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  • Hilah: Go Superbowl. Hey everybody. Welcome to Hilah Cooking. I'm

  • Hilah. I'm very happy to announce that we are coming up on our year

  • anniversary of the show. To celebrate that fact, we're going to be

  • bringing on a lot of special guests this month. Today, I have a very

  • special friend that came all the way from Houston, and she's going to

  • show us how to make chicken wings for your Superbowl party. May I

  • introduce Jenny Kelly from 'I Love Flavor'. Say hi.

  • Jenny: Hi.

  • Hilah: Hi. What is it about your chicken wings that makes them so

  • special?

  • Jenny: They are super-super-spicy.

  • Hilah: Awesome, I love spicy.

  • Jenny: Me too.

  • Hilah: You love spicy.

  • Jenny: I do.

  • Hilah: This is terrific, Texas spice. The Longhorns are not in the

  • Superbowl.

  • Jenny: Sadly, no.

  • Hilah: Sorry. The first thing we're going to do is rub the chicken

  • wings with some spices. You want to tell us about that?

  • Jenny: Yeah. First, we're going to just take the chicken wings and

  • then we're going to put a ranch dip in it. I know it sounds weird, but

  • it tastes amazing.

  • Hilah: I bet.

  • Jenny: Then the adobo seasoning, which is just a bunch of garlic and a

  • bunch of spices put together. Really nice.

  • Hilah: I got . . . you can buy whole chicken wings, but I got the ones

  • that are wing portions, so they're already cut up into bite-size

  • pieces. Let's tear into this baby. Let's see. Oh, my God. I'm really

  • strong. This is a little over 2 pounds, which is a pretty typical

  • package size. I'll let you put the seasonings on since your hands

  • aren't covered in chicken yet. Season them up, Jenny.

  • Jenny: First we're going to take the adobo seasoning and just . . .

  • you don't have to season it too much, or you don't want to get too

  • salty. You pretty much just shake it.

  • Hilah: Just a nice even coating.

  • Jenny: You don't have to measure, you just lightly do it. That's the

  • great thing. That's fun.

  • Hilah: It'll be good, no matter what.

  • Jenny: Some awesome goodness. Then the best part, the ranch dip. Who

  • doesn't love ranch? I love this stuff. I think I had this lying around

  • the house one day, and I'm like, "This sounds good."

  • Hilah: You put ranch on them anyway, so totally.

  • Jenny: You just shake it over. You don't have to, you could just blop

  • it in. Looks fancy.

  • Hilah: Chicken's good. Then we just . . .

  • Jenny: Dig right in.

  • Hilah: We washed our hands with germs. Just kidding. It smells good.

  • This is the best-smelling raw chicken I've ever smelled.

  • Jenny: I know. It's good. I swear it's that ranch.

  • Hilah: These are coated, as are our fingertips. Jenny, you said you

  • could let them rest overnight in the fridge if you want, but who has

  • time for that?

  • Jenny: I'm too lazy for that, but you can.

  • Hilah: It's an option. We're just going to let them rest like this

  • while we heat up some oil for frying, and also wash our paws. We're

  • going to heat up some oil, now that we have cleaned ourselves. We just

  • heat it up over high?

  • Jenny: It's usually high, medium-high, depending on your stovetop.

  • Hilah: I like to cook on high . . .

  • Jenny: We can do that.

  • Hilah: . . . because I like things to be done fast.

  • Jenny: Let's do it hot.

  • Hilah: How deep . . . sunnova. How deep oil do we need?

  • Jenny: I usually do it a couple inches.

  • Hilah: It's a terrible question.

  • Jenny: Probably about 2 inches, because you want it to cover the

  • chicken entirely, that way you don't have to flip it over as much,

  • takes a lot less time.

  • Hilah: It cooks up the sides and everything.

  • Jenny: Usually about 32 ounces, 48 ounces, depending on your pot. It

  • works.

  • Hilah: That looks like maybe just under an inch.

  • Jenny: Probably 2 inches would be good. That's perfect.

  • Hilah: Awesome. Jenny says perfect. While we're waiting for that to

  • heat up, why don't you tell us a little about how you got started with

  • your show and what you're doing with it.

  • Jenny: One day . . . I love cooking. I always loved cooking. I love to

  • cook with flavor, make it easy. Lots of my friends don't know how to

  • cook.

