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  • Hello, and welcome to today's Grammar Gameshow!

  • I'm your host, Will!

  • but,

  • I don't offer to help!

  • And of course, let's not forget Leslie,

  • our all-knowing voice in the sky.

  • Hello everyone!

  • Tonight we're going to be asking

  • three questions about

  • Some and any!

  • Those two confusing words that

  • belong to a group called quantifiers.

  • OK! Now, let's meet our contestants!

  • Hi, everyone. I'm Nick!

  • And contestant number two.

  • Hello, everyone. I'm Helen!

  • Welcome back Helen!

  • Ok, let's get going and don't forget

  • you can play along at home too.

  • Our first round is a quick-fire round.

  • Listen to these sentences,

  • and tell me if the missing word is 'some'

  • or 'any'.

  • I need to buymilk.

  • Some!

  • Correct!

  • Did you havetrouble?

  • Any!

  • Correct!

  • There isn't … time.

  • Any!

  • Correct!

  • I wantpeace and quiet.

  • Some!

  • Correct!

  • Would you likecoffee?

  • Any!

  • Wrong!

  • Oh dear, Nick.

  • That last one should have been 'some'.

  • If you can tell me why,

  • I'll give you a point.

  • It should be 'any'. It's a question.

  • We use 'any' in a question

  • Well observed, but not right I'm afraid.

  • Helen, would you like to have a go?

  • Something about requests, right?

  • Can you give me any more?

  • Of course!

  • Will £50 do?

  • Nicely!

  • Leslie?

  • Well done, Helen!

  • We usually use 'some' in affirmative sentences,

  • and 'any' in questions and negatives.

  • However,

  • if the question is a request,

  • or an offer to help,

  • we also use 'some'.

  • Well done Helen!

  • I'll expect the money in my account

  • later today.

  • 30 points for you!

  • Ok - on to our second round.

  • In question one,

  • we established that 'some' was used in

  • affirmative sentences,

  • and 'any' in questions and negatives.

  • Look at these three affirmative sentences

  • and tell me why we can use 'any'.

  • a) There's hardly any food left.

  • b) He never has any money.

  • c) They split up without any argument.

  • It's because

  • I don't know. I'm so stupid!

  • Come on, Nick.

  • Don't be so...

  • negative.

  • What?

  • I said

  • don't be so

  • Will: negative! Nick: Negative, yes!

  • The structure of the sentence is positive,

  • but the meanings are negative because of the words.

  • Leslie?

  • Very good Nick.

  • As you said,

  • the structures of the sentences are affirmative,

  • but they all contain words that have a negative

  • or limiting meaning.

  • In this case: hardly, never and without.

  • This makes the sentences negative,

  • so we can use 'any'.

  • Ten points for you. See?

  • Try to have a little more confidence in yourself, eh?

  • I mean, it's no fun undermining you

  • if you're already feeling useless.

  • On to our third, and final question.

  • Why is it necessary to use 'some of' and 'any of'

  • in these two sentences?

  • I didn't know any of the people there.

  • I think some of your friends are here.

  • This one's easy!

  • It's because they contain the words 'here' and 'there'.

  • Nope!

  • Totally wrong.

  • Wow, you really messed that one up.

  • Helen?

  • Wellmaybe it's because

  • 'some' and 'any' have another word after them

  • before the noun?

  • Now, you're cooking Helen!

  • Leslie?

  • Well done again.

  • When 'some' or 'any' are followed by a determiner,

  • such as an article or possessive,

  • we use 'some of' or 'any of'.

  • Good thinking Helen!

  • Six and a half points for you.

  • And that brings us to the end of today's

  • Grammar Gameshow.

  • Let's count out the points.

  • And the winner is

  • Nick!

  • Well done Nick!

  • Just kidding!

  • Helen won!

  • Well done Helen!

  • Here's what you've won!

  • It's a flip-flop!

  • Well, Nick,

  • it looks like this is the end.

  • Try to have a little more confidence, eh?

  • Do you have anything to say?

  • Please don't drop me in the pit!

  • I have a wife and two kids!

  • I'll think about it

  • No deal.

  • Set loose the crickets!

  • It looks like we'll need another contestant.

  • Thanks for joining us.

  • Say goodbye, Leslie.

  • Goodbye Leslie

  • See you next time.

Hello, and welcome to today's Grammar Gameshow!

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A2 helen nick leslie affirmative negative correct

Some and Any: The Grammar Gameshow Episode 8

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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