Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • - Assess and evaluate-

  • (camera clicks)

  • from a good friend of mine that we're gonna eventually-

  • (upbeat music)

  • Now, come and meet my pack.

  • (dogs barking)

  • Large audience today out here at the DPC at the ranch.

  • Look at all the people, everybody came.

  • We're gonna see how Andre and Sugar assess and evaluate

  • this new pitbull from a good friend of mine

  • that we're gonna eventually put into the jail system.

  • - [Men] Pawsitive Change, Pawsitive Change.

  • - That one.

  • Sounds better jail system.

  • So today is gonna be Andre's assessment and evaluation.

  • I want him to tell me where she is,

  • how she feels, and how intense.

  • Low, medium, high.

  • And if he has some kinda plan, some kinda formula

  • that he would like for us to apply,

  • I'm gonna listen to that.

  • And then of course I'm gonna ask Calvin to do the same.

  • So it's assessment, evaluation, introduction,

  • and coming up with a plan.

  • It feels like she is the Orange Is the New Black, you know.

  • One of those girls.

  • Who is she?

  • - [Andre] Piper Chapman.

  • - Piper Chapman, that's right, that's Piper Chapman.

  • Piper Chapman, you are a pitbull today.

  • - So today I'm gonna do an assessment

  • that my dad is evaluating me on.

  • So we have a pitbull that was surrendered to us,

  • because the dog was not compatible

  • with its environment at home.

  • So now we are going to rehabilitate this dog

  • and once we are done rehabilitating this dog,

  • we are going to surrender her into a good job

  • and she's going to be a working dog,

  • working with prisoners in the Pawsitive Change Program.

  • Just a little inside information,

  • I have actually been working with the dog

  • prior to this kind of little evaluation my dad's doing.

  • I work here during the week at the ranch

  • and I've kind of dipped my toes in the water,

  • just kind of hanging out with her

  • and trying to see what she's good with,

  • what she's not good with,

  • what she's uncomfortable with.

  • So I kind of already have a little head start,

  • but today I'm gonna actually jump in

  • and really get into it and kinda really see instead of,

  • you know now that I have my dad who's gonna help me

  • and assist me throughout the whole way

  • so I'm not missing any spaces.

  • So right now what I'm doing

  • is allowing her to use-

  • - [Cesar] Clap, clap, clap.

  • (clapping)

  • Clap, clap, clap, clap.

  • There you go, clap, clap, clap.

  • There you go, there you go.

  • - Surrender.

  • - [Cesar] Touch, touch, touch.

  • Nurture that.

  • Super, surrender, super sweet.

  • Super vulnerable.

  • Okay?

  • So surrender, sweet, vulnerable.

  • Why did I ask you to clap?

  • - To encourage the-

  • - [Cesar] Because she was unsure, like to get her excited,

  • so that's when you use the sound.

  • Don't use the sound if the brain is too excited

  • or is not excited.

  • Get it?

  • Too excited, don't use sound.

  • If it's not excited, don't use sound.

  • That's right.

  • Wait until the brain goes from-

  • (clapping)

  • that vibration makes it come out.

  • So you're using nose, eyes, ears

  • and bring it out.

  • So that way you don't put a leash.

  • You make the brain come out.

  • We are moving with her as fast as she's moving.

  • So you have the creativity and the openness

  • has to be a hundred percent.

  • So your mind has to be open, your creativity has to be open.

  • If you move slower.

  • This is a very important moment right there.

  • Sugar is also letting us know how she feel.

  • You can see the eyes is still a little concerned,

  • she's concerned.

  • Some people say, well she's sweet, she is vulnerable,

  • she is in a surrender state,

  • but it's still concerned.

  • And that concerned part means she's unsure.

  • So if she's unsure that means she doesn't feel safe,

  • she doesn't feel peaceful,

  • she doesn't feel completely beloved.

  • And that means she's not trusting,

  • she's not respecting,

  • she's not loving a hundred percent.

  • So if environment is not feeling safe, peaceful, and loved,

  • that's something for you to remember and to know

  • how to evaluate growth.

  • And then personal relationship, trust, respect love,

  • that's how you evaluate.

  • Before you even go to

  • walk with the dog, play with the dog,

  • explore with the dog, obeding with the dog,

  • agility with the dog, feeding the dog,

  • all of that is outside the foundation

  • of environment and connection

  • of friendship.

  • 'Cause that's what he needs to establish,

  • he needs to establish trust

  • in order for her to learn to begin to friendship.

  • 'Cause this is not about pet parent,

  • or even dog owner, or even dog trainer,

  • nothing like that.

