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  • Eat Sleep Dreamers I know that so many of you are learning English for work and for

  • your careers. You have lots of English speaking clients and colleagues and you want to understand

  • them and you want to communicate with them. And they are using every day natural English

  • vocabulary. Well that's why I'm doing this lesson. This is the ten essential phrasal

  • verbs for work. Phrasal verbs are by definition informal phrases and so you have to be careful

  • about the context in which you use them. For example in an official written document or

  • contract you're not going to use phrasal verbs but if you are working in a small team of

  • colleagues and you have regular meetings you're going to use phrasal verbs all the time. So

  • you have to think about the context in which you use them. Now I have done a lesson teaching

  • you how to use phrasal verbs and if you haven't seen that lesson before I suggest that you

  • stop and watch it now before continuing with this video. Alright, the link is just above

  • me. It will teach you how to use phrasal verbs perfectly. Alright, if you are ready, let's get started

  • Right, our first phrasal verb, 'set up'. Now set up has different meanings, we are going

  • to look at two of them. The first one is to start something like an organisation or a

  • business. For example 'I set up the company in my twenties'. If we have a look at that

  • sentence, we've got set up, means to start and then the company , that's the object,

  • ok? Now with set up you can put the object either after the verb and the particle or

  • you can put it in between the verb and the particle. So I could say 'I set the company

  • up in my twenties' or I could say 'I set up the company in my twenties'. So this is a

  • phrasal verb that can be split. You can put the object in the middle or afterwards. Now

  • the other meaning of set up that we're going to look at is to organise or to arrange. For

  • example a meeting or a conference call, things like that. So my example sentence would be

  • 'Can you set up a meeting for tomorrow?' And that means can you organise or can you arrange

  • a meeting for tomorrow. Number two 'to run something past someone'. This is brilliant,

  • I love this one. So the meaning is to show someone an idea or a proposal and you want

  • to get their advice or their feedback. So if I wanted your advice or your opinion about

  • my work I would say 'Can I run my idea past you?' or 'Can I run my idea by you?' And that

  • is saying can I show it to you, this idea or proposal and can you give me some advice,

  • can you look at it and give me some advice or some feedback. Can you tell me what I need

  • to improve or can you tell me that you like it. So to run something past someone. So you

  • run an idea past someone or you run a proposal. Can I run my email past you? or can i run

  • my project past you? It could be past or by so can I run my project by you, it's the same

  • meaning. So run something by or past someone. So this is particularly good if you are working

  • on a project or you are working on something that you want to get some advice about before

  • you show it to your boss or you present it. So it's a nice one with colleagues and people

  • that work around you.

  • Number three, 'to copy someone in' or 'to copy in someone'. This is referring to emails

  • so this is to include someone on an email that you are sending to other people. Now

  • as you saw there you can put the object in between copy and in or afterwards, copy in

  • somebody. Now in my example sentence you are going to notice that I'm going to put it in

  • between. So 'I'll copy you in on all the team's emails'. Now the reason why I've put you in

  • between the verb and the particle is because it's a personal pronoun and if it's a personal

  • pronoun like you or me then it has to go in between the verb and the particle. I can't

  • say 'I'll copy in you' it doesn't work, alright? I have to put it in between. So 'I'll copy

  • you in on all the emails.' Remember with the grammar of phrasal verbs, it all goes in the

  • verb, ok? So if you want to talk about the past tense, you'll say 'I copied you in'.

  • If you want to do it in the present perfect you'd say 'I have copied you in'. So it's

  • all in the verb, the grammar goes into the verb.

  • Number four, 'to pencil in' or 'to pencil something in'. Now this means to arrange something

  • in the future but you re aware that the plan might change. So that's why you are doing

  • it with a pencil instead of a pen, because it's less permanent. So you are arranging

  • something in the future that could be changed.

  • So maybe the time could change or the day or to be honest even the event might change.

