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  • the Italian government has asked its citizens to stay at home in an attempt to slow the spread of Corona virus.

  • We've got the language you need to talk about this story.

  • I'm Georgina.

  • I'm Catherine on Let's hear more about this story from this BBC Radio One news bulletin.

  • The latest government advice is, Don't travel to Italy unless you have to.

  • Public gatherings in the country have been banned, and people that have been told to stay near their home unless it's an emergency.

  • Yes, so the Italian government has asked all of everyone to stay near their homes and only travel unless it's an emergency.

  • All public gatherings have bean band that includes any football matches that includes nightclubs as well.

  • I believe these are drastic measures in the UK The British government has a suggested that people do not travel to Italy unless it is an emergency.

  • Yeah, so big news, big news.

  • It's a pretty serious situation over there.

  • If you're watching or listening from Italy, we do hope that you're safe.

  • So you've bean looking at the news headlines around these stories, and you picked out three with interesting language that we're going to talk about today I have.

  • So we've got locked down Quarantine on dhe self isolates, lock down quarantine and self isolate.

  • So comical to your first headline, please.

  • We certainly can.

  • So the first headline is from a the BBC News Websites.

  • So that's a UK best based website and is Italy wakes to first day in lock down lock down emergency situation where movement is restricted.

  • So what can you tell us about lock down?

  • Well, our first fall are telling the spelling, So it's L o c k D o W n on dhe.

  • It's basically made up of two words.

  • Two words.

  • Two words.

  • Yes, Locking down.

  • Are they locking down?

  • Yes.

  • So the first word is lock.

  • So a lock is something that you put a key into to prevent somebody from entering a room.

  • You want it to remain locked or to stop people leaving a room as well.

  • On the other word is down and that's the opposite of up.

  • So we got up pointing upwards and down, pointing down for those that are just listening.

  • Eso Catherine?

  • Yes.

  • Do you like to lock any rooms?

  • And you're well, I do like to look like that to lock the bathroom.

  • Usually, when I'm using that, I think it's really important to lock the bathroom door when you've been there.

  • Sometimes I like Thio for a bit of privacy and might lock lock the bedroom door when I want some me time.

  • Yeah, but that's not locked down.

  • So it's I'm choosing to do it.

  • Yes.

  • You choose that.

  • You actually have chosen Thio.

  • Turn the key to lock yourself to lock people out or to lock yourself in, However you want to look at it.

  • But the term locked down actually means that somebody else an external body is preventing you from leaving an area, in this case to stop the spread of the Corona virus.

  • So the Italians are being prevented from moving freely.

  • Okay, so again, it's quite it's reflecting the seriousness of the situation.

  • Yes, it So it is it always a kind of got a negative idea of restriction of movement on?

  • No, you way have people user in a jokey fashion.

  • So yeah, I was doing an essay one time, and I decided I wasn't gonna talkto anybody.

  • I was taking no phone calls, Nothing.

  • I said to everybody I'm writing my assignment.

  • I'm on lock down.

  • Yeah, and that's a very good example of how you can use it.

  • We must stress this is done in a jokey fashion because obviously you're not seriously locking yourself language we call but on.

  • We must also stress that normally is used in a negative context on about quite serious situations.

  • So it's when ah, situation through government or an authority of body decide that it is better for people to not move freely because there is a certain on emergency situation now.

  • Propositions.

  • Georgina, what can you tell us about laws?

  • Well, it's often used within.

  • So an example would be the street was in lock down after the gas explosion, so that's in lock down.

  • And it's weird to be, isn't it to be in lock down?

  • Yes, exactly on.

  • But it could also You can also use the proposition on so you could say the building was on lock down following the security beach breach, I should say on dhe it can also be a phrase or verb to lock down the same meaning s o.

  • The building was locked down following the security breach.

  • Super Well, I think we've done.

  • We've done plenty or not one.

  • So let us go to a slide.

  • So can we have your next headline, please?

  • We certainly can.

  • So the next headline is from Northern Ireland, from Belfast on It's from Belfast Telegraph Digital on it is Corona virus.

  • Italy implements nationwide quarantine measures quarantine a situation where living things are separated in order to stop the spread of disease quite along Where that quarantine Where success.

  • The stress is on the first syllable.

  • So quarantine, quarantine, yes.

  • Quarantine.

  • Yeah, I often have to use my hand quarantine quarantine.

  • So yet the stresses on the first syllable on it's spelt q u a r a N t i n e as Catherine?

  • Yes.

  • Have you lived in any other countries?

  • Apart from the UK, I've lived in several other countries apart from the UK And have you ever had a pet dog or cat whilst you lived in those?

  • Well, I've heard.

  • Let's say I've got it.

  • I had an imaginary pet dog.

  • He's actually for the purposes of today.

  • I had a dog.

  • Yes.

  • Okay, good.

  • What kind of dog was it?

  • A little stray One.

  • Okay, I found it.

  • on the street, but it was very, very cute, and it had one ear pointing up on one, pointing down.

