Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hello, guys!

  • Piano gang! Piano gang!

  • Welcome, welcome...

  • To another episode of TwoSet Violin.

  • Featuring...

  • Recently, we did a video with Sophie where she...

  • Showed us six of her favorite piano recording or

  • performances that she thinks everyone should listen to.

  • A lot of you guys liked it...

  • And so...

  • We're doing a second follow-up episode.

  • - Yeah. - For the piano gang.

  • Sophie's prepared... Is it another six today?

  • Yes.

  • Yes. Another six...

  • Recording/performances.

  • Just to clarify, they're not in any particular order.

  • So it's not like the first six are better than these six.

  • - Yeah. - Yeah.

  • But I have to say, it's really hard to pick 12,

  • cause there are so many great pianists and...

  • It's like a personalized...

  • List. It's not like I'm gonna stick with this list

  • for the rest of my life and...

  • I think that makes it more interesting too.

  • Personalized...

  • - Yeah. - Reflect the current times...

  • And current feelings.

  • - All right. - Let's get started.

  • Sophie...

  • Okay, the first one is Daniil Trifonov.

  • Playing the Schumann Piano Concerto.

  • Yeah, I mean, I love Schumann as a composer.

  • I've played a lot of Schumann and I love the concerto.

  • I'm actually...

  • Gonna be playing next year, I think.

  • Ooo...

  • Yeah.

  • So I better start learning it, I guess.

  • But I love Daniil Trifonov.

  • He is actually one of my favorite pianists.

  • I think his playing is so delicate and and I love...

  • The way he produces sound and actually...

  • I had the opportunity to play in a master class

  • with him last year.

  • - Uh-huh. - It was the first one he has ever given.

  • - Ooo! - And I don't think he has given one ever since.

  • - Ooo! - Ooo!

  • Damn, Sophie Oui Oui! Flexing so hard right now!

  • He's so imaginative and he has so many ideas...

  • And the things he said sometimes are really crazy.

  • I played - I actually played Schumann the second Sonata

  • which the tempo marking is as fast as possible.

  • And then at the end is faster and even faster.

  • - Oh, really? - And...

  • He was talking about pedaling...

  • And he was like, yeah, you have to pedal on like

  • the third sixteenth note and the fifth sixteenth note.

  • Which is like rhythmically really odd...

  • But when he did it it was like wow,

  • it really changed...

  • The sound and it really made a difference.

  • Why do you think pianist...

  • So many pianists like love Trifonov so much?

  • For me...

  • Like when he sits on the piano, he...

  • He makes magic somehow. It's like every note...

  • Is something special.

  • And then, he's trying to create something special.

  • And I also felt that during the master class.

  • Yeah.

  • You really have to...

  • Make everything speak and sing and...

  • Yeah, make magic.

  • So the next one is...

  • Seong-Jin Cho.

  • I hope I pronounced this right.

  • With the first Etude of Chopin.

  • At the Chopin competition actually.

  • Ohh.

  • - High-pressure. - Yeah.

  • Whoa.

  • - I love it. - Dude, that was just like...

  • Wave after wave, music just kept coming.

  • Yeah, so I recently...

  • Listened to this recording because...

  • I'm playing this etude right now and I wanted to see

  • how do other people play it.

  • I really love this because

  • a lot of people they play this etude,

  • you know, like an etude.

  • Just like, every note like, hammered out.

  • But it's actually like, it's a big chorale like, the harmonies.

  • I think are really beautiful and...

  • They're more like waves up and down and

  • I thought he did that really well.

  • And also changing the articulations,

  • sometimes lighter sometimes...

  • More sometimes less.

  • - Yeah. - Yeah, he controlled that really well.

  • And he's one of my favorite young pianists right now.

  • Like I have listened to many other of his

  • Chopin interpretations and...

  • Yeah, I really like the way he plays.

  • He somehow manages to make it sound...

  • Very kind of majestic.

  • With like the kind of singing bass lines.

  • Bringing out the little leading notes even in the waves.

  • So you get this really...

  • Feeling of like this...

  • - Grandiose. - Grandiose, rather than like...

  • - Holy s***. Arpeggios, you know... - Here we go.

  • There are arpeggios, but they're not like small.

  • They're like wide...

  • Arpeggios and sometimes they're really tricky

  • because they're in between black keys and

  • really easy to miss.

  • - Cool. I like that. - Nice one.

  • Okay, next one.

  • We have something...

  • Beautiful and slow.

  • Mozart.

  • Ooo...

  • Yeah, this is Friedrich Gulda, an Austrian pianist.

  • One of the...

  • Greatest...

  • Musician genius as I find.

  • He loved Mozart, he was his favorite composer.

  • Mhm.

  • And he did a lot of jazz too. He was...

  • A little bit off-the-wall crazy person, but...

  • - He remind me of, um... - Like a genius.

