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  • unlike the cat in the hat, I cannot read with my eyes shut.

  • But the National Institutes of Health says through his wacky and subliminally educational books, Dr Seuss improved Children's health.

  • He helped them develop literacy skills.

  • That's not the only healthy effect of reading.

  • When you think about reading just the idea of being able to focus on something in particular that's not a big screen, not a device can really be a benefit.

  • There been studies that have shown that it can help reduce your stress levels, help improve your attention levels and possibly be overall good for your mental functions.

  • You could reduce your rates of cognitive decline by up to 32%.

  • This is significant.

  • It's fascinating to see how the brain responds, even if the body is sitting still looking at those pages.

  • So, for example, if there is a scene that you're reading, that's a very active scene.

  • The areas of the brain that are called the motor cortex that were responsible for movement.

  • They may start the light up if it's a particularly stimulating part of the book that you're reading your sensory cortex, which actually allows you to see that may start to light up.

  • There been some interesting studies showing that you don't actually have to read a book.

  • I recommend this one.

  • By the way, you could actually hear books you couldn't listen to an audiobook, for example, and that can have some of the same beneficial effects that we're talking about.

  • So just keep in mind the more you read, the more you know, the more you learn, the further you go.

  • That was a different doctor, Dr Seuss, but regardless, it will help you live to 100.

unlike the cat in the hat, I cannot read with my eyes shut.

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Could Reading Make You Live Longer?

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/06/29
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