  • That's a very lovely picture now when you decided to bring back this imaginary dog to this real dog for the purposes of today, yes, what did what procedures did you have to do?

  • Well, it was quite complicated.

  • There was a lot of paperwork, and I came back to the UK and the dog came on a separate flight, and when the dog came, I went home.

  • But the dog had to stay in a special kind of little zoo near the airport, and it had to stay there for six months.

  • It had lots of medical tests, and after six months they decided that it didn't have any diseases.

  • So then I was allowed to take it home.

  • Yes, so that's what's really important about this word.

  • Quarantine.

  • It doesn't actually mean that you have anything any diseases.

  • It's just a precautionary measure.

  • So in this case, Katherine's dog was kept isolated or apart from other animals and humans just to double check that the dog didn't have any dangerous diseases.

  • So so that's really important to remember is quarantined a noun or a verb.

  • In this contest, it's being used as a noun, but it can also be a verb on if it's being used as a verb.

  • It's often used in the passive tense, so that means that somebody else is implements it onto you.

  • So, for example, at the moment you might say people are being quarantined because of the Corona virus.

  • So I can say my dog was quarantine.

  • Your dog was quarantined, and if I want to say it is A is a known how do I say that s O.

  • It's often used with them in.

  • So my dog had to go and into quarantine, so I should have said into, But it can also be used within.

  • So I was in quarantine after I visited on infected area, and I noticed the verb was to go into quarantine.

  • Yes, so you got to go into quarantine and to be in quarantine.

  • I'm put you can put someone into quarantine, and you certainly can.

  • So if, for example, if the doctors felt that someone may have being exposed to a disease, they may get put into a quarantine on the docks of the person.

  • Yeah, thank you very much.

  • Shall we have a look at that honest slide way?

  • So we have covered viruses on diseases in the past.

  • In this program fairly recently, we had a better news story about the disease.

  • Ebola didn't way.

  • We did.

  • It was called a bola is curable.

  • 90% success in clinical trials.

  • So if you want to watch this news review, just click on the link below.

  • This is news of you from BBC Learning English.

  • Let's have your final headline, Georgina.

  • So the final headline is from another UK online newspaper and is at the Telegraph.

  • The headline is Southern Italy tells panicking Northerners they must self isolate if fleeing Corona virus red zones self isolate.

  • Keep yourself away from other people.

  • Now we've got a two part word again having way we have.

  • It's a verb in this case, and it's spelt s e l f hyphen.

  • I s o l a t e.

  • So it's made up of two words.

  • The first word is the perfect self on DDE.

  • That means to it's something that you do to you.

  • So, for example, I self educated yourself educated Well, that's amazing.

  • But imagine if I did.

  • And if I did self educate, it would mean that I taught myself without a teacher.

  • Okay, so you teach yourself with no teacher, you self educate.

  • Yes, And another example would be I have a self wind watch.

  • So to self wind, that means that I don't need to do anything.

  • I don't need to wind it up.

  • I don't need to do anything.

  • It just keeps going without any input from you.

  • So you don't have to turn that little button on the side of a watch.

  • No, I don't have to do any of that.

  • All I have to do is read the time.

  • It's amazing.

  • Fantastic.

  • Yeah.

  • Okay, so that's self.

  • What about isolate?

  • So isolate means to keep apart from others.

  • So if you imagine on isolated house, I mean, that's the adjective, but it would mean a house in the middle of nowhere, with nothing around it.

  • So alone, Yes.

  • No neighbors, nothing around it.

  • So that was making me think.

  • Self isolate.

  • So what are we go?

  • So when we combine the words together itself, I to isolate implies that you have decided to keep yourself apart from other people.

  • So you literally isolate yourself?

  • Yes, and it implies that it is voluntary.

  • Yes, the word self is the clue that, yes, so is that different to something like quarantine then?

  • Yes.

  • In that case, it is because quarantine implies that it is something that an external authority to 40 has implemented on a group of people or an area Where's self isolate implies it's something that's being done voluntarily.

  • Okay, but in the headline We've got the word most haven't way.

  • Yes, So that basically must is Ah, a motor verb of obligation.

  • So whilst is voluntary.

  • I would say that in the headline there basically stating that it is that they're strongly suggesting that people in the government says you must sell Faisaly.

  • Yes, yes, lovely.

  • And, um, is think that's a good all we need to say about that word.

  • So let's have a look at a slide time for a vocabulary.

  • Recap.

  • Yes, so we have the 1st 1 we have is locked down.

  • That means emergency situation where movement is restricted.

  • The next word we have is quarantine situation where living things are separated to stop the spread of disease on the final word is self isolate.

  • Keep yourself away from other people.

  • Great.

  • Now there's more about this on lots of other topics on our website BBC learning english dot com We're also all over Social Media on will be back in the news reviews studio next week.

  • So do join us.

  • Thank you for watching goodbye.

  • Bye.

the Italian government has asked its citizens to stay at home in an attempt to slow the spread of Corona virus.

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Coronavirus: Italy takes action: BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/04/04
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