  • - What's the violin guy? - Oh, oh!

  • Yeah. Yeah.

  • You know the one that plays Chaconne like... Bah-dah~

  • Yeah!

  • - Gitlis, Gitlis! - Gitlis, Gitlis!

  • - I don't know, he just gives off the same vibe, like... - Vibe, yeah.

  • Okay.

  • That's all right, let's keep going.

  • Yes, this is one of the most iconic slow movements

  • and one of my favorite moments where...

  • Basically nothing happens, but yeah.

  • Now.

  • He had to lick his lips there.

  • - He's like, that was good. That was tasty phrasing. - Yeah, I got it.

  • That was tasteful. Hahaha.

  • Did you hear that?

  • So...

  • The most simple thing in the world, it's just a cadenza.

  • Or you know just these single notes.

  • Yeah.

  • But it's like...

  • Everything there... I don't know.

  • A lot of pianists they like to...

  • You know, put runs in between

  • which I personally don't like so much...

  • Cause I like it when it's just the pure...

  • Just what Mozart wrote, you know.

  • And that's also quite hard to do.

  • Because, again like, piano you can't sustain notes.

  • So the fact that it's a single note that...

  • Goes for so long...

  • The relationship of the volume of each note

  • has to be just right.

  • - So it sounds like a phrase. - Bam~

  • Rather than...

  • A bunch of single notes, right?

  • What's that quote by like Einstein? Like...

  • Any fool can make things more complicated.

  • - It takes a genius to simplify or something like that. - To simplify, yeah.

  • Unfortunately, never could hear him live cause he died.

  • But I work with his son Paul Gulda a lot. He's...

  • Here in Vienna and he is also an amazing pianist.

  • I love how...

  • You've been choosing excerpts that's so different.

  • And each one...

  • I feel like can...

  • Showcase to both the piano gang,

  • but also non-piano gang people out there.

  • And soon-to-be piano gang.

  • Just how...

  • Versatile and rich the repertoire is for piano.

  • You guys have the best repertoire, I gotta say.

  • I get kind of jealous.

  • Yeah, but it's too much.

  • Yeah.

  • - That's true, you guys have too many notes to learn. - You can't play everything.

  • That's true.

  • But that's also good,

  • so not everyone's always playing the same piece.

  • Anyway, let's keep going.

  • - Oh, I love Prokofiev. - Ooo.

  • Yeah, me too.

  • - Did she... - She just went woah with her hand.

  • Did she use uh...

  • - Like... - She used her knuckle, hey.

  • - Dude... - Dude, that got really intense.

  • I don't know, wouldn't that hurt?

  • Maybe...

  • It's hard to tell.

  • Or maybe because it's so loose that it looks like it.

  • I love about her playing that she's so loose, you know.

  • And there's just so much power, it's just like...

  • Dude, she's so young in here too.

  • Yeah, it's 1977, I think.

  • - Woah... - With Previn.

  • But I love her interpretations of Prokofiev concertos.

  • And I love Prokofiev as well.

  • I mean, I've always liked Prokofiev, but I feel like now...

  • Once I started playing more Prokofiev,

  • I really love his music, it's so fun to listen to.

  • Yeah.

  • I loved it.

  • I was - I was feeling the vibe.

  • Yeah.

  • She had a good energy, yeah.

  • What do you think about Argerich as a player?

  • I'm just curious.

  • I really lover her playing, I mean,

  • especially Prokofiev I think.

  • But I do respect her a lot.

  • She actually once came to our university

  • to talk a little bit.

  • She didn't play anything for us, but...

  • But it was really interesting what she had to say...

  • About her life and...

  • To me, like as a...

  • Outsider because my sister's a pianist

  • and she loved Argerich.

  • - In my mind, she's like the Beyonce of the piano world. - Yeah, she's like the...

  • - Queen. Yeah. - Just like the queen.

  • - The queen of. - Yeah, that's true.

  • True, yeah.

  • Oh and fun fact, actually she was...

  • One of the only students of Friedrich Gulda,

  • the one we heard right before her.

  • - Oh! - Really?

  • Okay, this next one Michelangeli..

  • With Chopin Mazurka.

  • Nice.

  • What do you think, why did you pick this one?

  • Well, Michelangeli is...

  • For insiders, he's really well known.

  • Have you guys ever heard of him?

  • - Uh... - For non-pianists...

  • - We're outsiders. - We're outsiders now,

  • it's gone beyond our scope of knowledge.

  • I really like his interpretation of mazurkas.

  • Cause mazurkas somehow, my teacher told me...

  • They're sort of the king discipline of Chopin.

  • Like it's basically harder to play mazurka well than

  • an etude or a concerto

  • - or all these hard things. - Really?

  • Why?

  • It's so simple, but it's so hard.

  • It's a little bit like Mozart.

  • I thought like, "really?"

  • But then I learned some and it's true.