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  • Review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English I'm Dan and joining me this morning is Katherine.

  • Hi, Catherine.

  • Hello, Dan.

  • So what's the story?

  • Today's story Everybody is about a protest.

  • Okay, let's hear more about that from this BBC World Service News report Beijing has condemned the ransacking of the Hong Kong parliament by pro democracy protesters.

  • The Hong Kong and Macao Affairs Office said it backed the territory's authorities to investigate what it called the criminal responsibility of violent offenders.

  • It said the demonstrators actions on Monday had trampled the rule of law.

  • So we're in Hong Kong for this story and we've just had the 22nd anniversary of the Hong Kong handover to China now.

  • Protesters in Hong Kong broke into the parliament building and they caused significant damage.

  • This action has been condemned by the Chinese government and also Hong Kong's leader Curry Lamb.

  • They say that the actions taken by the protesters were illegal and they showed no respect for the rule of law.

  • I see okay, so we've got three words and expressions that our viewers can use to talk about this story.

  • What have we got for Catherine?

  • Yes, We've got three really good words today.

  • We have deface blatant Andi zero tolerance deface blatant and zero tolerance.

  • Okay, let's have our first headline.

  • Okay, so we're looking at BBC news.

  • First Hong Kong protesters storm on deface parliament on handover anniversary deface ruined something's appearance by damaging or writing on it.

  • Now this looks like a word building word.

  • It is a word building.

  • Would we have two parts to this word?

  • Second part is face that is your face.

  • The thing that you look at the world with on the idea of face is about appearance.

  • Now this wood is preceded by the prefix d d e.

  • So the prefix days often has a negative meaning, and in this case, it means spoil or ruin somebody's or something's appearance.

  • So if you deface something, you do something to spoil its appearance.

  • So it's a verb that relates to kind of vandalism, isn't is often used, almost always used to do with vandalism.

  • It's a deliberate act of making something look bad by painting on it by damaging it by using graffiti by ripping it down.

  • It's some kind of visual damage to something.

  • Okay, so the protesters defaced Parliament.

  • That's a building.

  • Yes.

  • What other things do you do face?

  • Well, defaces after news for things which are in the public arena.

  • So we've got signs, notices, statues, public buildings, trains, public transport, things like that.

  • Anything that's public, the visible and publicly available, you damage its appearance.

  • You deface it.

  • Okay, so we could say the protesters defaced the building with graffiti.

  • Yes, you can defaced with graffiti with paint, or you can do by damaging it by hitting it so within, by all propositions also, you can use the proposition by to say who did the defacing.

  • Okay, so the public building was defaced by burglars.

  • You may notice that I have a rather flashy shirt on today, as usual.

  • Yes, always well turned.

  • And I just wondered, what if I was sitting next to rob and in an active, malevolent jealousy?

  • Because my shirt is so nice, he takes a pen and defaces my shirt.

  • Can I say you've defaced my shirt?

  • Probably a police officer might charge him with defacing, but no you wouldn't say that.

  • You'd say you've spoiled it.

  • You ruined it.

  • Okay, What have you done to brush it?

  • But you probably wouldn't use Defaced.

  • Your shirt is not public property.

  • Okay, you might think it should be.

  • But as yet it's still just yours.

  • OK?

  • It's not that good that good.

  • So do we have any synonyms to finish on?

  • We do as well as we just said.

  • Ruin, You can also say spoil disfigure vandalized this figure Now that looks like another word.

  • Building work.

  • It's absolutely another prefixed with another word after it.

  • This is again has a negative meaning figure it means shape or form.

  • So it's quite similar to deface.

  • You can deface something.

  • You can disfigure something and it means spoil its physical appearance.

  • Thank you very much for explaining that and we'll move on to the next headline on the Telegraph Hong Kong protests Beijing says storming of Parliament is blatant challenge to system of government blatant Done openly in an easy to see way.

  • What kind of wood is this?

