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  • - I'm an ER nurse and I treated a patient

  • who thought he could fly and this is that story.

  • (calm music)

  • This one day I was working

  • in the one of the busiest emergency rooms in downtown LA.

  • Running around, treating my patients

  • when we had a young boy rushed in

  • from a nearby university

  • and he was admitted for a traumatic brain injury.

  • He'd finished his first year of medical school

  • and he was throwing a party.

  • The first year of medical school

  • is definitely one of the hardest

  • so it was just natural for him to celebrate his achievement.

  • He had drank alcohol and he took two 100 milligram pills

  • of MDMA, which is also known as ecstasy.

  • Mixing the alcohol with the ecstasy can heighten the effect

  • of the ecstasy and also increase the time of effect.

  • In the ER we do see a lot of patients abuse ecstasy

  • and other hallucinogenics.

  • I think a lot of nurses and doctors

  • because they see the effects of it,

  • they don't try it, they don't go near it.

  • Ecstasy can sometimes make you believe

  • that you see or hear things that are not actually there

  • and he believed that he could fly,

  • so without hesitation,

  • he jumped off a seventh floor balcony.

  • So his friends thought he was joking initially,

  • when they found out he was being serious

  • and he'd taken ecstasy and alcohol together,

  • it was too late to stop him from falling.

  • Luckily he broke his fall by hitting a tree

  • while he was coming down,

  • if that tree wasn't there, I mean,

  • he could have instantly died.

  • The tree reduced the force

  • of which is head hit the concrete.

  • He was unconscious and he had obvious signs

  • of traumatic brain injury, irregular breathing,

  • there was clear fluid that comes out of the nose and ears

  • which is cerebral spinal fluid.

  • Also he had a lot of pressure built up in his brain.

  • It can cause permanent brain damage

  • if it's not treated promptly.

  • It can cause seizure, strokes and even sometimes death.

  • In the ER everyone has to act really fast,

  • especially when we get a trauma case,

  • everyone has to be on top of it.

  • Maybe several nurses come to one patient,

  • putting in IVs, one nurse is putting in an IV,

  • one nurse is securing the airway,

  • making sure the patient's breathing.

  • (machines beeping)

  • Everything happens pretty fast in the ER.

  • Almost just like you see in the Hollywood movies.

  • The family of our patient is also our patient,

  • obviously this was a younger patient

  • so his parents were traumatized, especially his mother

  • who was initially had heard what happened

  • and thankfully they were in LA at the time

  • and she came in and she was just crying hysterically

  • and I was the first person who saw her

  • and just I held her hand and told her that, you know,

  • we were taking care of the situation,

  • we were doing as much as we can.

  • All the nurses and the doctors

  • were doing as much as they can to stabilize her son,

  • her only son, and hopefully save his life.

  • Well usually when a coma's induced,

  • it's because the brain is working so hard

  • to take care of the trauma.

  • (calming music)

  • So when that happens the brain starts to swell up

  • and it's pushing on the skull

  • and it can cause permanent damage

  • so in order to stop the brain from working so much,

  • a doctor will go in and use medication to induce coma.

  • Sometimes when patients come off a coma,

  • not only are they affected by the initial trauma

  • to the brain but they're affected by the coma

  • and the medications that they were given.

  • Some patients get out of a coma

  • and they stay in a vegetative state

  • or VS is what we call it,

  • or sometimes in a minimally conscious state

  • where they can respond to stimuli

  • but they're not doing anything else.

  • So the patient was in an induced coma for two weeks,

  • finally and thankfully, his pressure in the brain decreased

  • and his vital signs returned to normal.

  • So to my surprise when the patient awoke,

  • he didn't have any changes in his personality,

  • his mood, he didn't lose any memory,

  • he was very lucky.

  • So all the doctors and nurses worked really hard

  • to get him to where he was at the end of his stay.

  • He did come back several months later

  • to thank all the nurses that were still working there,

  • all the doctors which was so nice,

  • he brought a box of donuts.

  • He was young and he had a near death experience

  • which I'm sure changed his life forever

  • and the way he looks at life

  • and the way he treats his patient

  • because he's gonna be a doctor one day.

  • Especially as a trauma nurse I do take pride

  • in taking care of every patient,

  • even if they just come in for having a bad trip on ecstasy,

  • you know, even if it's a psychological help,

  • because we do do that a lot in the ER

  • is psychologically help patients get better.

  • It's still taking me time to kind of shut off my brain

  • after I go home from the ER or the ICU

  • and not think about the things that I saw that day.

  • Sometimes just going home and talking to my sister about it,

  • who's also a healthcare professional

  • or talking to a friend or anything

  • and just kinda letting it go

  • and you just let it go which is hard.

- I'm an ER nurse and I treated a patient

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I Saved Someone Who Jumped Off A Building

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    Summer posted on 2020/06/08
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