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  • - Hello and welcome back to English with Lucy.

  • I'm trying again with my new microphone,

  • hopefully it works, we'll see.

  • Today, we're going to be talking about two verbs,

  • that often confuse my students

  • and the verbs are to lend and to borrow.

  • Now, these verbs are so confusing,

  • because they mean roughly the same thing.

  • The only difference is the direction.

  • Now, I've got some secret tricks, that I can give you today,

  • that will make sure that you use these verbs correctly

  • 100% of the time.

  • I've got some good methods of remembering which is which

  • and we're going to put them into practise today as well.

  • So firstly, what do they mean?

  • Well, to lend means to give something to somebody

  • for a limited amount of time,

  • so you expect to receive it back.

  • To borrow, on the other hand, means to receive something

  • for a limited amount of time

  • and they expect you to give it back.

  • So to lend means to give

  • and to borrow means to receive,

  • both for a limited amount of time.

  • The verb, to borrow, is regular,

  • the infinitive, to borrow,

  • the past simple, borrowed

  • and the past participle, borrowed again.

  • Lend on the other hand is irregular,

  • the infinitive, lend,

  • the past simple, lent

  • and the past participle, lent.

  • Now, I always tell my students that in order to remember it,

  • you need to think of the syllables,

  • lend, one syllable, give, one syllable,

  • borrow, two syllables, receive, two syllables,

  • so we know that lend, give, borrow, receive,

  • easy as that.

  • So let's put this into practise then.

  • I'm going to use my lovely cousins, John and Katie,

  • John and Katie, I hope you don't mind,

  • so John needs 10 pounds

  • and Katie has 10 pounds,

  • so John could say, "Katie, can you lend me 10 pounds?"

  • He could also say, "Katie, can I borrow 10 pounds?"

  • but he could not say,

  • "Katie, can you borrow me 10 pounds?"

  • and that's a mistake, that I often hear.

  • Now, Katie has got the 10 pounds

  • and she would like to give it to John

  • for that limited amount of time, so she could say,

  • "Yes John, I can lend you 10 pounds,"

  • she could also say, "Yes John, you can borrow 10 pounds,"

  • but she can't say, "Yes John, I can borrow you 10 pounds,"

  • so just remember that.

  • So make sure you understand the direction in this situation.

  • John has borrowed 10 pounds from Katie,

  • same situation, different direction.

  • Katie has lent 10 pounds to John,

  • so John has borrowed from Katie,

  • he's received the 10 pounds

  • and Katie has lent 10 pounds to John,

  • she's given him 10 pounds.

  • So, hopefully that is a little bit clearer.

  • Now I would like to test you, so we're going to have a quiz.

  • I'm going to give you five seconds to guess the answer

  • and then the answer will appear.

  • OK, so let's look at number one,

  • Could you mm me your Ferrari?

  • Could you mm me your Ferrari?

  • Which one will it be?

  • OK, the answer is lend,

  • could you lend me your Ferrari

  • and we know that it's lend, because we've got me,

  • I could say, could you give me your Ferrari,

  • I couldn't say, could you receive me your Ferrari.

  • So if you're in doubt, try it with give or receive

  • and that should tell you which one it will be.

  • OK, number two.

  • No way! Last time you mm my Ferrari, you crashed it!

  • No way! Last time you mm my Ferrari, you crashed it!

  • Which will it be?

  • OK, the answer is borrowed.

  • Make sure you think of the verb in its correct form.

  • No way! Last time you borrowed my Ferrari, you crashed it!

  • No way! Last time you borrowed my Ferrari, you crashed it!

  • So, number three.

  • I mm this t-shirt from Felicity.

  • I mm this t-shirt from Felicity.

  • Which one is it?

  • It's borrowed.

  • The reason it's borrowed is because we've got from,

  • I borrow from, I lend to.

  • OK, number four.

  • Did you mm him your PS4?

  • Did you mm him your PS4?

  • Which one is it?

  • It's lend, did you lend him your PS4?

  • Did you lend him your PS4?

  • We've got him, so we know it's lend.

  • OK, number five.

  • You shouldn't mm money.

  • You shouldn't mm money.

  • Which one is it, this one's difficult.

  • OK, this one was a trick one,

  • it can be both borrow or lend.

  • You shouldn't lend money, you shouldn't borrow money.

  • That's not my opinion, by the way.

  • Alright guys, that's it for today's lesson.

  • You should now understand how to use

  • lend and borrow correctly.

  • Just a quick reminder for you,

  • I now do a free, live pronunciation lesson

  • every Sunday at 4:30 London GMT time

  • and this is on my Facebook page,

  • which is called English with Lucy,

  • so the lesson lasts one hour and throughout that hour,

  • you can write your pronunciation queries,

  • i.e. words that you don't know how to pronounce

  • and I will pronounce them for you

  • and it's great fun, we did it last week as well

  • and loads of you tuned in

  • and I'm starting to recognise more and more names

  • and it's really nice to chat with you,

  • so make sure you tune in for that.

  • Don't forget to connect with me on all of my social media,

  • which is right here in front of my face (laughs)

  • and I'll see you very, very soon for another lesson.

  • Now, Katie could reply firstly with, "No way!" (laughs)

  • Now, I've got some tricks, that I'm going to tell you today,

  • that will...

- Hello and welcome back to English with Lucy.

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A2 lend borrow katie ferrari borrowed john

LEND or BORROW? | British English Grammar

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/06/19
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