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  • Good morning!

  • As we get started today I'd like to introduce you to 17 people

  • each depicted here by a circle on the screen.

  • I don't actually know their names,

  • but I know two essential facts:

  • one is that each has mental disorder,

  • and two is that they will all commit suicide

  • during the time of my talk.

  • Let me give you a little context.

  • How common is mental illness?

  • How often is suicide associated with mental illness?

  • Let's imagine that our TEDxTokyo community here

  • of four hundred people represented the world population.

  • We know that at any point in time 20% of the population has mental disorder.

  • That would be 80 people here in our TEDxTokyo community.

  • Now, a significant number of those cases will be mild.

  • But, if we take the most severe, the most enduring,

  • the most debilitating mental disorders, like schizophrenia,

  • major depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders,

  • we are still taking about 6% of the population,

  • 24 people right here in the auditorium.

  • Mental disorder -- it's common, it's serious, it's global.

  • Some current examples.

  • In the US, we have soldiers returning from the Afghanistan and Iraqi wars.

  • Returning alive and well.

  • Last year 6,500 of these veterans returned home safely

  • only to commit suicide when they were back.

  • 6,500 suicides is more lives lost

  • than the total number of deaths in combat for the US military since the two wars began.

  • In Nepal, different culture,

  • different segment of the population, similar story.

  • Suicide has emerged as the single leading cause of death

  • for women in child bearing years.

  • At a time when their world should be expanding,

  • these women have opted to take their own lives.

  • And here in Japan, in the wake of the disaster of 2011,

  • the devastation continues to climb in terms of psychological distress,

  • disorder and suicide.

  • The truth is no country has a monopoly

  • on mental illness and no country is spared.

  • This year we conservatively estimate,

  • that 900,000 people with mental disorder,

  • almost a million people with mental disorder, will commit suicide.

  • That means that today, June 30 2012,

  • 2,400 people with mental disorder will commit suicide,

  • including the 17 whom I introduced you to at the beginning of my talk.

  • In fact, seven of our 17 have already died.

  • So, I can imagine you saying, "OK, I get it, it's common,

  • it's serious, it's global. But it's not my problem."

  • But I want to challenge you on that. It is your problem, it is our problem.

  • Consider for a moment, the father who drinks too much,

  • loses his job and can't care for his family.

  • Consider the mother who develops postpartum depression,

  • can't raise her baby.

  • Consider the son with anxiety disorder,

  • so difficult that he can't leave his room.

  • Or the uncle, who on a manic episode winds up in the police station instead of at his desk at work.

  • Or the daughter, the friend, whose eating disorder is so severe

  • she lands in the a hospital instead of on the soccer field.

  • But I've got good news.

  • And the good news is that we have treatments that work.

  • We have treatments that have been developed, tested and demonstrated

  • to help the majority of people across the spectrum of disorders.

  • That should be great news, right?

  • But it's not great news because we've got one major obstacle.

  • One major problem.

  • Remember I said that if our TEDxTokyo community

  • represented the world population,

  • 24 of us would have serious mental illness?

  • Well, let's imagine that you have schizophrenia

  • and let's imagine that you have major depression,

  • let's imagine you have bipolar disorder

  • anxiety disorder, eating disorder.

  • And now imagine that I ask you to stand and be recognized.

  • If you were a cancer survivor,

  • you might expect a round of applause,

  • but that's not the case for mental illness.

  • People with mental illness

  • live with shame, with anxiety,

  • with the fear that they'll be discovered.

  • And those feelings are a product of the stigma of mental illness

  • and it is this stigma that is the single greatest obstacle

  • to improving the lives of millions of people with mental disorder around the globe.

  • Some people don't agree with me. They say it's funding.

  • But that is a smoke screen for the stigma of mental illness,

  • because if mental illness were a priority,

  • the funding would follow.

  • And as long as mental illness is optional,

  • something that we can take care of

  • after we take care of the real problems,

  • there'll never be enough funding.

  • And the irony is that we are spending billions and billions of dollars

  • every year around the globe ignoring mental illness.

  • in lives lost, in disability, in lost work productivity.

  • It's not about the funding.

  • Some people say, it's just too complicated.

  • The treatments are too sophisticated, too labour intensive.

  • That again, it's stigma in disguise.

  • Let's go back to cancer for a moment.

  • Think about the research, the technology, the sophisticated protocols,

  • the care that goes into every single case for someone who has cancer.

  • Nobody says it's too complicated,

  • it's too sophisticated, it's too labour intensive

  • and so it should be for mental illness.

  • And some people simply despair.

  • Why bother? People don't get better anyway.

  • But it's not true. Again, it's stigma in disguise.

  • We have demonstrated that we have treatments that work.

  • We can even show

  • that these evidence-based treatments are effective in communities that,

  • historically, have not had access to mental health care.

  • In rural, remote communities in sub-Saharan Africa

  • and Pakistan, women have received these psychotherapies,

  • women with depression, not only recovered from their depression

  • but their children have better health

  • and education outcomes a year later.

  • That's a investment worth making!

  • The stigma of mental illness in all of its various forms

  • has its roots dating way back --

  • it's really a very primitive emotional experience

  • that dates way back to our way evolutionary history.

  • To a time when we didn't understand anything about mental illness,

  • we didn't understand how or why people develop mental illness,

  • we certainly didn't have any treatments.

  • But we know better now

  • and given what we know about the ideology of mental illness,

  • and given what we know about the treatments that are available,

  • there's no excuse to continue acting

  • as if these myths and misperceptions were true.

  • We have the potential to dramatically improve the lives

  • of millions of people around the globe, suffering from mental illness.

  • By putting an end to this stigma,

  • we can get people to the treatments

  • and treatments to the people who need them.

  • But we need your help.

  • We need your help, acknowledging that,

  • by acknowledging that mental illness is common, serious and global.

  • By advocating for the rights and for treatment

  • for someone suffering from metal disorder.

  • And by acting now to debunk the myths, to correct the misperceptions,

  • you can help put an end to the stigma of mental illness.

  • 17 suicides, every ten minutes, is 17 too many.

  • Millions of people suffering from mental illness around the world

  • is millions too many.

  • Some think it's crazy to make mental illness a priority.

  • It's crazy not to. Thank you.

  • (Applause)

Good morning!

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【TEDx】TEDxTokyo - Kathy Pike - Don't Call Me Crazy [English]

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    阿多賓 posted on 2014/02/28
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