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  • - Oh that is a,

  • oh that piece keeps on going.

  • (upbeat music)

  • - Good morning everyone it's Mark Wiens

  • with migrationology.com in Hong Kong.

  • I just took the metro to Sham Shui Po

  • and on our way to have a quick breakfast this morning.

  • (upbeat music)

  • (customers chatting)

  • - Only one.

  • - [Mark] Scrambled egg beef sandwich for one

  • and then lemon tea and coffee.

  • This is a classic and they serve a number

  • of my tea has just arrived.

  • It was just about a five minute walk

  • from the metro station and this place is famous

  • for their breakfast especially their sandwiches.

  • So we came here to have a tea and a sandwich

  • and it's kind of right within a market area

  • and luckily there was a table right in the back

  • with available seats.

  • My tea and sandwich came out literally seconds

  • after ordering and this is one of my beverages

  • of choice in Hong Kong which is a lemon tea.

  • I love how they just slice up,

  • that's at least half a lemon just sliced up

  • and put into a cup of dark black tea,

  • and what you do, if you really squish down

  • that lemon, release all of that lemon juice

  • and that lemon peel, get all of that goodness out of there

  • into the tea and then I think a lot

  • of people would add sugar to this,

  • but I like it just black tea, no sugar,

  • and just that strong lemon.

  • (gasps)

  • Oh that'll wake you up in the morning.

  • Oh that's sour, really really sour!

  • It will almost make you squint

  • and then it's really strong black tea that,

  • yeah, it's delicious and it's so soothing

  • on the throat.

  • The main thing I came to eat here though is the toasted beef

  • and egg sandwich and again, this came out

  • literally in like seconds.

  • Let's take a look inside.

  • I think it's like a oh, oh it looks awesome on the inside.

  • I wasn't expecting it to look that good on the inside.

  • There's minced meat, there's egg in here,

  • and then just toasted bread.

  • Oh that looks fantastic.

  • The beef is so tender and then just coat it in egg

  • and then with that white bread toast,

  • it has maybe a sesame oil flavor to it.

  • That is a very good delicious breakfast sandwich.

  • And I think it goes fantastic with lemon tea.

  • For my next half, I think I'm gonna bump up the taste level

  • by adding some of the chili oil to it,

  • but it is really good.

  • It's remarkably simple and good.

  • This is the chili oil that's used

  • for the noodles that they serve here,

  • but I'm gonna take advantage of it.

  • All right, I'll add maybe a bit more.

  • The dried chili oil maybe

  • and some kind of sesame oil or something.

  • Mm!

  • That steps up the level of flavor one more notch.

  • I don't need too much oil

  • but that dried chili is just stunning.

  • You just add it to that bite there.

  • I'm gonna put away the chili

  • before I consume the entire bottle.

  • This is like a five star omelet sandwich.

  • Thank you, thank you.

  • (people speaking in a foreign language)

  • The tea was good, but that beef egg sandwich

  • was the real reason that it was well worth coming here

  • so simple but so good, perfect amount of butter

  • and he whips up all the sandwiches

  • and cups out the tee

  • and the drinks from just a little tiny like kitchen

  • within the cafe and they have been doing it since 1968

  • and, yeah, just a classic little cafe in Hong Kong

  • and by the way they do also have bowls of noodles

  • and they have a pretty good selection

  • of different dishes on their menu but I just came

  • for that toasted beef and egg sandwich,

  • and I wasn't disappointed.

  • We are just walking around this market area.

  • There is a lot going on around here

  • and a lot of fruits and vegetables.

  • Ying is about to buy some more cherries.

  • (women speaking in foreign language)

  • We are coming in here to the fresh wet market now.

  • That is a lot of meat

  • and we're gonna just walk around here for a little while.

  • Oh there's seafood there's meat

  • and visiting fresh wet markets along with eating

  • is one of my favorite things to do when I travel.

  • (upbeat music)

  • You can get any type of food at this market

  • and we just passed through the meat and fish section,

  • seafood section, and now moving on.

  • Well lot's of tofu and preserved vegetables

  • and moving on into more of the fresh vegetable section.

  • There's some stalls that are so busy it's hard

  • to even get a glimpse of what they're selling.

  • So many people are fighting to get the fish and the meat.

  • (upbeat music)

  • It's starting to drizzle again this morning.

  • It's been very rainy so far this trip to Hong Kong

  • but it doesn't look like it's gonna rain too much today.

  • We are walking over to a place now to eat noodles.

  • I don't know a whole lot about this restaurant

  • but when I was doing research

  • for where to eat won ton noodles,

  • I came across this place and what I like about it

  • is that they still made the noodles using a bamboo pole

  • to press the dough, and so I'm hoping

  • that I'm gonna get a chance to see them making the noodles,

  • not fully sure but gonna go check it out and see.

  • (men speaking in foreign language)

  • We made it to the restaurant just as they opened

  • and this restaurant has an interesting story.

