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  • (upbeat music)

  • - Hello everyone and welcome back to English with Lucy.

  • I have got such a treat for you today!

  • I've been excited about this for such a long time.

  • I am shortly going to welcome two lovely guests

  • who have generously given their time

  • to help teach you the differences

  • between Australian English, American English,

  • and British English.

  • This is going to be a two-part series,

  • today, we are going to focus on vocabulary

  • and then in the next part of the video,

  • we are focusing on pronunciation.

  • We may all speak the same language: English,

  • but we have very different accents

  • and we speak with different vocabularies.

  • So this video is perfect for improving your vocabulary

  • but if you want to improve your pronunciation

  • and your listening skills even further,

  • then I highly recommend the special method

  • of combining reading books

  • whilst listening to their audiobook counterpart on Audible.

  • This is how you use the method.

  • Take a book that you have already read in English

  • or a book that you would like to read in English,

  • I've got plenty of recommendations down below

  • in the description box, and read that book

  • whilst listening to the audiobook version on Audible.

  • Reading alone will not help you with your pronunciation

  • because English isn't a strictly phonetic language.

  • The way a word is written in English

  • may not give you much indication at all

  • as to how it's pronounced in English.

  • But if you listen to a word

  • at the same time as reading it,

  • your brain will start making connections.

  • And the next time you hear that word,

  • you'll know exactly how it's spelt,

  • and the next time you see that word written down,

  • you'll know exactly how it's pronounced.

  • It is such an effective method

  • and the best part is you can get one free audiobook,

  • that's a 30-day free trial on Audible,

  • all you've got to do is on the link

  • in the description box and sign up.

  • I've got loads of recommendations down there for you.

  • Right, let's get on with the lesson and welcome our guests.

  • Firstly, I would like to welcome Emma to the channel.

  • - Hey there, I'm Emma from the mmmEnglish YouTube channel,

  • coming at you from Perth in Western Australia.

  • - And we also have Vanessa.

  • - Hi I'm Vanessa and I live in North Carolina in the U.S..

  • I run the YouTube channel Speak English With Vanessa.

  • - It's so lovely to have Emma and Vanessa on the channel.

  • I've known Emma for a very, very long time,

  • four years now and I've recently got to know Vanessa.

  • Both of them have fantastic YouTube channels

  • and all of their information is in the description box

  • if you want to follow them.

  • So I have got some pictures and Vanessa, Emma

  • and I are going to tell you how we would say

  • what's in these pictures in our own country.

  • You might be surprised at some of the answers.

  • Okay so let's start with this one.

  • - In the U.S. these are chips, 100% just chips.

  • - I can't believe you started with this one.

  • These are chips.

  • - We call these crisps, crisps.

  • - The other word that you used, Lucy,

  • is the most complicated word in the English language to say.

  • So let's just call them chips and move along.

  • - Yeah, I'll give you that one.

  • Crisps is a notoriously difficult word

  • for learners of English.

  • It's the sps sound at the end, crisps.

  • You'll find a lot of people mispronouncing them as crips,

  • crips, when they should be crisps.

  • So here is the next one and it gets even more complicated

  • because in the UK we call these chips.

  • So in the U.S., the cold version is chips

  • and in the UK the hot version is chips.

  • Let's see it what Vanessa has to say about this.

  • What does she call them?

  • - These are French fries.

  • I know that they're not really French

  • but we still call them French fries

  • or you can just say fries by themselves.

  • - The next one's chips as well, right?

  • They're hot chips. - Hot chips, oh my god!

  • Hot chips, Australians just call everything chips then.

  • It is worth noting that if you go to England

  • and you order fries or French fries,

  • we know exactly what you mean.

  • Okay, next we have this one.

  • - We call these cookies

  • or chocolate chip cookies specifically.

  • - Okay they are biscuits.

  • Don't really hear people saying cookie.

  • - Yes, two against one!

  • These for us are biscuits as well

  • and we would use cookie to refer to an American style,

  • normally, chocolate chip cookie.

  • However if you use the word biscuit in the United States,

  • you might get something that you are not expecting.

  • Vanessa has more on this.

  • - If you ask someone, "Do you have any biscuits?"

  • or, "I want a biscuit," they would not give you this,

  • instead they'd give you a savoury kind

  • of fluffy type piece of bread.

  • A biscuit is savoury and a cookie is sweet.

  • - So there we have it.

  • If you fancy something sweet with your coffee in America,

  • don't ask for a biscuit. (chuckles)

  • You will be bitterly disappointed.

  • Okay, Vanessa got very passionate about this next one.

  • Very passionate.

  • Here is the picture.

  • Vanessa seems to think

  • that she knows the absolute correct answer

  • and she's even done research.

  • I did not expect Emma and Vanessa

  • to get books out for this video.

  • - I have the proof that my answer is the most correct

  • because you can see my two-year-old son is obsessed

  • with trucks, we have so many truck books.

