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  • he's review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review.

  • The program.

  • We show You how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English I'm Dan, and joining me today is Katherine.

  • Hi, Katherine.

  • Hi, Dan.

  • So what's the story?

  • We've got a story today about a controversial new advertising campaign.

  • Okay, let's hear more from this.

  • BBC World Service News Bulletin The sports giant Nike has said its latest advertising campaign will feature Colin Kaepernick, the former American football player who led a protest against police brutality towards African Americans.

  • Kaepernick was a quarterback with the San Francisco 40 Niners for six years but stirred a controversy in 2016 when he now don't during the playing of the U.

  • S national anthem before matches.

  • So Colin Kaepernick was an NFL American football player during the American national anthem.

  • Americans usually stand up as a mark of respect and patriotism.

  • Colin Kaepernick didn't stand.

  • He decided to kneel during the national anthem.

  • He did this'll, he says, as a protest against police brutality.

  • Violence against African Americans from the police Now opinion at the time was very divided.

  • Some people thought this was a great thing to do.

  • Other people were very angry and thought it was a very unpatriotic.

  • The brand sports brown Nike have now decided Teoh that Colin Kaepernick will be the face of their new advertising campaign.

  • This decision has proved very, very controversial in America.

  • Thank you very much.

  • We'll we've got three words and expressions that they can use to talk about this story.

  • What have we got for them?

  • We have provocative exiled on litmus test, provocative, exiled and litmus test.

  • OK, Katherine, can we have our first headline, please?

  • Yet we're going to Fox.

  • Ktv you Colin Kaepernick appears in provocative Nike.

  • Odd, provocative, causing a reaction or thought provocative.

  • It's a nice word.

  • What kind of word is it?

  • It's an objective down and it comes from the verb to provoke.

  • And something tells me you've got a story about provoking visit.

  • The cheeky smile I had on my face always.

  • Well, yeah.

  • I used to provoke my brother all the time.

  • Daisy, A little brother three years younger than me.

  • What did you dio poke him?

  • Yeah, I put my hand in front of me.

  • I'm not touching that.

  • Nothing you could do and wind him up.

  • What did you say?

  • She said, don't provoke your brother.

  • What did your brother do when you provoked him?

  • He either got upsets and cried.

  • Or he got angry and he hit me.

  • Accident.

  • So, poor brother.

  • I'm sure you're very sorry now, but you provoked a response, which was anger and annoyance on being upset on.

  • This is the key to provoke the reaction that you get can be about annoyance or anger.

  • It can also be desire.

  • You can talk about something provoking desire, often sexual desire.

  • We talk about people wearing provocative clothing.

  • We can also things can also be thought provoking something often that you read or hear or see that's designed often to make you think like a good thought provoking documentary, for example.

  • Absolutely yes.

  • Okay, so I'm guessing that the use of provocative in this headline isn't anything to do with sexual desire?

  • Probably not.

  • It's more to do with given the history off Colin Kaepernick.

  • It's likely to be provocative in this sense, off anger and science and thought as well.

  • It's going to make people respond either angry or thinking about the situation.

  • Thank you very much for that thought provoking explanation.

  • Let's move on to our second headline, then.

  • OK, we've got Fox Sports now.

  • Exiled NFL star Colin Kaepernick reveals ultimate sacrifice and politically charged Nike campaign exiled, forced out of a place or group.

  • Sounds like a very serious would.

  • It is, and it comes on the verb to exile.

  • We often use it in the passive.

  • Somebody has bean exiled.

  • It's often used in a political sense when a politician has to, or leader has to leave their country because often it's not safe for them to stay so that sometimes they get sent to live.

  • Sometimes they choose to live in a different country.

  • Could be like a crime couldn't like it could be the punishment for a crime.

  • It could be a punishment for a crime.

  • So for various reasons, politicians and leaders sometimes have to live outside their own country.

  • They live in exile, they all exiled.

  • They are on exile.

  • Okay, in this case, though, Colin Kaepernick hasn't been forced to leave the USA.

  • So why are we using exile here?

  • So it's not in a geographical sense that he's been exiled, but he hasn't played in the NFL since 2017.

  • So because off his his controversial accent actions, he is now unable to participate in his sports.

  • So in that sense, he's in exile.

  • He has Bean exiled from his profession.

  • Okay, so I mean, in this case, he's not allowed to be within that group.

  • So could I say that I've been exiled from the tennis club?

  • You probably just get kicked out of your tennis level.

  • Asked to leave, we use exile in that kind of is quite a big word used for kind of politicians, famous people for controversial figures.

  • So it's not.

  • You don't use it for day today.

  • Situations Okay, so in this case, it's being used because it's a newspaper and it's a kind of Yeah, seriously, Yeah.

  • Nations.

  • Yes.

  • Okay, let's have a look at our third headline then, please on.

  • We're now going to NBC Sports Colin Kaepernick Art.

  • A litmus test off Nikes.

  • True Intentions, litmus test action that shows someone's riel thoughts or opinions.

  • I thought litmus tests were all about chemistry.

  • Yeah, I remember in my school chemistry lessons, they gave us 22 bottles of liquid in a piece of paper and you put the piece of paper at one end into one bottle, and it went red.

  • And then he turned it over and put it on the other end into another bottle, and it went blue on.

  • The bottles look the same, but you got a different response, whether the liquid was acid or alkaline.

  • So the paper showed what was going on even though you couldn't tell normally.

  • So it's a kind of test of the situation.

  • Okay, so this is revealing kind of the inner workings of the inner thoughts.

  • Yeah, off something or a group of people shows what's going shows what a litmus test shows what's really going on.

  • It's an attempt to find out what's likely to happen in a particular situation.

  • Oh, like home the other day, I I pitch tonight.

  • Why?

  • I have an idea for a new show.

  • I'm gonna say what it is right now.

  • Keep it under wraps.

  • You know how sharks?

  • But I wanted to see if it was a good idea or not.

  • So I took Robin neither side, and I said, Listen, guys, this is the idea, did it and they gave me some feedback.

  • And so, based on that I would decide whether or not to tell the rest of the team, the larger groups.

  • Is that a litmus test?

  • Kind of, Yeah, yeah, it's when you are, you sort of test your idea to find out whether it's going to be successful in the wider sense.

  • Companies often do this when they launch a product.

  • They might only launch a product in one city, see how popular it is and then decide whether to launch it in a in A in a wider area.

  • So a litmus test is a test off what's really going on or what people think, or what the likely responses to something, Thank you very much.

  • Okay, So before we recap our vocabulary, let's go to our Social media Challenge.

  • This morning we posted a synonym of controversial is a contentious be agreeable or C unbiased?

  • Catherine, what's the right answer and how do they do?

  • The right answer is answer.

  • A contentious is a synonym for controversial lots of correct answers.

  • On Instagram, we had Seattle Facebook, Palm men can and on Twitter, Arun Bharadwaj well done to everybody who got it right and well done to those three in particular Okay.

  • Can we please recap the vocabulary?

  • Certainly we had provocative causing a reaction or thought exiled, forced out of a place or group litmus test action that shows someone's real thoughts or opinions.

  • Thank you very much.

  • Now, if you'd like to test yourself on today's vocabulary, there is a quiz that you can take on our website BBC Learning english dot com.

  • We've got stacks of videos and other wonderful material to improve and of course, we have a brand spanking new app.

  • Yeah, you confined news review on it.

  • It will be there later today on the quiz will also be on the app, so make sure you download it for Android and Apple systems.

  • You can find all the details on our website.

  • Thank you very much for joining us and good bye bye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

he's review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review.

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Nike-Kaepernick advert controversy: BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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