  • Hilah: Me too.

  • Jenny: They're like, "You need to get on YouTube. You need to do

  • something so we can actually learn how to cook." I'm like, "OK."

  • Pretty much bought a video camera that day, bought all the stuff, and

  • started playing around on camera.

  • Hilah: Just learn as you go.

  • Jenny: Yeah. It's fun.

  • Hilah: You definitely look like you're having fun in the videos.

  • Jenny: I have a lot of fun, but it's all food. It's good. It's all

  • about the food. I want to focus on flavor, easy cooking, and just

  • having fun.

  • Hilah: Cooking should be fun.

  • Jenny: I know.

  • Hilah: I think people get hung up on it and they're like, "It's so

  • hard."

  • Jenny: It shouldn't be a chore.

  • Hilah: Exactly.

  • Jenny: I taught myself how to cook. My parents did not cook, ever.

  • Hilah: How old were you when you started cooking?

  • Jenny: I think 12-13; I stared at Food Network for hours, day and

  • night, because I didn't even know how to do anything. I knew how to

  • make myself a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, but whenever it came

  • to even chicken or anything like macaroni and cheese . . .

  • Hilah: Nothing? Wow.

  • Jenny: It was fun.

  • Hilah: Did you cook dinner for your family?

  • Jenny: I did. I failed a lot. I screwed stuff up.

  • Hilah: We all fail sometimes.

  • Jenny: It's a learning curve. I started to cook dinners for my family,

  • and now I'm the person who makes Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner.

  • Hilah: Awesome.

  • Jenny: It was a little intimidating at first, but they love it. I'm

  • the family favorite at the moment because I can cook.

  • Hilah: Congratulations, you've made it.

  • Jenny: Kind of. Baby steps. It tastes good, so as long as the food

  • tastes good. It works. It's fun.

  • Hilah: Cool. Maybe we should . . . do you want to check the oil?

  • Jenny: What I do is just as . . . I don't leave the oil for long

  • periods of time because I'm still learning; I don't know exactly the

  • timing. The way you watch the oil turn into hot, you either can stick

  • the wooden spoon in, and then you stick it right in. If it starts to

  • bubble, that means it's hot enough.

  • Hilah: Cool, that's a good trick.

  • Jenny: Definitely.

  • Hilah: Tell me if this looks good.

  • Jenny: You can just ease it on in.

  • Hilah: It's totally happening.

  • Jenny: That's perfect. That's good.

  • Hilah: Now we'll just put them all in.

  • Jenny: Make sure you ease it on in so that you don't burn yourself,

  • since it is hot oil. I have burned myself so many times.

  • Hilah: I know.

  • Jenny: You really won't burn yourself if you just ease it on in. I

  • just was impatient, and just was like 'chicken.'

  • Hilah: Throw them all in at once [inaudible: 06:52] explosion.

  • Jenny: You can squish them all in, they can touch. After a couple of

  • minutes of cooking, we just shake them up a little bit and make sure

  • they don't stick to the bottom. They're really good to go.

  • Hilah: Using a really deep pot like this helps prevent splatters too,

  • like you were saying. I'm stirring them; is that OK?

  • Jenny: Yeah, it is.

  • Hilah: I just started doing it.

  • Jenny: After I usually put them in the pot, I immediately stir it up

  • so they don't stick together. After that, you just watch it off and

  • on. [inaudible: 07:23] We can also put the hot oil pan cover on it

  • too, if you're worried about splatter. There you go. The cool thing

  • about that is it keeps your counter clean. I hate to clean, I do.

  • Hilah: You have to do it.

  • Jenny: It's just something . . .

  • Hilah: It's a chore. These will cook . . .

  • Jenny: About 20-25 minutes, depending. It usually takes me about 25

  • minutes. Not too long.

  • Hilah: No. We got to make a sauce, so that's the perfect thing to do .

  • . .

  • Jenny: There you go.

  • Hilah: . . . while this is cooking. I'm going to actually move this to

  • the back burner so we can use the front.

  • Jenny: We can do that.

  • Hilah: Now we're going to put the sauce together while those continue

  • to fry. What have we got here?

  • Jenny: We got some Hooter's sauce. Any wing sauce will be good, but

  • Hooter's is always good. We're just going to spice up some Hooter's

  • sauce.