  • Let me read to you.

  • What truck do you need?

  • A tractor trailer. (chuckles)

  • So this is also what I would call it a tractor trailer.

  • I might call it a semi.

  • - Alright that yellow thing is a truck.

  • - So Vanessa thinks it's a tractor trailer

  • and she's very, very sure about it.

  • - In all of these books, they call it a tractor trailer

  • so we're gonna go with that one.

  • - That really tickled me.

  • - Emma thinks it's a truck.

  • In the UK we would call this a lorry, a lorry.

  • - It's a truck.

  • - Whatever Emma, it's a lorry.

  • Okay, what about this next one?

  • What have the women got up here?

  • - These girls all have bangs.

  • - We would definitely say fringe.

  • Bangs is probably becoming more popular,

  • especially colloquially.

  • - So in the UK, we definitely call this a fringe

  • and when I started hearing the word bangs in movies

  • and things like that,

  • I was really genuinely confused.

  • Okay what about this next one?

  • - This is candy.

  • - They are lollies, lollies.

  • - Lollies, that is so cute!

  • So in British English these are sweets.

  • Or sometimes if you're talking to a child,

  • they might call them sweeties.

  • Lollies for us are sweets on a stick.

  • Right, what about this next one?

  • - This is a swimsuit.

  • Some people might call it a bathing suit,

  • you can also call this a one-piece.

  • - Okay, this one's really funny.

  • In Melbourne where I'm from,

  • it's really common to call them togs

  • but no one else in Australia really calls them togs,

  • they call it swimmers.

  • In Sydney they call them cozzies or costumes

  • but generally it's swimmers or bathers.

  • Oh gosh, that's another one, bathers or swimmers.

  • - Oh my word, I did not expect to receive

  • so many different ways of saying swimming costume.

  • This for us is a swimming costume.

  • We can also say one-piece

  • and we can also shorten it down to cozzy.

  • I remember my mum saying, "get your cosy on,"

  • before my swimming lessons when I was a child

  • but that's quite a childish thing.

  • Okay what about this next one?

  • - This is the forest.

  • - That is definitely a forest.

  • - No!

  • It's the woods, woods, plural.

  • This is definitely the woods.

  • I mean in general we say the woods.

  • Forest implies a huge, huge area of trees, of woodland.

  • - The woods sounds kind of like something you might hear

  • in an old-fashioned fairy tale.

  • - Yeah well, Vanessa, sometimes life

  • in England is like an old-fashioned fairy tale.

  • I think a lot of Americans have this vision of England

  • as a place with so much culture and history,

  • like a fairy tale, and then they come over

  • and they are just so disappointed.

  • Okay what about this next one?

  • - This is a bathroom.

  • You might say it's a restroom

  • but it would be really unusual to call a place

  • that actually has a bathtub a restroom.

  • Usually we use the term restroom for public places.

  • - That room is a bathroom.

  • Yeah, it's a bathroom.

  • - Okay so Vanessa touched on restroom and bathroom.

  • Now we would never use the word restroom in British English.

  • If we were in a public place

  • and we are looking for a bathroom, we would say toilet.

  • However if there is a bath there, like a bathtub,

  • then yes, we might say bathroom as well.

  • But we would ask where's the toilet.

  • - If you say where's the toilet,

  • most people in the US would just say,

  • "It's in the bathroom."

  • - I mean she is not wrong.

  • The toilet is in the bathroom.

  • There is also a slang word which I use a lot

  • which is the loo, where's the loo.

  • I went to the States for a business trip

  • and I asked people where the loo was

  • and they were utterly confused.

  • "The loo, what's the loo?"

  • All right let's move on to the next.

  • - This is an apartment.

  • This is mostly called an apartment.

  • - We would never say flat.

  • - Okay so in British English this is a flat.

  • We have a block of flats;

  • I've lived in many flats in my life.

  • We don't use the word apartment.

  • Okay the next one.

  • Maybe the picture wasn't clear enough for this one

  • because Emma did get a bit confused

  • but she gave us all of the options, good old Emma.

  • - This is a grocery store.

  • - I'm not exactly sure what I'm looking at in that image

  • but it could be a trolley, it could be an aisle,

  • or it could be a supermarket.

  • - A bingo, it's a supermarket for us as well,

  • or we call it the shops.

  • I'm going to the supermarket; I'm going to the shops.

  • The shops is more general, it could mean any type of shop.

  • We would never say grocery store.

  • We might however say grocers, the grocers.

  • This is a shop that just sells fruits and vegetables.

  • All right, next one.

  • - This is a comforter.

  • - Oh my god, how weird is the word comforter?

  • That's weird.

  • In Australia that's called a doona.

  • - (laughs) I love that Emma is saying

  • that the word comforter is weird

  • and then she goes to say that in Australia it's a doona.

  • That's weirder, Emma.

  • So in British English this is a duvet, a duvet,