that it becomes a part of it solid in a liquid collagen and quit.

  • So surely they're not dropping iTunes into liquid?

  • Yes, that's exactly what they dio.

  • Good fiction Makes a headline.

  • Not so.

  • The idea of iTunes is now going to be sort of broken up on placed into these three new ups, so iTunes users aren't going to lose their music.

  • Presumably, they're going to still access it.

  • But iTunes won't exist as I tunes anymore.

  • It will be broken up and placed within these other ups, so that's an idiomatic use of the word dissolve.

  • It will be dissolved into three.

  • New program dissolved into is a proposition that you use with this This idea.

  • Nice now.

  • I also thought that you could use dissolved with official things like marriages and contracts is absolutely yes.

  • If you formally or legally end a partnership in particular, like a marriage by divorce business arrangement, a partnership, you dissolve that partnership, and it's a legal term.

  • That means when you officially and something that the agreement or the partnership is dissolved.

  • Thank you very much, right?

  • Let's dissolve into the next headline then.

  • So now we'll get spin dot com, a very short headline.

  • Apple will phase out I June's phase out end something slowly or in stages.

  • Now that's a phrase of Web.

  • It is phase out.

  • So let's look at the first part of the Boesel verb phase spelt at P.

  • H.

  • A s a phase is a period of time or a stage or a step in a process or port.

  • So, like three stages in the triathlon phases, running phase, swimming phase and cycling for yes, illustrate phases in that process make the whole Yes.

  • So if afraid phase is a stage, if you phase something out, it means you end it stage by stage, step by step.

  • Not all at the same time.

  • It takes a bit of time to end something.

  • Okay, Like a process or a project or a service.

  • Electric cars.

  • Yes.

  • Yes, yes.

  • Yeah.

  • Well, you would phase out.

  • Let's a government of Country X wants everybody to stop using petrol and diesel cars.

  • Okay, now it could say that's it.

  • No more from today.

  • But it would be how would I get to work?

  • Exactly.

  • It'll be chaos.

  • So probably they would start doing it step by step.

  • Maybe No, no petrol cause in this particular area than a few months later that extend the area, then maybe limit the days.

  • So step by step, and often you number these phases.

  • Phase one, phase two face tree.

  • They would phase out these petrol cars, petrol cars and they would phase in, Ah, the electric cars.

  • And that's the opposite.

  • That is, if you phase out and you end something slowly or in stages and face something in, then you introduce it slowly or in state.

  • Precisely.

  • Very nice on.

  • Is this only to do with sorry, the context of electric cars come about businesses and services?

  • Yeah, I think any any sort of big change that you introduced.

  • Gradually, you often phase it in or you facings out.

  • You face things in.

  • But we do use it, Maurin.

  • The kind of wider context.

  • Not so much in a personal sense.

  • You wouldn't say I'm going to phase in a vegetarianism.

  • Yeah, yes, I mean, you could, but it's more to do with sort of business and public changes.

  • All right, let's phase into our third headline.

  • But before we do, are you enjoying the program?

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  • Isn't that right?

  • Katherine hit up about people, you know?

  • It makes sense, right?

  • Let's take a look at our third and final headline, then, please.

  • Okay, We're looking at the Telegraph now.

  • Farewell, iTunes.

  • Why?

  • Few will mourn the death of apples.

  • Bloated music program Bloated, too large or inefficient?

  • Bloated.

  • Floated Biello 80 D Yes, Don.

  • I believe you're a pizza lover.

  • I'm a massive Beatles.

  • A huge on.

  • You know, the last time you went to a restaurant, we ate a big pizza, and then you just couldn't resist a lot in the 2nd 1 And other big pizza.

  • Yes.

  • So tell us, have you felt after that relaxed, satisfied?

  • Happy?

  • Well, I was certainly very happy, but also I was quite full of pizza and pizza.

  • Lots of air in its food and air.

  • And I've been drinking, you know, Coca Cola.

  • So I'm really big now.

  • I feel like I'm pregnant.

  • What would like the poke?

  • Yes.

  • No, you do.

  • I'd probably explode.

  • You don't Don't know.

  • So your feather, that feeling of being really full stretched, stomach uncomfortable, unable to move you're bloated is a feeling of being bloated on the ideas.

  • Lots of physical one.

  • In terms of this description of apples of iTunes being bloated, it means that the software, according to this opinion, wasn't working very well because it was too big.

  • It wasn't working as well as it could be.

  • There's too much on it.

  • So bloated means more so big that it's not useful anymore.

  • Okay, so it's not using the computer's resources effectively.

  • No.

  • Yeah, on those, like takes up all year spaces.

  • Where?

  • So it was too big for its own youth.

  • Okay, and is it just programs that could be bloated and people?

  • Or you can have systems.

  • Companies can be bloated.

  • You often say that a big company which has maybe too many stuff in a particular area or it's got too much stock or it does two things in an old fashioned way.

  • So it's working really hard, but it's not being productive.

  • I see.

  • How can we remove the bloat from You have to slim down or stream lanes?

  • Dream lines, Dream line.

  • It means get rid of that bloat, make something thinner by getting rid of stuff that isn't working.

  • Okay and stuff, unfortunately, or premises or equipment or stock or things that they produce.

  • So just making everything smaller, more efficient, working better, yes, dreamlike thank you very much for that, Catherine.

  • Now, could we recap the vocabulary, please?

  • We can.

  • We had dissolves, breaks down and changes phase out and something slowly or in stages.

  • Andi.

  • Bloated, too large or inefficient.

  • Thank you very much.

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  • What more do you want and not a sign of bloat in sight?

  • Thank you very much for joining us.

  • And good bye.

  • Good bye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

  • Hi, everyone.

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he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English I'm Dan and joining me today is Katherine.

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B1 phase bloated headline dissolved petrol ups

Apple announces the death of iTunes - News Review

  • 5 1
    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
Video vocabulary