  • It's actually a newly opened restaurant in 2010,

  • but the owner got his recipe for making the noodles

  • from his grandfather who had a restaurant

  • or a shop in Macau and made the traditional style noodles

  • and kneaded the dough with a bamboo pole

  • and so they still make the noodles the traditional way here

  • and unfortunately, I don't think I'm gonna have a chance

  • to see them making the noodles,

  • but they have a room in the front

  • you can see the bamboo poles.

  • So when they still need to make noodles,

  • they still make them that way,

  • and so I'll have a chance to try the noodles

  • but maybe not see them being made.

  • Ying and I got two different dishes to share

  • and they have come out.

  • They look fantastic and these are bamboo kneaded noodles.

  • This is the classic bowl of won ton on noodles with soup

  • and shrimp dumpling.

  • Let me just taste the broth first.

  • (slurps)

  • Mm!

  • Oh that is a richly flavorful broth.

  • I think it's fish based broth

  • and then you can taste kind of like the flower

  • of the noodles within there are well.

  • Grab chop sticks and before doing any seasoning,

  • I just gotta taste those noodles.

  • And this is very light and you can just see the beauty

  • of these noodles.

  • Yeah, look at that individual-ness of the...

  • (laughs)

  • Okay, I don't know if that made any sense,

  • but they do look good.

  • Mm!

  • It has like a little bit of a rubbery texture to them

  • but then at the same time they chew very easily

  • and just sort of like almost dissolve in your mouth.

  • Mm!

  • It's awesome, like a slight rubbery al dente,

  • not really al dente more of like a very tiny elasticity

  • like almost like your chewing on a rubber band,

  • but then it just breaks.

  • Probably go for one of the won ton.

  • Mm!

  • Filled with shrimp!

  • Oh that's delicious.

  • The owner said he used the dry chili oil for the soup

  • and then there's a different chili sauce

  • for the other noodle.

  • Okay let me add some of this chili.

  • This is the dry chili oil.

  • Oh this looks fantastic.

  • Oh and that smells just so good.

  • I'll just add a little bit to start with.

  • (customers speaking in foreign language)

  • Mix this around, oh oh yes.

  • Follow that with some soup.

  • Mm!

  • That adds some nice heat to it

  • and then I can feel that chili oil down my throat.

  • Oh that's a wonderful burn.

  • The texture of those noodles is amazing.

  • It really has a little like rubbery factor to it,

  • but it's fantastic.

  • They're bouncy, that's what they are, they're bouncy

  • and this has probably gotten a little bit dried out.

  • These are like tossed noodles

  • so I'm gonna re-toss them a little bit

  • and this is with beef brisket.

  • Oh, you can immediately smell that like braised aroma

  • to that brisket.

  • Now let me just taste a few strands of noodle

  • before adding anything again.

  • There's just a very light sauce to it.

  • The bounciness and they don't really have a strong

  • like starchy taste to them,

  • and then he gave me some of this chili sauce

  • to add to these noodles he said.

  • I'm gonna scoop it on, or maybe wipe it all out.

  • I didn't want any of it to go to waste.

  • All right, toss them up a bit

  • and on the noodles, it's just a very light glaze

  • but I think it's some of the broth from

  • that beef brisket has a beefy,

  • a very light beefy taste to it.

  • That chili sauce is a little bit sour

  • and it has like an amazing like almost nutty flavor to it.

  • And it's a little bit spicy.

  • Oh yeah, that is tender indeed,

  • and it has that wonderful like star anise flavor to it.

  • It is, that's good.

  • I'm really enjoying these noodles,

  • but I really love this soup.

  • Oh man it is so good.

  • (slurping)

  • (man speaking in foreign language)

  • But normally it's every day.

  • - Uh, not every day, maybe three or four times a week.

  • - Oh okay, but all of the noodles

  • are made with the bamboo pole?

  • - Yes.

  • - All right, thank you.

  • Those were some serious good quality noodles.

  • I enjoyed that and I was just talking with the owner,

  • he said that all of the noodles that you'll eat at the shop

  • are all made with the traditional way, using the bamboo

  • to knead the dough, but if you come,

  • he said about three or four times per week

  • they make the noodles and sometime in the afternoon.

  • So if you are lucky not only will you get to eat the noodles

  • but also see them being made.

  • And also I should just quickly mention that the bamboo pole

  • kneading method for noodles is becoming very very rare.

  • It is a traditional way to make noodles

  • and it's very very hard to find these days in Hong Kong.

  • We're heading to the subway station

  • and going down a couple stops to Mong Kok.

  • (carefree music)

  • This is one of the busiest areas of Hong Kong,

  • a big shopping area.

  • The streets are just clogged with signs and stores

  • and lots and lots of people.

  • One of the things that's just crazy about this area

  • of Hong Kong is the signage.

  • There are so many billboards and so many signs