Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • The college student created a Lego version of herself to send out as a resume. It`s not an April Fools` joke, it`s coming today on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • First up, though, we are taking you to the Korean Peninsula.

  • North and South Korea haven`t been involved in open conflict since 1953 when an armistice ended the fighting in the Korean War.

  • But yesterday, they were exchanging fire, not on the land, but at sea.

  • The North sent a fax yesterday warning its southern neighbor that it would be doing live fire exercises meaning military exercises with actual weapons.

  • This is the first time in recent years that North Korea has had these kinds of drills, and South Korea called it a hostile threat.

  • It said some North Korean shells landed in South Korean waters.

  • So, it responded by firing back again into the sea and sending fighter jets to patrol the area.

  • North Korea often provokes its neighbors by firing rockets and missiles into the ocean around the Korean Peninsula.

  • The United Nations is telling Japan to stop a yearly whale hunt.

  • Since 2005 there`s been a Japanese program that`s captured hundreds of whales off the coast of Antarctica.

  • Commercial whaling is illegal, but there`s a loophole in the law that allows whaling for scientific research.

  • And Japan says its Antarctic program is for science.

  • The International Court of Justice says that program is now banned.

  • That there`s been more killing than scientific discovery.

  • The ruling will not prevent Japan from hunting whales in other places, and smaller scale whaling by individuals is often allowed.

  • But some Japanese say they are being unfairly singled out.

  • ut some Japanese say they are being unfairly singled out. Their whaling in general is Japanese tradition and that it should be respected as long as the whales are in endangered.

  • Is this legit? An estimated 65 percent of the world`s population has access to the Internet.

  • Not legit.

  • The CIA estimates there are just over 2 billion Internet users worldwide, or about 30 percent of the global population.

  • And more than half of those with Internet access use Facebook.

  • More than a billion people. Last year, Facebook`s founder controversially called Internet access a human right.

  • And while that`s debatable, Facebook`s hoping to get people connected in places where they are not,

  • increasing both the number of people on line and potentially the number of people on Facebook.

  • Imagining for the first time in history humanity firing on whole cylinders.

  • Facebook`s taking to the skies, in an effort to bring the Internet to the world.

  • Turning its attention to unmanned aircraft or drones and satellites to reach the roughly 5 billion who can`t get the Internet.

  • CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained the vision to CNN`s Chris Cuomo last August.

  • Here, we use things like Facebook to share news and catch up with our friends, but there - they are going to use it to decide what kind of government they want,

  • get access to health care for the first time ever, connect with family hundreds of miles away that they haven`t seen in decades.

  • Getting access to the Internet is a really big deal.

  • Internet.org is Facebook`s effort to bring together the world`s biggest tech companies, to find a way to reach people with no access to the Internet.

  • But first, Facebook has to figure out how to use this technology to reach those people, many of whom live in underdeveloped places in Asia and Africa.

  • Zuckerberg says the company has hired experts from NASA and U.K. based a center, the developer of the longest lying Solar power drones to help.

  • Facebook`s Ciel Maquire (ph) says satellites are constantly on the move, so you have to figure out a way to capture the information,

  • from which one of them while they are passing over specific place.

  • Solo powered unmanned aircraft can offer solution in less populated areas.

  • So we are looking at a new type of plane architecture that flies at roughly 20,000 meters, 20 kilometers,

  • because that`s a point where the winds are the lowest, it`s above commercial airlines, it`s even above the weather.

  • And actually can stay in the air for a month at a time.

  • And these planes are solar powered and they sit there and they just circle around and they have the ability to just broadcast Internet down, but significantly closer than a satellite does.

  • Facebook says its motives are altruistic. Internet for all.

  • But others point out that universal online access also opens up a world of new potential Facebook customers.

  • Ralitza Vassileva, CNN.

  • Forget Internet. Today`s Roll Call mascots are going old school as in medieval legend old school.

  • We`ll start with some dragons.

  • Welcome to Gretna High School. Glad you`re watching in Gretna, Nebraska.

  • Next, we have the Lancers.

