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  • (running)

  • Woo-hoo, that was a good run.

  • You'll notice that I started over there,

  • and I ended up over here.

  • Notice I'm using the words there and here,

  • and it is my understanding that

  • when you are learning the English language,

  • those two words,

  • and the phrases we use them in

  • can be a little bit confusing.

  • So, in this English lesson, I will help you

  • understand how to use the words here and there.

  • Sorry, I'm a little bit out of breath.

  • We will look at the words here and there,

  • and we will look at some phrases

  • that we use with those two words.

  • (upbeat music)

  • Well, hey, welcome to this English lesson

  • on the words here and there.

  • I'm so happy that I can be here to help you learn

  • a little bit more about the English language.

  • Before we get started though, don't forget to click

  • that red subscribe button below and give me a thumbs up

  • if this video is helping you learn

  • just a little bit more English.

  • So, before we talk about phrases

  • with the words here and there,

  • let's talk about the basic meanings of each of the words.

  • The word here refers to any area right around me.

  • So I am standing here in front of you.

  • When I talk about the word here,

  • just imagine that the speaker,

  • or the person using the word here,

  • is at the center of whatever they are talking about.

  • So I am standing here, I am in the center.

  • The word there is the opposite.

  • So anything far away from me.

  • I am standing here.

  • I am not standing there.

  • So the first phrases I want to talk about

  • are phrases that use up here and up there.

  • I am currently on the ground,

  • but I could climb up there.

  • Let me do that for a sec.

  • Now that I have finished climbing,

  • I would say that I am now up here.

  • So when I was on the ground, I described it as

  • that I wanted to climb up there.

  • But now that I have arrived, I would say

  • that I am now up here.

  • I should climb down again.

  • I don't climb up this high very often.

  • I'm a little scared of heights.

  • The next two phrases I wanted to look at

  • are the phrases down there and down here.

  • Currently, I am up on this wagon,

  • and I want to climb down there.

  • I'm gonna do that slowly.

  • I don't want to shake the camera too much,

  • and I don't want to fall.

  • But now that I am down here,

  • I feel a lot safer.

  • So I was definitely up there,

  • and now I am down here.

  • Hopefully you're not getting confused yet.

  • The next two phrases I wanted to look at

  • are the phrases over there and over here.

  • You'll notice maybe that it's raining a little bit,

  • but my umbrella is over there.

  • I should go get my umbrella

  • and bring it over here.

  • When your umbrella is over there,

  • and it's raining where you're standing,

  • you need to go get it.

  • So let me go get it,

  • and bring it over here.

  • See if, there we go.

  • That's a lot better.

  • So, you'll notice that my umbrella was over there.

  • But now my umbrella is over here.

  • This is much nicer.

  • I hope the rain doesn't last too long.

  • I have quite a ways to go making this video yet.

  • So let's talk about the two phrases, in here,

  • and in there.

  • I have this pylon, and I have this pail.

  • Because they are close to me, I can.

  • Ooh, that echoes a little bit.

  • I can put this pylon in here.

  • If this pail though was far away,

  • let me go put it far away,

  • I could say that I am going to go put this pylon in there.

  • In fact, I could use the phrase over there

  • to say this as well.

  • I'm going to go over there,

  • and I'm going to put this pylon in there.

  • You might be wondering why I'm putting pylons in the pail.

  • It was the first two things I found that I could use

  • to demonstrate these phrases.

  • Anyways, that pylon is now in there.

  • Let's talk about the phrase on here or on there.

  • If I wanna put this pylon on this wagon,

  • I could say, I'm going to put in on here.

  • Can't quite see that, can you?

  • Because the wagon is close enough that I can reach it,

  • I can say that I'm going to put the pylon on here.

  • But if I wanted to put the pylon on that trailer,

  • I would say that I'm going to go put it on there.

  • So I'm standing inside my barn right now,

  • and I wanna talk about the phrases out there and out here.

  • If I was inside a building looking out,

  • I could say,

  • oh, it looks like it's raining out there.

  • So I'm talking about the area outside of the house

  • using the phrase out there.

  • I think it is raining out there,

  • I think it might be cold out there,

  • I think that it might snow out there later today.

  • I hope it doesn't snow.

