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  • Hello, and welcome to today's Grammar Gameshow!

  • I'm your host, Will!

  • To market,

  • to market, to buy a fat pig!

  • Then home again, home again,

  • jiggety-jig.

  • And of course, let's not forget

  • Leslie, our all-knowing voice in the sky.

  • Hello, everyone!

  • Tonight we're going to ask you three questions about

  • Articles!

  • The definite, indefinite and the zero

  • that help us to define our nouns.

  • OK! Now, let's meet our contestants!

  • A married couple!

  • How do, all. My name's Alfie.

  • And contestant number two?

  • It's nice to meet you. I'm Clara.

  • Really, Leslie?

  • A married couple?

  • I mean, we must be getting desperate.

  • So, how long have you two been married then?

  • 20 years.

  • It's been 24, dear.

  • Oh, yes… 24.

  • Happy.

  • Oh, yes. Happy years

  • under the thumb, as it were, eh?

  • Must you?

  • I don't know Clara, must I?

  • OK! Well, everything seems hunky-dory here.

  • So, let's get going, and don't forget,

  • you can play along at home too.

  • Our first round is a closest-gets-it round.

  • How many types of article are there?

  • I'll say

  • Oi!

  • What happened to ladies first?

  • The key is in the word lady.

  • I'll say two.

  • And Clara?

  • There are three.

  • A or an, the and a zero article.

  • He would know if he paid attention to something

  • other than football.

  • Correct!

  • About the answer, I mean,

  • not the football.

  • Yeah, well you'd…

  • Next question!

  • Which of these articles is used with

  • singular countable nouns?

  • After you, my darling.

  • Oh, Alfie!

  • Oh, blimey!

  • A or an is used with singular countable nouns.

  • The zero article is used with plural and

  • uncountable nouns,

  • and the definite article is used with shared knowledge.

  • Correct!

  • Leslie?

  • Articles appear before nouns.

  • There are three types:

  • the indefinite article, which is used with

  • singular countable nouns.

  • For example,

  • I see a tree or I see an apple.

  • The zero article,

  • which is used with plural or uncountable nouns.

  • For example, I've got rice.

  • And the definite article,

  • which is used with any noun that is known and

  • understood by both the speaker and listener.

  • For example, I opened a cupboard and the door fell off.

  • Well done.

  • So, Clara,

  • what do you like most about Alfie?

  • Oh, he's just the sweetest man.

  • You know, when he's not being the silent type.

  • The silent type!

  • More like I can't get a word in edgeways, eh?

  • Yack, yack, yackeddy-yack.

  • Well, I wouldn't have to if you'd pay me some attention!

  • We sit together watching TV!

  • What else do you

  • OK! OK!

  • Sorry I asked

  • sort of.

  • Let's move on to round two.

  • Complete these sentences using the correct article.

  • I'm afraid, you'll have to confer,

  • I can only accept one answer.

  • It's certainly ___ lovely painting.

  • John works as ___ engineer.

  • Do you have ___ pen?

  • * arguing *

  • OK, time's up!

  • And?

  • The indefinite article! A or an.

  • Alfie, that's not what we agreed!

  • I'm right sometimes, you know!

  • A or an.

  • OK. Leslie?

  • Correct!

  • The indefinite article is either a or an.

  • It is used in front of a noun when

  • we inform a listener about it for the first time.

  • We also use it with a noun being used

  • in a description,

  • such as in sentence A

  • It's certainly a lovely painting.

  • It's also used with noun being used in classifying

  • or defining, particularly in connection with a job,

  • such as in sentence B

  • John works as an engineer.

  • And finally, we use it when we talk about

  • a thing but do not wish or need to be specific,

  • such as in sentence C

  • Do you have a pen?

  • Yes! In your face!

  • Oh, sorry my love.

  • Are you, OK?

  • I'm fine!

  • I'm fine!

  • Well, OK! Not to worry.

  • You've got twenty more points each.

  • So, tell me Alfie. How did you two meet?

  • Well, we met at a party at university.

  • It was nothing special. Except

  • well,

  • our eyes met across a crowded room,

  • and I was drawn to her like a magnet.

  • I knew then that she was the one for me.

  • Oh, Alfie! I remember it well.

  • He was such an attractive young fellow.

  • We danced all night.

  • Of course, he's getting on a bit now.

  • Doesn't have much stamina like he used to.

  • Yeah?

  • Well you're not exactly a size six any more, are you?

  • Elephant britches.

  • My mother told me never to marry you!

  • Yeah? Well, you should have listened to her then!

  • I should've

  • OK! OK! I'm sorry I asked

  • in a way.

  • Let's just put this all behind us and move on to

  • our last round.

  • Look at these words and tell me if they take

  • a zero article or a definite article.

  • Ready?

  • Work.

  • Zero.

  • He's always too busy to call me at work.

  • Correct!

  • Home.

  • Zero.

  • I'm not coming home!

  • Correct!

  • Dinner.

  • Zero.

  • You won't see me at dinner.

  • Correct!

  • Dog.

  • Whose dog?

  • Your dog.

  • Definite article.

  • I'm keeping the dog!

  • Correct!

  • Bed.

  • Zero.

  • You won't find me in bed tonight.

  • Correct!

  • Superlatives, for example, best.

  • She's the best thing that's ever happened to me.

  • Correct!

  • Sun.

  • He's like the sun in the sky to me.

  • Correct!

  • Life.

  • Zero.

  • Life can be hard for some people.

  • She makes mine better.

  • Correct!

  • Last one.

  • University.

  • Zero.

  • We met at university.

  • Hang on.

  • Definite article.

  • I'll meet you at the university.

  • Zero! At university!

  • Definite. At the university.

  • OK, OK! Settle down.

  • Allow us. Leslie?

  • Excellent work!

  • Many nouns have specific rules

  • as to which article to use.

  • We usually use the zero article when we talk about our

  • homes, beds and meals, such as dinner.

  • We also use it when talking about things in general,

  • such as life.

  • We use the definite article with unique things,

  • such as the sun, superlatives,

  • and nouns which are known to both speakers.

  • Finally, institutions such as hospitals, prisons,

  • and universities can often be either.

  • If we are in the hospital, it describes the place.

  • But if we are in hospital, we are probably injured.

  • There you go.

  • So you're both right in a way!

  • No, I'm right!

  • No, I'm right!

  • OK, OK! Enough!

  • Just stop for a second and take some advice.

  • See, I was married once.

  • They were some of the happiest,

  • and saddest years of my life

  • but that was such a long time ago.

  • Now, take a deep breath.

  • And look into each other's eyes.

  • Your eyes!

  • I'd forgotten how beautiful they are.

  • We were fools to argue. Let's never argue again!

  • Let's never say another word!

  • Embrace me!

  • Like a broken record, you are!

  • Enough!

  • For better or for worse, in sickness and in health,

  • till death do us part.

  • It looks like we'll need two more contestants.

  • Thanks for joining us.

  • Say goodbye Leslie.

  • Tchauzinho, Leslie.

  • See you next time.

Hello, and welcome to today's Grammar Gameshow!

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A2 article alfie definite leslie correct clara

Articles: The Grammar Gameshow Episode 28

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/01
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