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  • - Just over a year ago,

  • I'd say my social media use was pretty typical.

  • Up until that point, I didn't place any limitations

  • or boundaries on how I used it.

  • I'd wake up looking at Instagram,

  • spend much of the day posting to Twitter,

  • and I used Facebook to see my high school classmates

  • fight over politics.

  • You know, how it was intended to be used.

  • (Matt laughing hard)

  • Then, I saw my friend Jason Zook make a post on Instagram

  • saying that he was taking the month off.

  • He was deleting social media from his phone

  • and logging out of all accounts on his computer for 30 days.

  • - [Jason] My identity entire identity was tied to who I was online

  • and I felt like if I didn't post or I wasn't there,

  • it was like, I wasn't even doing anything interesting.

  • I wasn't an interesting person.

  • It's like, that is such a messed up thought.

  • When you get to that place, you're no longer

  • in control of how you're using that platform,

  • that platform's controlling you.

  • And I was like, I have to take the power back.

  • - [Matt] Jason's post piqued my interest but I couldn't help

  • but think that he was making a huge mistake.

  • You see, Jason like myself, runs his business online

  • and relies on social media to keep that engine running.

  • I looked at what he was doing and thought,

  • oh my god, all your followers, all these people

  • that have been waiting to hear from you year after year

  • are gonna forget that you existed.

  • And I also thought, oh my god, you're also gonna miss out

  • on all these inspiration and value and connections

  • that you get through social media.

  • My reaction was similar to the first time

  • I heard about minimalism.

  • That's great for him but I would never be able to do it

  • because of, fill in the blank.

  • The excuses and rationalizations worked for a bit.

  • It would put my life's work in jeopardy, I told myself.

  • I'd stop making money.

  • I'd digitally fall off the face of the earth.

  • But then Jason quit social media, came back and well,

  • the world kept turning and his business was fine.

  • As it turns out, he's been doing it for years.

  • Twice a year, in fact.

  • - It is the most clarity of thought during those times.

  • It's like everything re-calibrates for me.

  • I get this whole refreshed creativity.

  • It's like, I was talking about re-charging those batteries.

  • I'm itching to get back to stuff by the end of 30 days

  • but I'm also really excited because it's like,

  • I've taken control of these platforms.

  • And then I can go back and go, yeah, I didn't, it's fine.

  • I did, I missed some stuff, I didn't post things

  • and guess what, everybody's still here.

  • You know, nothing really changed.

  • - It's one of those things that's so simple

  • yet we often never think about it.

  • It's like switching up a gym routine

  • that we've grown bored of

  • or ending a relationship that's toxic and negative

  • or maybe even quitting a job

  • that you've been dragging your feet to.

  • A lot of times we do things because that's the way

  • that they've always been done but the truth is

  • that is a horrible reason to do anything.

  • So, I begin to think about it some more.

  • I mean, really, how bad could it be?

  • What could really go wrong by committing to 30 days?

  • And come to think of it,

  • Instagram had really been stressing me out lately.

  • And as much as I enjoy the drama every once in a while,

  • Facebook seemed like a complete waste of time.

  • And I keep accidentally offending people on Twitter.

  • Okay, maybe intentionally.

  • I wondered how my days would change without it.

  • How much more productive I would become?

  • How much more peaceful my mornings and nights would be?

  • And then, I did it.

  • I quit social media for 30 days and I made a video about it.

  • (keyboard typing)

  • (mouse clicking)

  • There's a sense of clarity that you get

  • when you take a step away from the compulsive checking.

  • It's really hard to explain.

  • It's really impossible to quantify.

  • But I can tell you that I simply felt better

  • by being away from it (mouse clicking).

  • So, I saw a ton of benefits in that 30 day period

  • that small window when I did the social media detox.

  • But what was most surprising to me were the changes

  • that occurred after, that would be the 400 days

  • since I went on that detox until today.

  • And some of those changes still stick with me to this day.

  • To begin with, it was the first 30 day challenge

  • I completed on this channel which led me to do

  • another 11 in the year that followed.

  • As I experimented with everything from cold showers

  • to counting calories and quitting coffee,

  • that alone was a great take away.