  • I know I like snow,

  • but I hope it doesn't.

  • If, however, I am actually outside,

  • I could say that it is raining out here,

  • I could say that it is cold out here,

  • I could say that it might snow out here later today.

  • Honestly, I don't think it's going to snow,

  • but it is kinda chilly.

  • I took my gloves off earlier

  • and I set them down somewhere

  • and I haven't found them back yet.

  • I should go look for them because

  • it certainly might get a little colder later today.

  • But right now, out here,

  • it is just raining,

  • and maybe later it will snow out here.

  • We'll see.

  • So over there,

  • you can see Jen.

  • She just came back from the grocery store.

  • We are staying self isolated,

  • but we did need to send Jen out to get some groceries.

  • So she went to the grocery store,

  • but you can see her over there driving in.

  • I'm just using the phrase over there if you didn't notice.

  • So I'm gonna use my fake phone for this one.

  • If I was to dial someone's number

  • and if the phone was to ring

  • and then the person who picked it up

  • wasn't the person I was calling,

  • I could say, is Dave there?

  • So basically, I am asking if you

  • could get Dave and put him on the phone.

  • So I would use the word there.

  • Is Dave there?

  • If I was the person answering the phone,

  • let me change my costume for a second,

  • I would be like, hello?

  • No, Dave's not here.

  • So notice,

  • oops,

  • notice when I am making the phone call,

  • I am saying, is Dave there?

  • And when I am answering the phone call,

  • I am saying, no, Dave's not here.

  • Did you know that we also use the word there

  • in one of our greetings in English?

  • Sometimes we will say to people,

  • hi there, how are you doing today?

  • So I can't go to a restaurant today,

  • that would be irresponsible,

  • but there are two phrases you might hear

  • in a restaurant using the words here and there.

  • The waiter or waitress,

  • when they bring your food,

  • might say,

  • here you are

  • or here you go,

  • or they might say,

  • there you go.

  • It's just a simple English phrase

  • that means here is your food.

  • I don't know why we say it,

  • but it's just a nice thing that you

  • will hear when a waiter or waitress brings your food.

  • Here you are

  • or here you go

  • or there you go.

  • So there are two phrases that I use

  • with the word here in it that I use when I'm driving.

  • A lot of times, before we leave,

  • I will actually say,

  • okay, here we go.

  • Does everyone have their seatbelts on?

  • I say, here we go to my kids

  • and to Jen to let them know

  • that I am putting the car into drive or reverse

  • and that we are about to start our journey.

  • And there's another phrase

  • that I say when we get to our destination.

  • A lot of times,

  • when we get to our destination,

  • I will say, here we are.

  • Basically letting the kids know

  • and Jen know that we have arrived.

  • So when we leave,

  • I say here we go,

  • and when we arrive, I say here we are.

  • So when we did have school,

  • my kids would wait way out there for the bus.

  • And when they would see the bus coming from far away,

  • they would say, here comes the bus.

  • This is a phrase we use in English

  • with the word here

  • to indicate when something is coming.

  • So here comes the bus.

  • After they get on the bus

  • and the bus leaves,

  • we would use a different phrase.

  • We would say, there goes the bus.

  • So when you say here comes the bus,

  • or anything else that is coming,

  • it means that you see it

  • and it is coming towards you.

  • When you say, there goes the bus,

  • or are talking about anything else that is leaving,

  • you are basically saying that it is going away from you

  • and it is leaving.

  • So here comes the bus,

  • there goes the bus.

  • So we have another phrase

  • in English that uses the word there,

  • and it's the phrase, to be there for someone.

  • This is really hard to do right now

  • in the world because we are all supposed to stay home.

  • You are staying home, right?

  • Stay home, stay safe.

  • But we have this phrase,

  • to be there for someone.

  • When you say that you are there for someone,

  • it means that they can share any bad things

  • that are happening to them in their life

  • and that you will be very compassionate

  • and you will be very kind

  • and very supportive of them.

  • So when you are there for someone,

  • it means that you are a shoulder

  • that they can lean on in a time of trouble,

  • and that you are someone

  • that they can talk to if they need to talk to someone.

  • So hopefully, right now we can all be there

  • for each other around the world

  • as we go through this crazy, crazy time.

  • Well, h