  • Hilah: Sounds easy. We trust Hooter's. They know about wings.

  • Jenny: They do, and it's good.

  • Hilah: A cup of this?

  • Jenny: I do just over a cup, so you don't have to do the whole thing.

  • It just works out to be just enough.

  • Hilah: That looks like about a cup.

  • Jenny: That was perfect.

  • Hilah: What we going to spice it with?

  • Jenny: First, we're going to sweeten it up a little bit with some dark

  • brown sugar.

  • Hilah: Nice.

  • Jenny: Make it . . . if you like them extra hot and extra spicy, you

  • don't have to do the dark brown sugar. That's the sweet element.

  • Hilah: They're still spicy; it's just there's going to be a nice

  • balance.

  • Jenny: It's definitely going to be spicy, but you'll be able to enjoy

  • your wings a little bit better. You'll have taste buds by the end of

  • it. I just used 1/2 cup. I do the old-fashioned, just pour it all in.

  • Hilah: Eyeball it.

  • Jenny: Eyeball it method. 1/2 cup is always good. Then we get the fun

  • stuff, just Worcestershire sauce. I just do about a teaspoon of this,

  • which is just about a couple of blobs just all around. That's a good

  • bottom layer element to it.

  • Hilah: A little depth.

  • Jenny: Who doesn't love garlic? I'm a little obsessed. I just shake it

  • all in.

  • Hilah: You like shaking stuff.

  • Jenny: I do. It's fun. About a teaspoon, or if you're real excited and

  • you love garlic, and you want more garlicky wings, do a tablespoon.

  • Hilah: This is totally . . . obviously, you can make this however you

  • like. This is how you like it.

  • Jenny: It's how I like it. Some people don't like garlic, so you don't

  • have to add it. All of these . . .

  • Hilah: Those people are crazy.

  • Jenny: I know, they're crazy. Onion powder, which is always good.

  • Again, the same . . . I usually do the same amount of onion powder as

  • I do garlic powder, so a teaspoon or tablespoon, and then just a

  • little bit of pepper. Why not?

  • Hilah: Pepper's good.

  • Jenny: It's in the kitchen. I usually do about 5 grates. You can do a

  • pinch or 2 pinches. This is some old-fashioned measuring right now.

  • Paprika, I just do a pinch or so. This is just adding a little bit

  • more spiciness to it.

  • Hilah: Some color, too.

  • Jenny: It makes it fun. I know a lot of people don't have these

  • spices, so they don't really have to add all of them, but it just

  • kicks up your sauce [inaudible: 10:41].

  • Hilah: Just add whichever ones you happen to have around.

  • Jenny: Definitely. That's what I did. I just one day . . . that's how

  • I created this sauce. I'm like, "I love Hooter's sauce, but I want to

  • [inaudible: 10:50]." I went to my pantry and grabbed all the spices,

  • and just like, "Let's have a taste test." It was fun.

  • Hilah: The best things are invented that way.

  • Jenny: That's right. It's always good. This is cayenne red pepper,

  • which is also fun and spicy.

  • Hilah: Fun equals spicy in this case.

  • Jenny: This is pretty cool; this is a blend of black and red pepper,

  • but it's called Hot Shot. I saw the name to be honest with you, and

  • I'm like, "I have to try this."

  • Hilah: The marketing worked.

  • Jenny: It did. This is . . . if you want to make something super-

  • spicy, it's fun.

  • Hilah: I just want to try it.

  • Jenny: Try it. It's good. It has a little kick.

  • Hilah: It's just peppers. There's no salt in it? Nice.

  • Jenny: I don't think so.

  • Hilah: There's not.

  • Jenny: The cool thing is we're not really adding any salt. I know

  • there is some salt in some of this stuff, but not much. You just

  • season it up a little bit. That's really it. All you're going to do is

  • heat it up and simmer it.

  • Hilah: Just simmer it. The brown sugar is making it turn a really rich

  • color. That's pretty. I'm just trying to break up the lumps, and then

  • we'll turn it down to simmer and let it integrate. We're just going by

  • the color on these, right?

  • Jenny: Yeah. What I do is I like them extra-crispy. It's that dark

  • brown, not really burnt, but really close to being burnt look to it.