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  • ...six months ago, and I emailed asking if I can please come.

  • I just wanted to sit in the audience

  • and watch to learn more about Cambodia.

  • And they said, "Sure, you can come.

  • You will be doing your talk on the first morning."

  • And I said, "Oh, talk. Okay."

  • So, I'm going to talk to you for just three minutes

  • about the importance of why you need to try

  • to make more mistakes.

  • Because everybody here,

  • no matter what, everybody has something

  • that you would like to do,

  • but that you're scared to do.

  • And the reason you're scared to do it is

  • because you think you will fail horribly

  • and everything will go wrong.

  • So, I'm going to tell you that it is important

  • to make those mistakes, and you have to try to

  • for very scientific reasons, like this:

  • Number one, learning.

  • The way that you learn is by making mistakes,

  • in the same way that muscles are built.

  • What this means is that

  • when you are in a gym, for example,

  • and you are lifting some kind of weight

  • that is too strong for you to lift

  • and you get that kind of quivering,

  • and you can't lift it,

  • what is actually happening is little muscle fibers inside,

  • some of them are tearing, literally tearing.

  • And over the next two days,

  • the muscle fibers repair themselves.

  • Every time they repair,

  • they repair themselves a little stronger,

  • and a little big bigger to adapt for future use.

  • So, like there is a saying,

  • "No pain, no gain."

  • And it's the same with the brain.

  • So, please take a second, and... take ten seconds,

  • and look at these two sets of words.

  • Okay.

  • In multiple tests,

  • they found that people remember this second set of words

  • three times as much as they remember the first set of words.

  • And neuroscientists have studied why,

  • it's when you are looking at

  • these words and you find a little gap,

  • your brain has to struggle for a second.

  • It actually is kind of failing.

  • It doesn't know what it is at first

  • and it takes a second to fill in the gap,

  • and then it figures it out.

  • And that one second of struggle

  • makes all the difference in the world.

  • That's why you retain the knowledge

  • on the right hand side more than the left.

  • You remember things you learned with some failures

  • and with some mistakes,

  • more than the things were easy.

  • So, to learn more effectively,

  • you need make more mistakes.

  • Doing what you know is fun,

  • but doesn't improve you.

  • So reason number one why you need to make more mistakes

  • is learning.

  • Number two is that quantity leads to quality.

  • And this comes from a story about a pottery class.

  • There was a university class

  • where they teach pottery making, I guess.

  • And the teacher tried an experiment one day,

  • or one semester I should say.

  • At the beginning of class for the whole semester,

  • he said, "Ok, class, I'm going to do an experiment."

  • I'll stand in the middle to do it right here.

  • He said, "Everybody on the left-hand side of the class,

  • for the entire semester, you are going to work

  • on just one pot, all semester.

  • And at the end of semester,

  • you will be graded on the perfection of that one pot.

  • He said, "Everybody on the right-hand side of the class,

  • you are going to be graded sheerly on quantity.

  • I don't care what you make,

  • I don't care what it looks like, I won't even look at it.

  • But in the last day of class,

  • I'm going to bring in my bathroom scale,

  • and we're going to weight it.

  • Anybody who has made over 15 pounds of pots, gets an A.

  • Anybody who made over 14 pounds of pots,

  • gets a B. C, etc.

  • So that's it. So the whole semester,

  • this half of room was working

  • just on one pot all semester.

  • This half of room will just throw in

  • pieces of clay on anything and it didn't matter,

  • they were just messing around.

  • On the final day of class,

  • the teacher brought in a few outside observers,

  • I guess they were pottery aficionados,

  • that came to look at these pots.

  • And he didn't tell the judges

  • which half of room the pots came from.

  • And maybe you are not surprised,

  • but all of the best pots in the final day

  • came from this half of class.

  • Because what they found is that all semester,

  • this half of class just kept trying stuff,

  • doing things, and making mistakes,

  • and doing experiments,

  • and getting so much experience making pots

  • that they got so much better.

  • Whereas this half had spent the whole semester

  • coming up with grandiose theories,

  • and at the end of semester

  • had nothing more to show for it

  • than some fancy theories and a mediocre pot.

  • So, anyway. Why you need to make more mistakes?

  • Number one, it enhances your learning.

  • Number two, it's that quantity, just doing things,

  • and making mistakes, and messing up,

  • in the end leads to better quality anyway.

  • And lastly, I went to a music school,

  • I went to a jazz school in Boston,

  • called Brooklyn School of Music.

  • And there is a common saying in jazz that

  • if you're not making mistakes,

  • you're not trying hard enough.

  • In classical music, everybody aims for perfection.

  • But in jazz, it's like if somebody gets up there and plays a perfect solo,

  • you kinda go "um!".

  • But if somebody gets up there and they're reaching for new notes,

  • they are hitting some occasional squeakers,

  • you go, "yeah, right on!"

  • So, and lastly it's a lot of more fun.

  • Thanks!

  • (Applause)

...six months ago, and I emailed asking if I can please come.

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A2 semester class pottery pot hand side jazz

【TEDx】TEDxPhnomPenh - Derek Sivers- Why You Need to Fail

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    阿多賓 posted on 2014/03/16
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