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  • Time for ten minutes of commercial free current events. I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Our first today centers on the landslide in Washington State.

  • he governor has declared the state of emergency and hopes for finding survivors are fading.

  • This happened on Saturday night affecting two rural communities north of Seattle.

  • It covered a square mile and killed at least 14 people.

  • Officials say more than 170 others are still unaccounted for, though that doesn`t necessarily mean they are all victims.

  • At least 50 homes and buildings were damaged or destroyed.

  • How does this happen?

  • What happens when you get more rain than you should right around this mountain ranges.

  • It becomes very, very heavy and the soil begins to soak and gravity just pulls it down and when you get those very steep slopes, too steep to support it,

  • It becomes very, very heavy and the soil begins to soak and gravity just pulls it down and when you get those very steep slopes, too steep to support it,

  • the slope falls and that`s where you get your mudslide and that`s exactly what has happened.

  • U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama has gotten a lot of attention over the years for her efforts to fight childhood obesity in America.

  • She promotes another cause involving young people.

  • She wants them to study abroad.

  • Right now she`s in China where she discussed exchange programs yesterday with Chinese and international students.

  • But she recently sat down with CNN I-Report to answer some viewers` questions about studying abroad.

  • Hi. I`m First Lady Michelle Obama and I`m here to answer your I-Report questions.

  • Hi, Mrs. Obama. My name is Willie James.

  • I`m from Atlanta, Georgia.

  • And I studied abroad in Kyoto, Japan, for one year, back in 2008-2009.

  • My question to you is what advice would you give to young American students going abroad for the first time?

  • Number one, be open.

  • Try to enter the experience with no preconceived notions about the country you`re going to or the people in that country.

  • You`ve got to try to shake the fear.

  • You know, you can`t approach this opportunities thinking that everything is going to feel good and comfortable and you`ll get everything right.

  • You probably are going to make a lot of mistakes, but you know what, that`s life.

  • In other parts of the world that you go to, they will appreciate your effort,

  • your energy as long as you come into the experience respecting the people and the culture that you`re coming into.

  • Hi, Mrs. Obama. My name is April Thompson. And I`m currently in Accra, Ghana.

  • My question for you is where did you receive your first passport stamp and how that experience impact the person that you are today?

  • Our sophomore class had an opportunity to spend a week for break in France,

  • and initially, I was nervous about taking that week.

  • I didn`t want to ask my father to pay for that trip.

  • It felt like an extravagance.

  • It felt like an extravagance.

  • And I remember breaking down in tears feeling guilty about even asking him if I could go.

  • He wanted me to have all the experiences that he didn`t` have.

  • And he didn`t blink an eye in paying for that trip.

  • So, I got on a plane with some of my classmates and we stayed in a youth hostel and spoke a lot of bad French and learned a lot.

  • You heard the First Lady mention cost there, and while studying abroad can unlock a lot of cultural and educational doors for students,

  • it`s usually done at an additional fee, and not everyone can afford it.

  • Student loans might help, but as things stand now, the average debt for college graduates who got student loans is more than $27,000.

  • Undergraduates, you`ve got some company.

  • You`re not the only one leaving school with a mountain of debt.

  • And, in fact, graduate students are taking out even bigger loans.

  • More than $57,000, to be exact.

  • That`s the median debt load for a student with the graduate degree, anything from an NBA to a master`s and medical or a law degree.

  • nd that 57,000 is up from 40,000 in 2004.

  • A 43 percent increase according to the New America Foundation.

  • There are a few factors at play: schools have raised prices partly because they are getting less aid from state governments.

  • There are a few factors at play: schools have raised prices partly because they are getting less aid from state governments.

  • Some people lost their savings in the recession and have to borrow more these days.

  • Also, many undergraduates are having a hard time finding work, so they are going back to school for a higher degree.

  • That could add to an already existing debt load.

  • But some say, it`s worth it because in the long run, there`s a return on investment in the form of higher earnings, and many students believe grad school will give them a leg up when they start looking for a job.

  • I`m Alison Kosik in New York.

  • Time for the Shoutout. Which term best describes an organization that`s formed to ensure certain wages and benefits for its members?

  • If you think you know it, shout it out! Is it merger, union, allotment or junction? You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • A union, specifically a labor union focuses on working conditions and pay for its members.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • But that`s for paid employees in the workforce.

  • What would it look like on a college campus if football players try to unionize?

  • They are not paid in wages, though many of them get scholarships, they are not guaranteed medical benefits for injuries, though they have a choice about whether to play.