  • To feed my curiosity for experimenting with new things

  • and pushing myself further out of my comfort zone

  • and leaning more into my own self-development

  • that had in years but I didn't realize just

  • how impactful it would be on how I used social media.

  • A lot of times we try experiments and challenges

  • and we attempt to build habits only to inevitably fall back

  • into our old patterns and routines.

  • This is probably the most frustrating thing

  • about trying to build a habit

  • yet something about quitting social media for 30 days

  • just clicked something in my head.

  • It woke me up to the problem that social media

  • had become in my own life.

  • And I realize just how much of a distraction it was,

  • how little I needed it and how little I missed it

  • once I left.

  • And so, there were changes that stuck beyond that 30 days

  • that I have continued to uphold since then.

  • First, I haven't kept any social media apps

  • on my phone consistently.

  • Instead, I install them when I wanna use them.

  • Sometimes for an hour, sometimes for a day

  • and then I delete them.

  • These days the only app that I do that with is Instagram.

  • Your self-restraint might be a little bit better than mine

  • but I personally find that I quickly

  • and compulsively default to checking Instagram

  • when it's installed on my phone.

  • The challenge you'll likely find is that

  • once you delete social media from your phone

  • you'll immediately replace it with something else.

  • Whether it's reddit, the news, a video game,

  • another distracting app, it's like whack-a-mole for apps.

  • And so, to prevent this from happening,

  • the best thing that I found to do

  • is to actually increase your distance from your phone.

  • Leave your phone in your bedroom.

  • Leave it in your car.

  • Leave it at home.

  • Whatever you do, just don't leave it on you.

  • After my social media detox,

  • I also decided to stop using Facebook.

  • I deleted my public Facebook account

  • and only use my private account for Facebook messenger

  • which I rarely use at that.

  • As much as I love sitting back

  • and watching the high school drama unfold,

  • it just wasn't worth holding onto.

  • My favorite change since I slowed down my time on social,

  • I compare myself to others much less often.

  • I'm reminded every time I login to Instagram

  • just how much that little voice in the back of my head

  • starts to talk shit.

  • That person's a better filmmaker than you.

  • Wow, they're much further along in their career than you.

  • And hey, that guy's got bigger biceps than you.

  • No matter where you're at in life,

  • it's difficult not to have these kind of thoughts.

  • And I find that that constant scrolling

  • only helped to support them.

  • On and on the voice goes.

  • Making comparisons and accusations against my worth.

  • Yes, there are ways to this voice like through meditation

  • but I find that not feeding it to begin with helps the most.

  • So, I don't.

  • And hey, side note, I think that sometimes

  • distractions are actually a good thing.

  • Sometimes we have bad days.

  • We're frustrated.

  • We just wanna go browse Netflix, click on something

  • that's gonna allow us to turn our brains off.

  • We wanna scroll through social media

  • and see what our friends are up to.

  • We just want a distraction from a shitty day

  • and I think that's completely okay.

  • I think what I'm talking about here is more so

  • when these problems become so big

  • that we start to overlook other areas of our life.

  • We're not going to the gym as much.

  • We're maybe feeling like we're in a negative spiral

  • because we keep comparing ourselves to others.

  • Now, that's where I think the changes really need to happen.

  • - [Jason] When I come back to it,

  • I then get super intentional about how I use it.

  • So, then I go, okay, I check Instagram twice a day.

  • Cause man, I would love to scroll through Instagram

  • all day long, cause it's great!

  • It's a curated feed of beautiful things.

  • It's really awesome.

  • It's really interesting.

  • But I don't want it to control my life.

  • I want the time that that's taking up

  • to be creating things of my own,

  • to be exploring, experimenting other things.

  • And so, you really do just become intentional.

  • You take that break and then you'd come back and you go,

  • I don't want that stuff anymore to happen in my life.

  • I don't wanna feel like I'm not in control

  • of my usage of these things.

  • And so, that's why these social media detoxes, man,

  • they're just been so helpful for me.

  • - Now, here's the part where I throw it back to you.

  • What if you quit social media for 30 days.

  • Don't worry the world's gonna keep turning

  • and we'll be here when you get back.

  • Thanks for watching and I'll see you next time.

- Just over a year ago,

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A2 US social jason instagram detox quitting facebook

This Completely Changed How I Use Social Media

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