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  • - Hey, Mike.

  • How you doing, buddy? - Hey.

  • What's up, Corey?

  • May I take a look at your sword?

  • There we go.

  • Thing of beauty.

  • Wow, it looks awesome, man.

  • CHUMLEE: Sweet.

  • Samurais are pretty bad ass.

  • COREY HARRISON: Thanks, Mike.

  • All right.

  • COREY HARRISON: I'm baffled, man.

  • I couldn't tell you what I bought.

  • CHUMLEE: It's a samurai sword.

  • COREY HARRISON: Shut up, Chum.

  • I am a Japanese sword appraiser and dealer.

  • The guys call me up whenever they get something

  • new or interesting, and I help them determine

  • what its current value is.

  • After World War II, it's estimated about 3 million

  • Japanese swords came out of Japan that were confiscated

  • by the occupation forces.

  • Most likely, this is something like that.

  • COREY HARRISON: OK.

  • Samurais are pretty bad ass.

  • Well, samurai were very honorable,

  • very determined warriors.

  • So even if you and I were fighting, and I admit defeat,

  • I would even ask you honorably to cut off my head

  • and assist me.

  • They wanted to basically show that, OK, I'm a man.

  • This is it.

  • It's my time, and can you help me?

  • Not the way I'd play it, but OK.

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: Rick, you don't look very happy.

  • RICK HARRISON: Yeah, apparently I don't need you anymore,

  • because Chum knows everything there

  • is to know about swords now.

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: Well, I told you to call me

  • if you ever needed some help.

  • RICK HARRISON: So can you tell me about these things?

  • Or should I ask you?

  • Yeah, check them out.

  • So generally, when you're looking at swords to buy,

  • you always want to check the tang to see if it's signed,

  • to see if anybody famous made the sword.

  • This sword is signed Soshu Ju Akihiro.

  • He's one of the most famous makers

  • of Japanese sword history.

  • You know, people spend years and years and years

  • looking for the holy grail of Japanese swords.

  • They're worth up to $3 or $4 million.

  • [music playing]

  • I like where this is going, Rick.

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: Unfortunately, the signature

  • appears to be a forgery.

  • [music playing]

  • Well let me take a look at the handle with your permission.

  • Absolutely.

  • That was slick.

  • So this blade is actually very interesting,

  • because during the 1800s, there was a great rebellion

  • and a civil war going on, and many factions

  • were trying to take over Japan.

  • This blade was made in 1863 by Nagahiro

  • and was given to the Lord of Choshu

  • to protect Japan against enemies of the emperor,

  • the imperial family, and especially

  • against the Tokugawa, or the military leader.

  • So this is quite an important sword historically.

  • May I take a look at your sword?

  • Oh absolutely.

  • Right ahead.

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: You know, swords like this, they're laminated,

  • and they're made with about 33,000 layers of steel.

  • Yes, sir.

  • So their cutting ability is unparalleled.

  • During World War II, there was footage of one that cut

  • through a machine gun barrel.

  • CUSTOMER: Wow.

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: This was very prominent around 1000

  • to around the late 1200s.

  • And swords in that time period are well worth anywhere

  • from $50,000 up to $4 million.

  • [music playing]

  • It is really rare to find a sword from the 1200s

  • in fully intact condition.

  • Getting a sword like that is kind of like winning the lotto.

  • [music playing]

  • COREY HARRISON: So tell me, is it real?

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: We have to remove the handle to take

  • a look at the signature.

  • [music playing]

  • So what this says is actually Shin Ro.

  • He's a very famous maker, Iwama Shin Ro.

  • But there is no such maker as Ishida Koeda unfortunately.

  • And swords from the Kamakura period were worn opposite,

  • so the signature would actually be on this side of the tang.

  • CUSTOMER: OK.

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: What we have here is actually a reproduction

  • of a Kamakura period sword.

  • Wow.

  • RICK HARRISON: Over two years ago,

  • I sent a samurai sword to Japan to get fully restored.

  • Finally, it's back in the states,

  • and Mike brought it to the shop today.

  • I can't wait to see this.

  • Here it is.

  • [music playing]

  • There we go.

  • Oowee, that thing looks sweet.

  • Oh, that's nice.

  • The blade itself was made right around 1500, right?

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: Yeah.

  • Before it was polished, it's a little hard to tell,

  • but after it's polished, we can see the detail more clearly.

  • OK.

  • Early 1600s is where we agreed after the polish.

  • COREY HARRISON: OK.

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: We changed the casing to a new one, here.

  • And we did a special handle wrap in the old traditional way.

  • And we did early 1600s fittings.

  • But now, since it's all polished and everything,

  • you're going to have to have somebody take care of it.

  • OK.

  • They used to do this in samurai movies after battle.

  • This is called uchiko.

  • This is the final powdered form of polishing stone.

  • CHUMLEE: Little dab, dab, dab.

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: Basically what it does

  • is it takes off fingerprints, old oil, dirt, and dust.

  • RICK HARRISON: So what's it worth?

  • MIKE YAMASAKI: I'd say you're looking

  • that the sword's value in around the $35,000 to $40,000

  • territory.

  • RICK HARRISON: I think I did all right.

- Hey, Mike.

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/31
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