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  • Pie days are awesome. They only bake up once a year.

  • We`ll bring you a slice of info about that later today on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • First up, a vote: will Crimea, a region of Ukraine, become part of Russia?

  • 2 million people leave there, and their local government has scheduled a referendum for Sunday that could determine their political future.

  • Many Crimeans want closer ties to Russia.

  • There`s a good chance they`ll vote for it, but the new leaders of Ukraine as well as the U.S. and some other members of the international community say the vote goes against Ukraine`s constitution.

  • That this part of the country can`t just break off from it and join another country.

  • Russia would likely welcome that decision.

  • We`re bringing you two very different perspectives on this today.

  • First, from the capital of Ukraine, where many people want closer ties with Europe than with Russia.

  • This is Independence Square, the Maidan, they call it, where the protest movement began and so many people lost their lives.

  • But the story, of course, has now moved hundreds of miles away to Crimea.

  • So, we are going to ask young people here what they think about the possibility of losing part of their country.

  • I think that this would be the disaster.

  • This definitely would be the disaster because we consider Crimea as a part of Ukraine and those people who live there despite the fact that they speak Russian, they are Ukrainian.

  • This referendum is completely illegally.

  • And all this is inspired by Russian agents and foolish people who thinks that in another country they will have a better life than in their own country.

  • Already some in Crimea are leaving, many heading to Kiev to be with family and friends,

  • not wanting to wake up next week in another country.

  • not wanting to wake up next week in another country.

  • Michael Holmes, CNN, Kiev, Ukraine.

  • Very different take on this in the Russian capital of Moscow.

  • We`ve talked about how Crimea gives Russia access to its only warm water port in the Black Sea.

  • So, it`s important strategically to Russia, but as Phil Black found, it`s important in other senses as well.

  • At Moscow`s Danilovsky (ph) Market, you`ll find quality food, middle class shoppers and workers who aren`t quite so well off.

  • This microcosm of the Russian capital is a long way from the Crimean Peninsula, but almost everyone here says they feel a connection to it.

  • Crimea was always Russian, and it should stay Russian, and it`s all he says.

  • Not surprisingly, Vladimir Putin`s handling of the crisis is popular, which explains approval ratings up around, 68 percent.

  • Absolutely, I support it. That`s not even up for discussion, Irina says.

  • Well done, Putin, I`m extremely grateful we have such a leader.

  • Most of these people admit they are informed by Russian media, much of which is controlled by the state.

  • Inna knows Western reporting tells a different story.

  • She wants Crimea to stay with Ukraine. It`s a minority view.

  • Most believe Crimea is like the delicacies available here at the market, a vital part of Russia`s history and culture.

  • It`s been more than six days since Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 vanished over Southeast Asia.

  • And when we produced this show, there was no word on what happened to it or the 239 people aboard.

  • U.S. officials said on Thursday, they might expand their search area to look in parts of the Indian Ocean.

  • That`s far west of the last known location of the flight between Malaysia and Vietnam.

  • They said there`s new information that the plane could have flown for hours after its transponder stopped working,

  • and quit sending signals of the plane`s location and altitude.

  • Some experts are saying, it`s possible that the jet`s engines might have been sending info to satellites for four or five hours after the last transponder signal.

  • But even that`s not certain.

  • And Chinese satellites photos that appeared to show something floating off the Malaysian coast, turned out nothing.

  • Time for the Shoutout. A 22-year old is considered to be part of which generation?

  • If you think you know it, shout it out. Is it Millennials? Baby boomers, Silent Generation or Generation X? You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • People born in the 1980s or `90s are generally considered to be Millennials.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • When it comes to money, Millennials tend to have less of it than previous generations like Gen Xers or baby boomers.

  • Millennials student loan debt is higher.

  • Their unemployment is higher.

  • Despite that, they are optimistic about the future.

  • In a recent Pew survey, 85 percent of Millennials said they either had enough money to live the lives they want, or that they expect to one day.

  • It`s interesting how their generation is impacting housing in the U.S.

  • It`s the fastest growing part of the housing market you may not see in your neighborhood.

  • New apartment buildings popping up everywhere.

  • Now, at the largest share of total new home construction, since the 1970s.

  • New rental apartment projects surged 56 percent in 2011.

  • 36 percent in 2012, 25 percent last year.

  • And they are forecast to rise nine percent this year.

  • So, has this rental rise reached the top floor?

  • Experts say not yet. Why?

  • Call it housing`s millennial effect.

  • Unemployment still stubbornly high for younger Americans.

  • And many already owe tens of thousands in student loans.

  • When Millennials find a job, they just want a roof over their head, not a mortgage.

  • Plus, credit is tight.

  • So, buying is tough, a down payment even tougher.

  • Also, Millennialls value mobility. And urban areas offer convenience.

  • That demand pushing up rent prices across the U.S.

  • Rent is up three percent over the past year, and nearly twice that in renter-heavy cities like San Jose, San Francisco, Seattle and Boston.

  • But long term, the Millenniall effect could produce a familiar result.

  • As this generation grows up, as children finds more steady employment,

  • the need for more space and the financial prospects of owning a home could push Millennialls into single family homes.

  • And lift the housing market for everyone else.

  • Christine Romans, CNN, New York.

  • A royal welcome to all our kingly viewers in the Midwest today.

  • Starting with the River Kings and Queens of Clinton, Iowa, they are watching from Washington Middle School.

  • Next, long live the Kinsman (ph) of Penn High School.

  • They are online in Mishawaka, Indiana, and we`ll wrap our royal journey in Kingman, Kansas, home of the Eagles of Kingman High School.

  • Anyone can learn the solve for explit (ph), no one has solved Pi.

  • he Guinness world record for reciting numbers in Pi is held by a Chinese man who memorized just under 68,000 digits.

  • We usually just abbreviate it to 3.14. That makes today 3.14, March 14, Pi Day.

  • Who doesn`t like Pi? Whether it`s an old fashioned apple pie, the Oscar- winning Life of Pi, a pepperoni pizza pie.

  • Unless it`s a slice of humble pie, it brings us together.

  • Of course, if you dropped the E in it, you`ll drop some of the enthusiasm.

  • But the true mathletes out there can always bake up a little fun on Pi day.

  • It`s celebrated every year on March 14.

  • That`s 3/14 is in the first few digits of Pi, the ratio of a circle circumference to its diameter.

  • You could call our fascination with it irrational, and that`s just the kind of number it is.

  • An irrational one.

  • It just goes on and on without stopping or repeating.

  • At least as far we know.

  • Computers have calculated Pi to its 2 quadrillions digit.

  • Don`t ask me what that means, I majored in telecommunications.

  • What I can tell you is that when it comes to this ratio, the Pi is the limit.

  • I know a lot of you like it when we pike on puns. A lot of you count on it.

  • We could just say, good pie without any good pie puns, without waiving good pie, without adding a single word.

  • But given the chance to cook up a report like that, something that could apple to a lot of students, something that could really oven things out at the end of the week - well,

  • you can always crust us to try our berry best, make a bake and aim for a refreshing batch of Friday pie day puns.

  • All right, we are going to leave you with some images we`ve seen on CNN STUDENT NEWS throughout the week.

  • I`m Carl Azuz. See you Monday.

Pie days are awesome. They only bake up once a year.

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March 14, 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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