  • Next, we have the Lancers. Good to see you at Longfellow Middle School in Falls Church, Virginia.

  • And how about the black nights? They are up in Syracuse, New York, on the roll at Henninger High School.

  • Certain wind turbines are like giant three bladed fans.

  • When the winds spins their blades then can generate renewal clean energy.

  • They do make noise, which bothers some people and they are known to kill birds at wind farms.

  • The U.S. is building several wind farms off shore.

  • Scientists think they can survive weaker hurricanes.

  • A Stanford professor says they could actually weaken hurricanes, though the number of turbines that that would take may not be feasible.

  • Hurricane season won`t begin in the Atlantic basin until June 1st.

  • But the South Pacific storm season is in full swing.

  • At any point in time, in fact, it is the season for hurricanes, typhoons, or cyclones somewhere in the world.

  • With winds up to an astounding 190 miles per hour, fierce storms can dump more than 2.4 trillion gallons of rain in a day.

  • At this point the world really has nothing to defend against nature`s fury.

  • But a Stanford study says there may be something that could stand in a hurricane`s way.

  • Quite literally. It`s not some brand new technology or hypothetical machine I`m talking about.

  • It`s wind turbines.

  • According to the study, large numbers of wind turbines could slow down the outer winds of the hurricane, decrease wave heights, and cause it to dissipate faster.

  • The authors say 78,000 300-foot turbines off the coast of New Orleans could have reduced Hurricane Katrina`s wind speeds by as much as 98 miles per hour by the time they reached land and decreased storm surge by an incredible 79 percent.

  • Considering the billions of dollars of destruction a single storm can cause, a solution that provides renewable energy, pays for itself, and saves lives.

  • April is financial literacy month.

  • And if you are planning on pursuing higher education, we are planning a glossary of terms to help you understand what to expect,

  • especially as a lot of you are in the application process right now.

  • Today`s term cost of attendance or CoA.

  • It`s not just tuition, it`s the actual amount you`ll be paying each year at college once you add in living expenses, books, transportation and other stuff that comes up.

  • So while in-state tuition at a public school in Georgia, for example, is around $10,000 per year,

  • once you throw in your dorm room, a seven day meal plan, books and other expenses, your CoA jumps up to $22,000 a year.

  • So, it`s important to look and plan beyond tuition if you`re planning to go to college away from home.

  • It started as a science fair project, 14-year old Suvir Mirchandani found that printer ink costs more per ounce than Chanel number five perfume.

  • So, he focused on ways to use less of the ink.

  • My research led me to conclude that the government could save almost $234 million, simply by switching to that one font.

  • And that`s because the font is thinner, it`s lighter, it`s just simply uses less ink - just simply looking at it,

  • you won`t be able to tell that it actually saves 30 percent of ink cost, so those are my conclusions.

  • So, for state and federal governments using the times new Roman font on printouts,

  • Suvir says the switch to the lighter Garamond fund would use less ink, saving a total of $400 million a year.

  • But Garamond`s a smaller font.

  • But Garamond`s a smaller font.

  • So, some critics say it`d be less legible at the same size.

  • And they say the government pays for ink differently, so the switch might not save that much, though it could save us a few bucks at home.

  • It`s not a great job, market for recent college graduates.

  • How can they make themselves and their resumes really stand out?

  • Here`s one idea. Leah Bowman, a junior at Northwestern University built herself in Legos.

  • She used some computer programs, including Lego`s free digital designer software for the resume, and she raided her dad`s Lego collection to actually build herself brick by brick.

  • The resume alone may not land her a dream job just yet, but to get an employer`s attention this idea`s a blockbuster,

  • even if they see other colorful resumes, how are they going to Lego off this one?

  • It`s instructive and good self-marketing, it builds on her creativity and talent,

  • it leaves the competition at pieces.

  • This block party is over.

  • We`ll put another show together for you on Wednesday. I`m Carl Azuz.

The college student created a Lego version of herself to send out as a resume. It`s not an April Fools` joke, it`s coming today on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

April 1, 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles

  • 1936 65
    VoiceTube posted on 2014/04/01
Video vocabulary