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  • no.

  • Once upon a time, it was a dark and stormy night, but it was all a dream.

  • The end?

  • No, it is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife, or perhaps slightly less famously.

  • It is a truth universally recognized that a zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains.

  • A world without stories, no silver screen, no flat screen telly, no box sets, no Netflix, no binge watch till I can't move.

  • It's almost impossible to imagine, isn't it?

  • And that's because we are all taught how to understand, interpret, appreciate until stories a k a.

  • English literature.

  • Put your hand up if you have an English teacher at school.

  • Okay, keep your hand up if a inspired you wave your hand in the air if you never told them.

  • Humble English teacher on song Hero in her memoir, wants in a House on fire Andrea Ashworth rights of two teachers, one through whom she became enchanted by the memorable bits of literature that Boyd her while circumstances were sinking on another who radiated a crucial sense of possibility and cast a benign, probably lifesaving spell on her life.

  • That life saving spell is far from unique.

  • This talk is a call to action toe all those studying English, teaching English, thinking about teaching it or who know of anyone who might be interested in this most beautiful and important of subjects.

  • In recent times, I have seen the core subjects that I've dedicated my life to become endangered.

  • Students aren't taking English students that G.

  • C.

  • S C are finding it boring.

  • The finding stories boring English in schools has been described as a joyless slog, and that's just by the teachers.

  • Students are not selecting it, a level not choosing to study it at university.

  • We need to do something stories of central to what make us human.

  • They're crucial for the skills of connection, communication and compassion.

  • In a nutshell, Stories help us understand ourselves and each other.

  • When I was growing up in a small town, I didn't know anything about the world, but I read I watched I listen to stories about the lives of others, and they gave me a tiny glimmer of understanding, a glimpse, a minute crack of empathy opening in my mind to let the light in on differences so they couldn't sit in the darkness of ignorance.

  • And stories aren't just what's written down in words.

  • Maps could tell a story.

  • Drawings to drama, dance, movement, meditation can all tell stories.

  • We all have at least one important story inside of us that really should be told.

  • Just a retold is an alternative way to teach English.

  • This is an eye dent that was drawn by Simon Gran in one of the shooters on the module.

  • Simon has tried to capture the spirit of inclusivity through the people as well as bringing together Chester old and new with the buildings, just to be told, literally brings students and members of the Chester community together to create links on better understanding between these two groups.

  • Bell Hooks a CZ is those teachers who transgressed traditional boundaries who have the most potential to inspire, and Chester retold, crosses boundaries in every sense.

  • What happens in its classroom, who is welcomed there on where that classroom is even situated?

  • Remember, anywhere could be a classroom, anything a lesson.

  • This picture was taken last year in the mirrors Outside story house.

  • You can just about make out Me in the middle on those around me are all my students on the course, Chester Retold teaches English teachers stories using compassion.

  • It offers English undergraduates at the University of Chester the opportunity to learn about storytelling alongside participants from the community of jester.

  • Over the past two years, my undergraduates have lint from on beside community students from Fallen Angels Dance Theater, a charity helping people recover from addiction and mental health problems through movement and dance.

  • And they have also engaged with live Cheshire, who worked to include young people with physical Onda or learning disabilities, some of whom were in the earlier photo taken outside story house.

  • I took this picture at Live Cheshire's base.

  • That new scene Chester, it reads.

  • Life isn't about waiting for the storm to be over.

  • It's about learning to dance in the rain, a statement to live by and the statement that also in calculates the mood of optimism on the course as well as the possibility of doing something creative with negativity.

  • The Chester retold model boosts engagement through placing the facilitation of belonging.

  • Acceptance and inclusion at its core on its techniques are also really quirky achieving engagement through inclusion.

  • This is the beginning of our walk around the city walls.

  • I took pictures of the students on the people that we met along the way.

  • It was a very mindful activity, and we were encouraged to experience it through all of our different senses, especially if we've done the walk many times before.

  • The walk led to a discussion about homelessness and then later a story about it to via this map we drew where we walked figuratively and noted what we saw, felt or sensed a different points along the way.

  • This is an example of how a map comptel a story on.

  • There were other edge of the seat activities, too, including a flash mob set to Johnny B.

  • Goode in the story house foyer.

  • Because Chester retold is very much a course about learning by doing learning by doing is really powerful.

  • This is off students and staff engaging with a memory line inspired by the poet limbs.

  • To say it's a washing line with lots of different memory prompts on it.

  • Learning by doing begins with connection.

  • I'd like us to try it now, so bear with me if you are able to stand.