  • They are not paid in wages, though many of them get scholarships, they are not guaranteed medical benefits for injuries, though they have a choice about whether to play.

  • These are questions and arguments that could be settled in court.

  • It was Jafiar Bros (ph) childhood dream to play college football.

  • It was Jafiar Bros (ph) childhood dream to play college football.

  • And this is my best season.

  • But it could cost him a lifetime of pain.

  • You were (INAUDIBLE) fastest guys in the Stanton (ph) High School.

  • Yes. And now you can`t run. I can`t run.

  • He fractured his legs while playing, and now has metal rods in both.

  • He can`t afford the surgery to have them removed, because there is no financial help for former college athletes.

  • A big burden for someone with chromic injuries like his.

  • But this would cost a significant amount of money, if you were to take this out.

  • Yes. Over $20,000. Between $20,000 and $30,000 to take it out.

  • But then it would all be on you. All on me. No one else will pay for that? Yes. All on me.

  • Medical coverage is just the beginning of the criticisms against the NCAA and how they treat their college athletes.

  • But never before have current players been so vocal and standing up for themselves.

  • That is not until now. Last month the members of the current Northwestern Football Team got together and they decided they are going to try something.

  • Something that could revolutionize the way the NCAA works.

  • I would like to take the Northwestern .

  • They are trying to form a union, an incredibly bold move, given the tight control over athletes in a multibillion dollar industry of college sports.

  • Athletes don`t have a voice.

  • The idea came from former Northwestern quarterback Kain Colter.

  • Ironically, he got it during a college course. Almost all of his teammates back him.

  • The current model resembles a dictatorship.

  • Now, they are taking their fights before the National Labor Relations Board.

  • One, two, two, three!

  • But the team is up against their own university, which has applauded their leadership, but said, Student athletes are not employees, but students.

  • And the NCAA added that their participation in college sports in voluntarily.

  • While there is growing public support for NCAA reform, some question whether this is the right approach.

  • I think it`s just very risky .

  • Labor law professor Richard Epstein is no fan of the NCAA.

  • He`s called it a cartel. But he doesn`t think a union is the solution.

  • Generally speaking, putting a union opposite an industry cartel creates more instability than it eliminates.

  • But Yarboro (ph) says he`s never been more proud to be a wildcat than the date those players stepped up and essentially said enough.

  • So, this hearing boils down to this: whether or not the judge agrees that these athletes should be considered employees.

  • The university says no, they are students first.

  • But the athletes say football dominates everything they do.

  • There`s a lot of testimony about the rigorous of their schedule, the amount of hours they put in, the classes that they simply don`t have time to take.

  • And if the judge agrees with them that they are, in fact, employees of the university, then they can move forward and unionize.

  • Sara Ganim, CNN, Chicago.

  • Today`s Roll Call is going global. Why? Because it`s worldwide Wednesday and you`re going to love it.

  • We are starting with Grace Christian Academy.

  • We are starting with Grace Christian Academy.

  • Great to see you on the island of Saipan in the Northern Mariana Islands.

  • Then we are saying hello to the overseas family school.

  • They are online and watching CNN STUDENT NEWS from the island nation of Singapore.

  • And from there, we`ll travel to Bangladesh.

  • Where we`re glad to have viewers at the University of Dhaka, the Bangladeshi capital.

  • People can appreciate a good magic trick.

  • The coin is there, it`s gone. Whoopi! Not as fun for dogs.

  • A magician recently made a treat disappear right in front of dogs` noses.

  • He wanted to know if dogs like magic.

  • The answer - nope, not fun.

  • Some would call this a doggone shame (ph).

  • To be fair, the dogs were given treats right before and after the trick.

  • So, while they might have been confused by the empty hand, they weren`t confounded with an empty stomach.

  • So, they didn`t` have to hound in for a one more treat, though some thought (INAUDIBLE) tease.

  • Some might have wanted to pick and ease into his bag of tricks, and mastiff his intentions were good.

  • Or if he had plotted against them all along.

  • Hey, at least they got something to chow.

  • And while I love the terrier I know the puns pug some of you.

  • We`ve had a voilat (ph) of them. Just how many more canine think of? I wish someone could pointer me in the right direction.

  • They don`t appear by magic, then I wouldn`t have to caleave you just yet and say good bye for shnouzer.

  • We`ll retreat more news and pun for you tomorrow.

Time for ten minutes of commercial free current events. I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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