  • Blatant is an objective.

  • It's spelt b l 80 a nt blatant okay.

  • And ah, what kind of words would be use it with its Imagine Well, and the meaning of blatant is something's obvious.

  • If you do something in a blatant way, you you obvious you're brave, your bold you don't care who sees it.

  • In fact, you warned people to see it quite often on.

  • It's about not caring what other people think.

  • OK, so not everybody would like what you're going to do.

  • So in that sense, it often has a negative meeting.

  • You do something negatively, but it's a negative action.

  • But you do it and you don't care.

  • Let's see it so you can have a blatant lie.

  • You can have, in this case of Bladen, protest a blatant challenge.

  • Blatant disregard.

  • If you don't care about something that the effect of something, you can have a blatant disregard for the results of your actions when a child is Northey.

  • When I was naughty when I was younger, my mother said.

  • That's a blatant lack of respect.

  • Young man, go to your room.

  • I'm sure you were terrible, Thank you very much.

  • So is it always bad?

  • It's usually, but but you can have, you know, you can have a blatant attraction for somebody you can have you can do blatant flirting.

  • You know you conducing things, obviously is not always, but but there's always a sense of your being bold.

  • You're being brave and you don't care who sees it.

  • All right, well, thank you for that blatant and easy to understand explanation.

  • Let's go to our next headline.

  • But before we do Ha, Did you know that we also have another news program that teaches you fantastic vocabulary?

  • It's called lingo hack.

  • It comes out every Wednesday, and we have a playlist for you that you can access by clicking on the link below.

  • Isn't that right, Catherine?

  • That is right down.

  • So click on the link for real news and really vocabulary with lingo Hack.

  • Okay, let's go to our third and final headline, please.

  • Okay, we're looking at the New Straits Times.

  • Chinese newspaper calls for zero tolerance over HK protests Zero tolerance enforcing a rule with absolutely no exceptions.

  • Okay, what's this all about?

  • That so we have is unknown here on it means basically if there's a rule you have to obey it on did you won't be allowed to not obey it.

  • Tolerance means acceptance.

  • If you tolerate something you accept it without complaining or protesting.

  • But if you have zero tolerance, you don't accept, you don't and you do complain.

  • If somebody does this particular thing, so it doesn't matter if you break the rule in a really big way or a really tiny way, it's still it's still broken and you'll still be punished.

  • Absolutely.

  • So you might say that the local council or your country has a zero policy for zero tolerance policy towards littering.

  • Littering?

  • That's right, I was gonna say Snap.

  • Yes, schools can have a zero tolerance policy to drug taking.

  • Yes, and it means you do it just want, and you will be severely or rigorously punished.

  • So there is a There is a consequence for doing that.

  • You don't do it.

  • It's not allowed Ondas often used in kind of big public senses, like lettering or drugs.

  • But it can also be used in a very personal way.

  • Yeah, like my family dinners on Sundays when we all sit down as a family together, there is a zero tolerance policy towards mobile phones at the dinner table.

  • No phones that have it know what I haven't done.

  • Too distracting is supposed to sit down and talk to your family.

  • I think that's a very good policy.

  • I quite like it too.

  • Now could we recap the vocabulary, please?

  • We can't We had deface ruined something's appearance by damaging or writing on it latent, done openly in an easy to see way on zero tolerance, enforcing a rule with absolutely no exceptions.

  • Thank you very much.

  • Now, if you'd like to test yourself on ST zero calorie, there is a quiz that you can take.

  • That's on our website.

  • BBC Learning english dot com were also all over social media, so you can find it on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter on Instagram.

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  • Thank you very much for joining us and good bye, good bye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

  • Well, wasn't that a great video?

  • But that's not the only one we've got on our YouTube channel.

Review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English I'm Dan and joining me this morning is Katherine.

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B1 tolerance hong kong appearance parliament rule

Hong Kong protestors 'trampled the rule of law' - News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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