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  • This is SnowboardAddiction.com riding with Nev Lapwood, Jesse Millen and the Junkie. This

  • video exposes the techniques behind tame-dogs which are cart-wheel styled frontflips. Tamedogs

  • are a good intro to getting inverted. It's normal to be hesitant on the whole upside

  • down concept however they tend to be less intimidating then backflips. It's also a trick

  • that you can perform on small features at relatively low speed.

  • The name Tamedog developed as the opposite of a wildcat, a cartwheel-style backflip made

  • famous by the legendary wildcats crew. We show how to wildcat in our backflips tutorial.

  • The tamedog is the only popular style of frontflip. Some people also call it a nollie frontflip.Nollie:

  • A nollie is a nose ollie, the opposite of an ollie.

  • Start with a little weight over your back foot. Shift to the nose of your board causing

  • it to flex. When you feel the resistance build, spring from the nose bringing both feet up

  • and landing evenly on the centre of your board. A strong nollie is definitely one of the most

  • important aspects for doing tamedogs, as this is what pops you into the air. Make sure you're

  • really good at nollies first and are able to do them anywhere on the mountain.

  • Tripod: Practicing this tripod movement will help

  • teach you how to get flex and pop out of the nose of your board and also projects your

  • board into the motion of a tame-dog. Get low, turn to your nose, place your hands

  • on the ground and push to extend your front leg creating pop. Balance on your tail then

  • roll back to both feet. Do the same movement all in one motion and

  • feel the pop coming from your nose. The harder and quicker you push back with your front

  • foot, the more pop you'll get. See how high you can get your tail off the ground and come

  • right back down onto 2 feet.

  • Roll: From here you can take this pop and project

  • it into a roll which uses the exact same motion as a tame-dog.

  • Get low to the ground, look back and try to place your hips and back right onto the nose

  • of your board. As your body connects with the ground push back with your front leg similar

  • to the tripod motion. This will pop your board from the ground flipping it up over you. Your

  • tail should dig back into the snow on the opposite side.

  • It's important to get as low to the ground as possible. otherwise you'll fall down to

  • your body which hurts. The roll won't hurt at all if you get low enough.

  • Once you've got the movement, try it over a small jump, roller or off a cat track. It's

  • actually easier when moving just remember to get as low as possible so your body gently

  • connects to the ground with no impact. You'll most likely roll right over back to your feet

  • and ride away. This is perfect practice for the alignment

  • of your tame-dogs so don't miss this step.

  • Pool and Tramp: (pool hasn't been filmed yet) Learning frontflips off diving boards and

  • on trampolines is a great way to increase your upside down awareness and control. On

  • a tramp do some frontflips first then try cartwheel style flips like a tamedog. This

  • will introduce you to the same aerial movement. Use you head and look in the direction you

  • ride while taking off and spotting the landing.

  • Doing tamedog style flips on a trampoline or into a pool will not help you simulate

  • the feeling of nollieing into a flip however it will help you get the feeling of popping

  • up, before beginning your rotation. Pay attention to this motion as it's a common mistake to

  • throw your weight down which will ruin your pop when trying them on the snow.

  • Putting it together: Cat tracks make a firm flat surface to pop

  • from and they drop away off the side, giving you more time to bring the flip around to

  • your feet. The safest way is to learn on a powder day which will dramatically increase

  • your confidence and soften the blow of any falls as.

  • Once you've found the perfect cat track to tame-dog from, warm up by doing a bunch of

  • nollies and also try the roll motion off it. Visualize what it will feel like to nollie

  • and then front-flip. Make sure you can keep a flat base as you

  • approach. Keep a little weight on your back foot. Rock your weight forward, spring from

  • your nose and try to nollie up and out in a 45 degree direction. After a strong nollie,

  • bring your legs in compact to your body and dip your head. Your back leg comes up and

  • over performing the cart-wheel flip. It's hard to understand how this works until your

  • try it, so find a nice powdery landing where you're not gonna hurt yourself. You may fall

  • on your back or butt on your first few tries. If you get it all the way around to your feet

  • straight away then you're doing awesome. The important part is still the nollie. Normally

  • you try to bring both feet up and land evenly in the centre of your board however with a

  • tamedog you nollie out at a 45 degree angle then bring your back leg over top. It's very

  • common to nollie and flip downwards while trying to learn this which doesn't work. you

  • need to nollie up and out to get the pop required. Don't try to flip too early.

  • Alignment: While flipping it's important to keep your

  • body aligned with your board. This will help make your tame-dog smooth and stylish. It's

  • common to dip your back shoulder forward while learning which will cork it into more of a

  • frontflip and usually put you off balance. Imagine your shoulders are connected to the

  • nose and tail of your snowboard and unable to twist when performing this trick. Grabbing

  • your knees can help keep you in alignment. Side flipping on the tramp and rolls on the

  • snow will also help to smoothen out your alignment for tamedogs.

  • Landing: Spotting your landing on this trick is difficult

  • as you're learning. The flip happens very quickly and it's easy to get disorientated.

  • You can usually feel when the landing is coming. After more practice, you'll be able to see

  • the landing from start to finish by looking down throughout the flip. Practicing cart

  • wheel style-flips on the tramp will also help you to spot and stomp your landings.

  • Try to land evenly on both feet and absorb your impact. If you're landing into pow then

  • you'll need to re-position your weight to your back foot immediately after landing to

  • prevent rag-dolling.

  • Summary: Tamedogs are a fun, impressive looking trick.

  • If you're having trouble with them then work on nollies all over the mountain. It's important

  • to be able to pop up and out with confidence. The spring from your board is what makes this

  • trick happen so practice both the tripod and roll movements until you feel it pop.

  • As you get them mastered you'll be able to do them from the knuckles of park jumps or

  • off various park features. It's not a trick that you normally take to big jumps as it's

  • easy to over rotate. However you can definitely slow the flip down and go bigger as you feel

  • comfortable.

  • This is SnowboardAddiction.com riding with Nev Lapwood, Jesse Millen and the Junkie.

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This is SnowboardAddiction.com riding with Nev Lapwood, Jesse Millen and the Junkie. This

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B2 flip landing pop tame board trick

How to Front Flip on a Snowboard - (Regular) Tamedogs Trick Tip

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    Zenn posted on 2014/04/26
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