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  • This is the CNN STUDENT NEWS. Welcome to Wednesday show. I`m Carl Azuz, reporting from Atlanta.

  • Venezuela is one of three divided countries we`ve told you about recently.

  • It`s seeing protests against its president, rallies in support of him and violence in the upheaval.

  • Its current leader like its previous one has been controversial.

  • He`s moved the country further towards socialism, expending the government`s control over things like businesses, the economy, the media.

  • In fact, the government`s been pressuring Venezuelan media to downplay the violence in the country.

  • But word of instability is getting out.

  • More wreckage to fortify opposition lines.

  • Caracas`s wealthier east side was blockaded Monday.

  • Antigovernment activists responding to the twitter #day of the barricades.

  • I don`t want to wait in food lines. I don`t want to be kidnapped. I`m a hostage in my own home, she says.

  • Scores of picket lines sprang up. The opposition seems to be beefing up its bid to topple Venezuela`s socialist government.

  • Outrage at soaring crime and a tanking economy triggered the protests.

  • But across on the city`s poor west side, there are few signs government loyalists are deserting on mass.

  • Pro-regime motorcycle clubs, just the latest call group to show public support for President Nicolas Maduro.

  • The president insists the opposition is trying to stage a U.S. -funded coup attempt.

  • The right wing extremists are being marginalized in Venezuela, and it`s us, the revolutionaries who were getting support from other countries, the president said.

  • No rule opposition protesters agree on the changing tactics, especially since the barricades are in the opposition`s own neighborhoods.

  • The pro-government loyalists are armed, and we aren`t, so we are shielding behind barricades and wait for them to arrive, he says.

  • As the day wore on, there was no word of serious clashes, but the battle lines have been drawn.

  • It`s Worldwide Wednesday on CNN STUDENT NEWS, and we`re going to stay in South America for the first part of today`s roll call.

  • In the nation of Ecuador, we are glad to be part of your day at Academia Cotopaxi.

  • This school is in Ecuadorian capital of Quito.

  • Moving north now to Canada, thank you for watching at Philemon Wright High School. It`s located in Gatineau, Quebec.

  • And across the Atlantic Ocean, the Italy - hello to the students and teachers of ITCS Leon Battista Alberti.

  • Glad to see you in Veneto.

  • For the first time, the U.S. government is getting involved in how food is marketed in public schools.

  • The Obama administration wants schools to eliminate ads for foods that are high in sugar, fat and salt.

  • Critics say it shouldn`t be up to the government to decide what kids eat, and some school districts think the latest rules might mean lost revenue from ads.

  • Our classrooms should be healthy places where kids are not bombarded with ads for junk food.

  • New rules proposed by First Lady Michelle Obama and the U.S. Department of Agriculture would eliminate advertisements for unhealthy food and drinks in schools.

  • Parents should be in control of their kids` health.

  • And their good efforts at home shouldn`t be undermined when they send their kids off to school.

  • It would mean hallways and score boards with coke or Pepsi advertisements would have to be changed.

  • The new push comes on the fourth anniversary of the first lady`s let`s move initiative.

  • It`s fighting childhood obesity by promoting healthy eating and exercise while encouraging healthy choices.

  • And water just surpassed soda as the most commonly consumed beverage in America.

  • Yeah! Go on! Drink up! She says the program is showing results.

  • Children born today will be accustomed to eating healthy food during the school day.

  • So for them the norm will be fruits and vegetables and not chips and candy.

  • She says, for schools healthy students are not the only benefit.

  • Although they are not changing - charging any more for their lunches,

  • they are actually making more money because more kids are participating in the school lunch programs.

  • The American Beverage Association, which represents brands like Coke, Pepsi and Dr. Pepper,

  • came out in favor of the new proposed measures. I`m Alisa Reiny (ph) reporting.

  • Time for The Shoutout. Which of these adjectives relates to the sense of sight?

  • If you think you know it, shout it out. Is it: ocular, obstruent, gustatory or haptic?

  • You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • The adjective ocular has to do with eyes or eyesight, so that`s your answer and that`s your Shoutout.

  • A piece of ocular technology has Internet giant Google getting more involved in politics.

  • We`ve talked about Google glass before. It`s eyewear with the small camera and TV screen.

  • The camera lets you take pictures of whatever you see.

  • The screen lets you read email, see texts and get directions and other info.

  • Lawmakers in several states are considering banning Google Glass for drivers.

  • They are concerned the eyewear will create another distraction, and that people will pay more attention to what`s on Google Glass than what`s on the road.

  • Google says laws against its product aren`t necessary. It`s lobbying politicians in several states to keep Google Glass legal.

  • The company argues that Glass isn`t widely available enough to justify a ban.

  • But an Illinois state senator who wants a ban says the wearable technology will be widely available in the future.

  • Another lawmaker in Maryland says if someone`s pulled over with Google Glass, it will be difficult for police to prove whether the device was operating.

  • The solution, he said, ban it altogether.

  • Our next story today is about Braille. It`s a universal system of writing for and by blind people.

  • And users raised dots that are read when fingers are passed over them.

  • Braille printers can run thousands of dollars, but not this one - it cost a seventh grader in California 350 bucks for the Lego Minestorms kit.

  • Plus, the few extra dollars for some materials from the Home Depot.

  • Shubham Banerjee hopes his invention will help people in poor countries who may not be able to afford a commercial Braille printer.

  • His invention isn`t perfect. It`s slow and it needs improvements to print out full pages of text. Banerjee is working on those.

  • And he`s putting a complete how to on the Internet. So anyone could build one of their one at a relatively low cost.

  • Yesterday we told you about incredibly high pollution in the Chinese capital and showed you some seriously foggy pictures.

  • That show is available on our archive section at cnnstudentnews.com.

  • Until the cold front comes this week, the air is unsafe for anyone to spend time outside, even for recess.

  • So, what`s a school to do?

  • Recess at the International School of Beijing. So where are all the students?

  • All 1900 of them banned from going outside, because the air is so bad.

  • So bad so often, the school built an enormous dome to scrub out the pollution.

  • The dome cost $5 million to build and took nine months.

  • It has a soft Teflon coated roof and the entire thing is pressurized.

  • Also, that these children can play in Beijing.

  • Housing a soccer field and basketball courts, it`s their strange reality of growing up in China.

  • Tiny pollution particles threaten health the most.

  • So they seal the air inside and clean it with three giant filters.

  • Monitoring air quality levels twice a day at 25 spots around the school.

  • In the past ten days alone, the pollution levels outside have been up to 12 times the World Health Organization acceptable rates.

  • On Lake Superior South Shore there are sea caves that people can typically explore by kayak or canoe.

  • Or you can just stroll right in.

  • One upside to a brutally cold winter, the ice on the lake is thick enough to walk to, then walk inside the caves.

  • Water sipping through the ground was crystallized by the cold. The movie Frozen comes to life.

  • More than 75,000 people have gotten these views on foot over the past month.

  • We are guessing those who hesitated finally caved.

  • After subfreezing temperatures, they needed to see what was a foot, what iceactly what this was all about (ph).

  • They certainly got a superior view after all.

  • What`s not to lake about it? Sad, isn`t it?

  • We`ll see you tomorrow when CNN STUDENT NEWS returns.

This is the CNN STUDENT NEWS. Welcome to Wednesday show. I`m Carl Azuz, reporting from Atlanta.

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February 26, 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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