  • But you are saying to someone that yeah let's make an arrangement in the future but it might

  • change. So for example 'Let's pencil in a meeting for next Friday'. Again, pencil something

  • in or pencil in something, so the object, in this case the meeting, can going between

  • the verb and the particle or afterwards, it doesn't matter. So 'let's pencil in a meeting

  • for next Friday.'

  • Number five, 'go over'. This means to review something. So you might go over a contract

  • or a presentation or anything to be honest. So in this example sentence 'Let's go over

  • the presentation one more time'. So we're saying let's review it, let's have a look,

  • see if we can change it, make any additions, any improvements. So let's go over it one

  • more time, let's review it.

  • Number six 'deal with'. Now deal with means to handle or to work on. So for example 'The

  • HR team deal with all the interviews' that means they handle it, they take responsibility

  • for it. You might talk about your responsibilities in your job 'I have to deal with a lot of

  • client complaints' for example so I have to be responsible for, I have to handle, I have

  • to work on them. You might also say 'I have to deal with a lot of phone calls'. So again,

  • I have to handle them, I have to be responsible for them. It's a part of my job.

  • Number seven, 'to take over' this means to begin to do something that someone else was

  • doing. For example 'Who is going to take over your job when you leave?' It can also be a

  • temporary thing for example 'Can you take over the project whilst I'm on holiday?' and

  • so that means can you take responsibility for it for a short time, I'll go away and

  • then I'll come back. So yeah, to take over something. Or you can take something over.

  • So it can be split. So 'who is going to take over your job when you leave?' or 'who is

  • going to take over your job when you leave?' Your job is the object, it can go either in

  • between the verb and the particle or after.

  • Number eight, 'to fall through'. If a business deal or plan or arrangement falls through

  • it doesn't happen, it fails. So for example 'Google's plan to buy Amazon fell through'

  • it means it didn't work, it didn't succeed. So if something falls through, it doesn't

  • work, it doesn't succeed.

  • Number nine, 'pick up'. Now pick up can have lots of different meanings, the one we're

  • going to look at here is to suddenly increase or improve after a bad period. If we are talking

  • about number or results or sales, if they pick up, that means they have improved after

  • a bad start. So maybe the sales weren't very good to begin with, we weren't selling enough

  • and then if they pick up, they improve, the curve kind of goes upwards and that's a good

  • thing, a positive thing. So if you said 'I hope the sales are going to pick up' it means

  • you hope that the sales are going to increase or improve.

  • And the final one 'report back'. If you report back to someone you are telling them information

  • that you have discovered, that you have researched, that you have found out. So usually it's to

  • someone in authority like your boss for example but it can just be to your team, to your colleagues.

  • So for example I might say 'After the conference I'll report back with anything interesting'.

  • And I'm saying there that I'll go to the conference, I'll learn new things or discover new things,

  • I'll come back and if there's anything interesting that I think you would like, I will tell you,

  • I will report back. So to report back.

  • Alright guys, that was ten phrasal verbs for work. Did you find those useful? Let me know

  • in the comments below. Which ones are you going to be able to use at your work? And

  • would you like another one of these phrasal verb lessons? We could do phrasal verbs for

  • travel or phrasal verbs for studying. Anything like that, so let me know. If you would like

  • another phrasal verbs lesson, tell me in the comments below.

  • Guys if you haven't already, please go and check out my Patreon community where i am

  • offering loads of extra English resources for you guys in return for your support. So

  • please go and check it out, I think you'll love it. There's live Q and A sessions with

  • me. There's lesson plans and worksheets for lessons like this. There are Skype lessons,

  • it's got so much stuff there. So please go check it out and if you are interested in

  • supporting Eat Sleep Dream English I would be so so grateful. Thank you so much for hanging

  • out with me again guys. This is Tom, the Chief Dreamer, saying goodbye.

Eat Sleep Dreamers I know that so many of you are learning English for work and for

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A2 phrasal particle pencil copy object meeting

10 Essential Phrasal Verbs for WORK

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    Summer posted on 2020/06/08
Video vocabulary