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  • Neil: Hello and welcome to 6 Minute English,

  • I'm Neil.

  • Rob: And I'm Rob.

  • Neil: And in this programme we're

  • discussing food.

  • Rob: Food glorious food! There's only one

  • thing better than talking about food and

  • that's eating it.

  • Neil: Well I know you are a bit of a

  • gastronomesomeone who enjoys and

  • knows a lot about high-quality foodbut

  • today we're talking about photographing

  • food, not eating it.

  • Rob: That is a shame because I am on a

  • see-food dietif I see food, I have to eat

  • it. Get it?!

  • Neil: Yes Rob, very very funny. But in the

  • social media-addicted world, just seeing

  • food - not eating it - is big business as I will

  • explain shortly. But shall we feast on a

  • question first, Rob?

  • Rob: Yes, if it tastes good!

  • Neil: It does. So, do you know the name

  • for the person who's usually second in

  • charge in a restaurant kitchen after the

  • head chef and has lots of responsibility

  • for running it? Is it the

  • a) Pastry chef, b) Commis chef, or

  • c) Sous chef.

  • Rob: Hmm, I'm not a chef expert but I'll

  • say c) a Sous chefit sounds important!

  • Neil: Well I'll give the answer later in the

  • programme. Now let me explain more

  • about food and photos. These days, how

  • well a dishthat's a noun for food

  • prepared for eatingis photographed

  • can matter more than how it actually

  • tastes.

  • Rob: And I suppose social media

  • platforms are the best way for sharing

  • food photos on, aren't they? And I have

  • been guilty of taking a picture

  • of my food on my smartphonebut only

  • when eating some amazing food at a

  • posh restaurant.

  • Neil: Which isn't very often I suppose! But

  • by sharing images across social media,

  • people see them and think the food looks

  • delicious, I must go to that restaurant and eat it!

  • Rob: You could argue it's about style over

  • substance, meaning the look of something

  • is better that the content or product.

  • Neil: Maybe, Robalthough I'm sure

  • sometimes the food tastes just as good

  • as it looks. Anyway, the BBC Radio 4

  • programme, You and Yours, has been

  • looking into this. They spoke to several

  • influential Instagrammers and bloggers

  • influential means having the power to

  • make people change what they think.

  • Here's one of themRebecca Milford,

  • who edits a website called Bar Chick.

  • What does she think about this new trend?

  • It sounds very cliche that a picture speaks

  • a thousand words but it really does and

  • I've got friends now that instead of doing

  • what you used to do and going on to the

  • website of a restaurant to see what they

  • were serving, then you'd go onto their

  • Instagram account and check out their

  • images, and choose what you want to eat

  • literally based on what you're seeing.

  • So it has to be presentable, I suppose.

  • Neil: Rebecca used a well-known and

  • well-used phrase thereone that is used

  • so much it has become boring

  • what we call a cliche. The phrase is a

  • picture speaks a thousand words.

  • Rob: Yesand even if it is a clicheit

  • is so true. You describe a fantastic meal

  • in a long blog but you can quickly see

  • how it looks from a picture and then

  • create an idea in your mind of how it

  • tastes. So when you're promoting food, a

  • photo is everything.

  • Neil: And that's why some restaurants pay PR

  • companies lots of money to take stylish

  • photos that can be shared on social media.

  • It's like a fashion photoshoot for food.

  • Rob: Yes and Rebecca said the food has

  • to be presentablethat's looking good

  • enough for people to seebecause

  • people are making choices on what they

  • see. I've also heard that some chefs and

  • restaurateurs have adjusted their

  • menus to produce meals that look good

  • on a smartphone camera. A restaurateur,

  • by the way, is the name of a person who

  • owns and manages a restaurant.

  • Neil: Now, while there is a risk that good-looking

  • food on social media accounts such as

  • Instagram, might not match how it tastes,

  • there is a theory your brain might trick you

  • in to thinking it does tastes good.

  • The You and Yours programme

  • also heard from Professor Charles Spence,

  • an Experimental Psychologist from

  • Oxford University, about how this happens

  • We see the food first, or the drink in the

  • glass, and our brain's already imagining

  • what it's going to taste like. And the more

  • beautifully it's presented, the more

  • artistically, that sets better expectations

  • and they kind of carry over and anchor the

  • tasting experience.

  • Neil: Right, so a great photo of food can

  • possibly make us think it tastes better

  • too. We create an idea in our head of how

  • it will taste which influences our expectations

  • when we actually eat the food.

  • Rob: And expectation means the feeling

  • that something good is going to happen.

  • Neil: Right Rob, I'm sure you're expecting

  • the answer to the question I set you

  • earlier. I asked, if you knew the name for

  • the person who's usually second in

  • charge in a restaurant kitchen after the

  • Head chef and has lots of responsibility

  • for running it? Is it the

  • a) Pastry chef, b) Commis chef, or c) Sous chef.

  • What did you say, Rob?

  • Rob: I said c) a Sous chef. Am I right?

  • Neil: You are Rob! Give that man a job,

  • here maybe in the BBC canteen!

  • Rob: Come on, Neil. I think I could do

  • better than that! But before I do let's

  • remind ourselves of some of the vocabulary

  • we've discussed today. Starting with

  • gastronomethat's someone who enjoys

  • and knows a lot about high-quality

  • foodsomeone like me!

  • Neil: Maybe Rob. We also discussed the

  • word influential, meaning having the

  • power to make people change what they think.

  • Rob: We also mentioned cliche – a

  • well-known phrase that is so overused it

  • has become boring. Like for example 'a

  • picture speaks a thousand words.' You

  • never use cliches do you, Neil?

  • Neil: Absolutely never. Let's move on to

  • presentablethat describes something

  • that looks good, is smart and is good

  • enough for people to see. A bit like me in

  • my smart new jumper. Do you like it?

  • Rob: Very nice! Well a presenter has to be

  • presentable, Neil! Our next word was

  • expectation, a word that describes the

  • feeling that something good is going to

  • happen. I have an expectation that people

  • will love this programme!

  • Neil: Well, let's hope so!

  • Rob: Yes, and that brings us to the end of

  • this programme. Don't forget to check out

  • our social media platforms. See you soon, bye.

  • Neil: Bye!

Neil: Hello and welcome to 6 Minute English,

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A2 rob chef programme cliche restaurant rebecca

Making food photo-friendly: 6 Minute English

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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