  • Human has to establish friendship,

  • first and foremost.

  • Especially when a dog is older than three or four,

  • I think her age is around six, seven,

  • so this is a mature dog.

  • For her, this is completely new,

  • so we have to make sure that we establish friendship,

  • first and foremost.

  • That's good Andre

  • Bring her out.

  • - Bring her out?

  • - Now, this is where the leash is a big, big friend,

  • because if she chases the ducks,

  • or the dogs, or anybody that is around,

  • the leash gives you access

  • to control the body immediately.

  • Okay?

  • Versus not having a leash on the dog

  • that you don't know,

  • that you don't have trust, respect, love,

  • or rules, boundaries, limitations,

  • the leash gives you access to at least control the body.

  • - [Andre] Okay so I'm gonna pick it up,

  • and I'm gonna have the least amount of tension,

  • to let her engage in curiosity

  • and let her explore.

  • So the uncertainty and unsureness goes away.

  • - [Cesar] So what do you think?

  • Back of the pack, middle of the pack?

  • Definitely not a front of the pack.

  • - Happy go lucky.

  • - [Cesar] Middle of the pack?

  • - Yeah, middle of the pack.

  • Only because right now, she's just super unsure,

  • but once it's overcome, obstacle has been overcome,

  • she's super happy.

  • That happy like, let's go do stuff, you know?

  • I'm happy to just be here.

  • Very happy, I feel.

  • - See if you guys want to learn how to read body language,

  • why the tail is between the legs,

  • and under the leg,

  • it's not that she is afraid,

  • it's she's extremely submissive.

  • That extremely submissive is borderline,

  • you want a little bit of that.

  • You want surrender, you don't want extreme submissive,

  • 'cause that can also make other dogs attack her

  • or not want her in the pack.

  • That's why when we introduce Piper to any dog,

  • it has to be a dog that is balanced.

  • Older dogs, for any regular person to adopt

  • and bring into their home

  • can be a liability or can be a big risk,

  • because they know how to strike, okay?

  • And that's why a lot of times this breed,

  • they been thrown in the streets

  • or surrender dogs into shelters,

  • because they have strike,

  • and a strike means they have learned to correct another dog,

  • they have learned to express themselves that way.

  • We see it as a bite,

  • they see it as a communication.

  • We want that sweet face,

  • we don't want that (panting) tense face.

  • This is the kind of dog that people

  • has hit or (growls).

  • Somebody has used too much of a way

  • to letting her know to settle down.

  • That's not good.

  • See that eye contact?

  • She's sweet.

  • I mean obviously she had babies.

  • I hope you're spayed lady.

  • This is not a time when you give affection by the way.

  • This is not when you give affection.

  • - [Mesa] It's not when you give?

  • - [In Unison] Nope.

  • - Nope, this is not happy go lucky,

  • this is not sweet.

  • She's just nervous.

  • - [Mesa] How can you tell the difference between,

  • like how do you know she's nervous

  • as opposed to-

  • - I can show you Junior.

  • I can you Junior rolling over

  • and like really having fun, stretching his back,

  • versus she's just rolling over out of nervousness.

  • She's really fast and it has that

  • edge feeling, and they lick a lot.

  • I don't know if you're hearing the sounds

  • like (clicks tongue).

  • That's anxiety.

  • She's not settled, she's not relaxed.

  • She has the capability to be sweet,

  • but right now she's not.

  • Different human.

  • She doesn't know they're my kids.

  • Different approach.

  • Okay, no structure.

  • - All right, one more time?

  • - [Cesar] No, it's not the one more time.

  • It's you did it with no structure.

  • So what you're having right now,

  • is the dog that are just coming out

  • and then you put the leash on.

  • So the dog said, whoa with that human

  • I can rush to the door and he's gonna loop me in.

  • So it's no structure, you understand?

  • So if Calvin

  • repeats this way of bringing Piper out,

  • Piper will learn that she can rush to the door,

  • and the only way she can actually experience the leash

  • is because Calvin is gonna loop her.

  • You were good, I mean your skill of putting the loop in,

  • that was good,

  • but not everybody does that.

  • Remember, it's all about rituals, symbols, and formulas.

  • So this ritual,

  • it has to be where even the slowest person

  • can put the leash on her.

  • - Okay.

  • Oh, okay.

  • - So if the slowest person can put the leash

  • that means you are giving them a very patient dog.

  • - Okay.

  • - Get it?

  • - Yeah.

  • - The calmest of the calmest.

  • When you have a powerful breed,

  • the way you control power is the calmer they become.

  • So what you did right there-

  • - No control.

  • - That's right, no control.

  • Okay.