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  • Do you have trouble committing? In this episode

  • of GitHub Foundations, we're gonna look at three different ways

  • to make a commit in Git.

  • [GitHub & Git Foundations]

  • ♪(easy listening music)♪

  • [Commit]

  • Hi, I'm Tim Berglund. The whole point of using

  • a source control system is to keep track of changes. In Git,

  • these are called commits. Here, we're gonna look at three

  • different ways to make a commit.

  • [Commit: Command Line]

  • We'll start at our local computer, down at the command line.

  • Now suppose you've already got a project that you've started on.

  • It doesn't matter what the language or platform is, just as long as

  • it's text files arranged in directories. Now you're gonna

  • use a text editor to make a change to one of those files,

  • or maybe you'll change a few at once. The "git status" command

  • is gonna tell you about what files might need to be committed.

  • It's gonna tell you about files that have changed, or maybe

  • new files that you've added since the last commit.

  • To take those changes and get them ready to be committed,

  • use the "git add" command. This puts them in a special

  • holding tank called the staging area. You can see that they've

  • moved to the staging area by using the "status" command

  • again, and notice that the output looks different.

  • Every time you commit a change, it has to go through

  • the staging area. This is a key part of Git's architecture.

  • It can seem strange at first, but the more you use Git,

  • the more sense it will make. To complete the process,

  • use the "git commit" command. Be sure to include a nice

  • descriptive message so that other people can understand

  • what this commit is all about. If you don't include a message,

  • Git will actually open a text editor and make you enter one.

  • It's not gonna let you get away with making a commit

  • without describing it. You should notice this: if you were to

  • edit that same file a second time, you'd actually use the "git add"

  • command again before committing it, and then,

  • with the file stage, you'd use the "git commit" command again

  • to take another snapshot of your changes. In a real project,

  • a lot of the time, you'll change many files at once.

  • The staging area gives you the flexibility to decide

  • what changes become a part of what commit. And as you

  • get more and more comfortable using Git, you're gonna

  • start to pay attention to the way you craft commits.

  • Each one should be a coherent story that makes sense

  • to another person looking at your history. It's not just

  • a jumble of changes that you happen to have made since

  • the last time you've committed. Don't worry if this

  • doesn't make sense yet. It'll start to make a lot more sense

  • as use Git more and more together

  • with other people.

  • [Commit: GitHub.com]

  • Now, what if you've already got a project up on GitHub.com?

  • Well, you can make commits there too. Click on the file

  • you want to edit, and then click the "edit" button

  • in the browser. You'll get a simple text editor where

  • you can make changes to your file. When you submit

  • those changes, GitHub will create a new commit containing

  • just the changes to that file. Doing it this way, you don't have

  • quite as much control over what goes into each commit,

  • but it's a lot easier to do for people who aren't comfortable

  • using the command line, and for making really simple

  • changes to text files.

  • [Commit: GitHub for Mac / Windows]

  • Finally, maybe back on your computer, you can commit code

  • using GitHub for Desktop. This still makes a commit locally

  • on your computer, but without forcing you to use

  • the command line. You edit your files with a text editor

  • the way you normally would, but now, GitHub for Desktop,

  • and I'm showing you the Mac version here, will let you select

  • which files you want to stage and then commit.

  • You can easily select the files you want to be in the commit

  • and type in the message, and GitHub for Desktop handles

  • the add and the commit for you. This is another great way

  • to go if you want to steer clear of the command line for

  • everyday operations. Commits are the cornerstone of collaboration

  • with Git and GitHub. In future episodes, we'll look at how

  • to examine the commits you have locally, and, the best part,

  • how to share them with other people.

  • [Thanks for watching.]

  • Thanks for watching this episode of GitHub Foundations

  • on how to commit. If you like this, subscribe

  • to the GitHub Guides channel here. If you want to see

  • other things we've got going on with videos at GitHub,

  • check out our other channels down here.

  • As always, we would love if you left us a comment or

  • a question down here, and if you want to see more

  • training videos, just click on one of these guys

  • down here; we got them ready for you.

Do you have trouble committing? In this episode

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A2 commit git github commits command line text editor

Commit • GitHub & Git Foundations

  • 34 3
    Mickey Fly posted on 2014/04/06
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