  • I would like you to stand up now.

  • If you're not able to stand, remain seated.

  • Okay.

  • Thank you.

  • Whether you are seated or standing, I would now like you to high five the person next to you.

  • Go on.

  • We're all in it together.

  • Do it again.

  • Maybe the person on the other side now and again.

  • I would like you to feel in your body.

  • Keep high fiving.

  • Come on.

  • Okay.

  • Excellent.

  • Excellent.

  • A star.

  • You can sit down now as well as demonstrably all mental health benefits.

  • The course also achieves excellent academic results on outstanding student feedback, for example, students have said it has been the most enjoyable module A university so far.

  • This module is a breath of fresh air.

  • In terms of assessment, I've learned that I can take my experiences, even negatives on do something expressive and beautiful and positive with them and from the community students.

  • The best thing was interacting with fabulous young hearts and brains.

  • A renewed sense of the enjoyment and fulfillment of learning.

  • The people were probably the best thing.

  • The students were bright and lively.

  • It was a joy.

  • The connection Israel, the compassion genuine to demonstrate.

  • I'm going to read a piece one of my students need, Ryan, a talented poet, wrote for a community student from live Cheshire.

  • It's called pink.

  • It was a fast introduction, she grinned, and I said, Hello.

  • I asked if what she was drawing Waas, a pig, a flower, bubble gum, a butterfly, a flamingo, abo, a pen, a hat, a scarf, a jumper, teddy bear or a lollipop.

  • But she dissed, answered pink.

  • I learned very quickly that that was all that mattered.

  • Chester retold is, without doubt the most challenging on daring teaching I have ever undertaken, and I am not one stay in my comfort zone.

  • This is a cent exercise taking place in a corridor.

  • There is rosemary and orange blossom and lavender and lilac.

  • And some students were exploring thes smells and the memories that they triggered, while others were engaging with the memory line in a room nearby.

  • This is another example of how mindfulness was embedded on the module.

  • Partly as a result of the challenges encountered, Chester Retold is also the most valuable and important teaching I've ever delivered on the teaching of which I am most proud This is the undergraduates working together with participants from live on their own scent stories in the story house board room, Nevis here I'm her fellow students in pink, recognizing the extent of the barriers faced by the young people from live.

  • Cheshire in particular, was extremely challenging, both personally and professionally.

  • Working out how to include people with an extremely wide range of needs in a genuinely inclusive way has made me and my colleagues think much more broadly about people's bodies and minds.

  • It is only by doing this work that exclusions from higher education can really be challenged.

  • It is only by working at the very edge of what is possible in higher education that higher education can really grow.

  • This is another community student, might Noakes, who actually submitted written work while on the module and gained a high 21 mark.

  • It is entirely up to community students whether or not they complete an assignment, but the option is always there.

  • I feel much of Chester retold has not been delivered to my students, but co delivered by them.

  • For example, this is a storyboard Guidry together, a different person drawing each square.

  • This is the story we told a woman who wishes 18 72 would hurry along, discover she can time travel on ends up in 1972 where she meets the love of her life.

  • Appropriately, we concluded, love really is timeless.

  • As yes has pointed out, education is merely the lighting of a fire.

  • Once that first spark was ignited in a person, there's no knowing where the internal energy will and can take them on your work.

  • As a teacher, it's done here.

  • We all are in this story house, Green room, where the axis relax.

  • On that, on the screen of the back is the stage.

  • There is nothing more powerful that you can give people than prompting them to find inspiration.

  • Motivation on dr in themselves.

  • English can do that.

  • The biggest lesson I have learned through working with marginalized groups is that the stigma is often much greater than the perceived challenge, meaning that it is the stigma, the thought that it cannot work that actually prevents inclusion rather than the difficulties themselves.

  • We must stop falling student numbers.

  • This talk is a call to action to all those studying English, teaching English, thinking about teaching it or who know of anyone who might be interested in this most beautiful.

  • On important of subjects, we can stop falling student numbers.

  • One way is to reinvigorate English by involving local communities and shaping our teaching around reflection, understanding and compassion for others.

  • When these skills are needed more than ever, Benjamin Franklin famously remarked, Tell Mae I'll not forget.

  • Teach me and I may remember involved May I'm.

  • I learned as English teachers in terms of our curriculum, our local communities, on the very survival of our subject, we must now involve two evils.

no.

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B1 chester teaching module compassion cheshire student

Teaching English Using Compassion | Eileen Pollard | TEDxUoChester

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/04/04
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